Oat milk shortage prompts sellers to charge over $200 on Amazon

This is oat-rageous. The great oat milk shortage of 2018 is leading some sellers on Amazon to take advantage by increasing the prices on the beloved vegan beverage to well over $200 for a case of 12 — nearly five times the typical retail price. The alternative milk, specifically Swedish brand Oatly, which invented the beverage, … Continue reading “Oat milk shortage prompts sellers to charge over $200 on Amazon”

This is oat-rageous.

The great oat milk shortage of 2018 is leading some sellers on Amazon to take advantage by increasing the prices on the beloved vegan beverage to well over $200 for a case of 12 — nearly five times the typical retail price.

The alternative milk, specifically Swedish brand Oatly, which invented the beverage, began experiencing a wave of popularity in the United States around 2016 and has cultivated a cult following among hipsters, vegans and lactose-intolerants alike, winning praise for its creamy texture and neutral taste. Oat milk was also lauded as being better for the environment than other nondairy milks.

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The vegan go-to later suffered from a shortage due to high demand and Oatly’s inability to keep up with it — the company notes the multi-stepped process, which involves soaking and using enzymes to break down the oats before milling and heating to produce a smooth milk-like liquid.

Those online have since shared their distress over the lack of oat milk.

Though many oat milk converts are lamenting the loss of Oatly, it seems that the $20 per 32 oz. case price tag isn't luring many buyers.

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“I know there’s a lot of stupid s— happening all the time, but it’s insane to me that there’s an actual oat milk shortage causing prices like this,” Matthew D’Ambrosio tweeted out.

Unfortunately, the “survivors” of the 2018 oat milk shortage shouldn't get their hopes up, as periodic shortages will likely continue to happen.

Mike Messersmith, the general manager of Oatly, acknowledged to the New Yorker that with this product, there are bound to be shortages.

“There’s a tension between speed and quality here,” he said in August. “We can’t just go to a manufacturer and say, ‘Here’s a bucket of oats, go and make oat milk!’ This was all too much and too soon.”

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Guess it’s back to almonds for now.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

Tom Shillue: Latest coffee study is nonsense – leave my morning ritual alone!

Once again science is promising to improve our lives.

After an exhaustive study, scientists tell us that the best time to drink coffee might NOT actually be first thing in the morning but actually an hour after you wake up. This is because in the hour after you wake up, your body’s production of cortisol is at one of its three daily peaks. This mysterious cortisol is known as the “alertness hormone,” so in order to achieve maximum alertness, we should delay the intake of caffeine, according to researchers. Which researchers? The kind who like to tell us what to do.

So I’m to understand that having a cup of coffee an hour after I want it is going to give me more "bang-for-the-buck" in terms of "get-up-and-go?” To that I have to ask, so what? What am I, a machine? I’m not a productivity exercise, I’m a man. I like to wake, then make, then drink a cup of coffee. I do it before I shower, before I brush, before I look in the mirror and say “Good morning, Tom! It’s going to be a great day!”

My daily coffee ritual is just that – a ritual. I grind the beans, boil the water, carefully pour the water over the grounds, smell the aroma, pour the beautiful dark liquid into my glass cup, and then I behold may work, before moving in for the sip. It's a won­derful part of my day.

So, now I’m told – “you're doing it wrong, Tom.” That I should change my behavior to get more “benefit.” But the assumption is that the main benefit from a morning coffee is medicinal, that coffee is a delivery system for alertness and productivity. Is that really what it is for most people?

Maybe for these wizards in the lab for whom everything can be reduced to data, but not for most of us. If that were the case, why wouldn’t we all just take a pill in the morning and be done with it?

This is coming from someone who is an admittedly a productivity freak. I love having a system, and plotting the different ways to make my workday more efficient. But it’s important for me to separate mere “tasks” from “joys.”

Coffee is a joyous part of my day. I wouldn't give it up for a more efficient "kick'. That’s why I like to make it myself and drink it from a real cup (ceramic is fine, but glass is my preferred vessel) and not a paper one.

In today’s world our goal should not be to find more ways to be productive, but more moments in which we can be deliberate and mindful.

In my experience, there is not an issue I’ve ever dealt with that hasn’t been tackled by the musical theater composers of the Great American Songbook, so let’s turn to the lyrics of an old song by Kander and Ebb called “Coffee in a Cardboard Cup,” which expresses my sentiments perfectly:

THE TROUBLE WITH THE WORLD TODAY

IT SEEMS TO ME

IS COFFEE IN A CARDBOARD CUP…

…THE TROUBLE WITH THE WORLD TODAY

IT`S PLAIN TO SEE

IS EV`RYTHING IS HURRY UP:

IT`S ALL BECOME LOONEY TUNES

WITH SUGAR PACKS AND PLASTIC SPOONS

AND `COFFEE IN A CARDBOARD CUP!

Well said, gentlemen! Now, I’ll ask the scientists to leave my morning coffee ritual alone.

Tom Shillue is host of The Tom Shillue Show, live Monday-Friday 3 to 6 PM ET, featuring comedic insight and analysis on the days trending topics as well as interviews with special guests. Shillue is a stand-up comedian and former host of FNC’s Red Eye, he joined FOX News Channel in 2015 and remains a contributor to the network.

5 coffee facts caffeine lovers should know about their cups of joe

There are many reasons to pick up a steamy cup of joe in the morning — and the delicious taste is just one of them.

The number of Americans drinking at least one cup of coffee every day is at its highest level in six years, according to Reuters, citing a study released by the National Coffee Association (NCA) in March 2018.

“We see the cola industry is declining, (but) coffee is in the front row,” Roberto Vélez, head of the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation, reportedly commented during NCA's annual meeting in the spring.

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Consumers are constantly getting updated about potential positive and negative effects of coffee. Here are five surprising things you may not know about coffee.

There may be a right time to drink your first cup

You may want to delay your first taste of coffee in the morning at least an hour after you wake up, a new study suggests.

In the first hour after you wake up, your body is reaching one of its three daily peaks of cortisol (a steroid hormone) production. Thus, you want to avoid drinking caffeine during this critical time, as cortisol can cancel caffeine's alertness effects and could possibly even help you build a tolerance for coffee.

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Neuroscientist Steven L. Miller agrees people should avoid drinking coffee during these high cortisol production periods to get the full benefits of caffeine.

Drinking coffee when your cortisol levels are low helps "smooth out your mood and energy level" so you can accomplish even more, Miller previously told Inc Magazine, noting someone who wakes up around 6:30 a.m. should wait to drink their first cup of joe until around 8 or 9 a.m.

There is such a thing as “too much”

You should limit yourself to four cups of coffee per day, the Mayo Clinic recommends. (iStock)

Sorry, coffee fans. There is such a thing as drinking "too much" coffee — at least, according to the Mayo Clinic.

The Minnesota-based medical center recommends limiting yourself to four cups of per day, or about 400 milligrams of caffeine, to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Those who drink more than four cups a day may start to notice side effects such as insomnia, restlessness and fast heartbeat, among other symptoms.

"If you're like most adults, caffeine is a part of your daily routine. And most often it doesn't pose a health problem," the Mayo Clinic states online. "But be mindful of those situations in which you need to curtail your caffeine habit."

It’s not as dehydrating as you may think

If you want to stay hydrated, many people may suggest steering clear of coffee. That's because for years, coffee has been rumored to actually cause dehydration — but that actually may not be the case.

While consuming coffee may increase urination, that doesn't necessarily mean you'll end up dehydrated.

"[T]he truth of the matter is, a small increase in urine output has little to do with dehydrating the body," Lawrence Armstrong, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Connecticut, told LiveScience in 2016. "If you drink a liter of water, [urination] will increase … Doesn't mean you shouldn't drink water."

A 2014 study also found "no evidence of dehydration with moderate daily coffee intake."

Millennials spend more on coffee than retirement plans

It's true. It appears millennials — born in the early 1980s through the early 2000s — are sometimes more keen to spend money on their daily coffee habits than invest in their future.

At the start of 2018, more than 40 percent of nearly 2,000 millennials surveyed admitted to spending more on their cups of coffee in the morning than their retirement plan, according to Acorns Money Matters. The average American reportedly spends around $1,100 a year on coffee.

It’s a good source of antioxidants

Coffee is a good source of antioxidants, but it shouldn’t totally replace your consumption of fruits and veggies. (iStock)

Researchers at the University of Scranton revealed in a 2005 study that coffee is the number one source of antioxidants in the U.S.

"Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than any other dietary source. Nothing else comes close," Joe Vinson, Ph.D., a chemistry professor at the University of Scranton and lead author of the study, said in an online statement at the time.

Vinson said it "easily outranked" other go-to sources for antioxidants such as tea, milk, chocolate and other items. However, Vinson did encourage drinking coffee in moderation.

"One to two cups a day appear to be beneficial," Vinson said, adding that it shouldn't replace other healthy items such as fruit and vegetables, "which are better for you from an overall nutritional point of view due to their higher content of vitamins, minerals and fiber."

Jennifer Earl is an SEO editor for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter @jenearlyspeakin.

Starbucks apologizes after barista accused of using racist name for Asian American veteran

A customer is trying to resolve an issue with a California Starbucks after a barista allegedly changed the name on his order to one mocking Asian people.

Johncarl Festejo, a recently retired Filipino-American Air Force veteran, was visiting the coffee chain in Vacaville with his 12-year-old daughter, Milan, before he took her to school Monday, KCRA3 reported.

Festejo said he ordered a hot chocolate, chocolate Frappuccino and banana nut bread.

When the barista asked for his name, he said “John.”

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However, when his order was called out, John said it was something much different.

"A few minutes later, I was just waiting in that area, and next thing I know, I hear, 'Is there a Chang here? Is there a Chang? We got a hot cocoa,'" he recalled to KCRA3. "I figured, no big deal. It was probably someone else."

"Then, I hear again, 'Banana nut bread for Chang.' I'm like, OK, probably the same order. Then, followed by that was the chocolate frap," Festejo continued.

Festejo said in addition to him telling the barista his name was John, he also paid for his order with an app on his phone, which has his name “Johncarl” displayed. Festejo went up to the counter and confronted the employee.

"I said, 'Ma’am, is this my order? Because my name is not Chang.' She responded that could it have been my name on the app," he said. "So, I double checked my Starbucks app. It says my name. I just asked, 'Is this some kind of joke? For real? Like, come on now.'"

Festejo said he saw the employee snicker when questioned, but did not push the matter right then because he had to get his daughter to school.

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After he dropped off Milan, he said he called the Starbucks corporate office to report the incident.

Festejo received an apology from corporate, as well as an apology from the district manager, KCRA3 reported, but the veteran was still bothered by the encounter.

"We didn't expect this, especially this day in age. Especially what just occurred recently in Starbucks, I didn't expect this would happen,” Festejo said, referring to the recent racial bias training Starbucks employees were forced to undergo after a viral incident happened with two black men in Philadelphia.

Starbucks said in a statement to Fox News that they have launched an investigation.

"At Starbucks, we take great pride in providing a warm and welcoming environment for everyone who enters our stores and expect our partners to uphold our values and follow through on our commitment. We have a zero-tolerance stance on discrimination of any kind, and the experience in question was not reflective of our mission and values. We have reached out to the customer and shared our deep regret for their experience, are conducting an investigation into the matter and will take the appropriate actions."

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The employee has been removed from the schedule while the investigation is being conducted.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

Dunkin’ says customers’ DD Perks accounts may have been compromised in security breach

Dunkin’ customers now have something slightly more pressing to worry about than getting the wrong football-themed cups.

In a statement posted to its website, Dunkin’ Brands has confirmed that its security vendors informed the company of a data breach on Oct. 31 that may have allowed a third party to obtain “usernames and passwords” for Dunkin’s DD Perks members.

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Dunkin’ also clarified that its own security was not breached, but rather that the usernames and passwords were obtained via “security breaches of other companies.”

The company said its own security blocked most unauthorized attempts to access the DD Perks member accounts, but admitted it was “possible” that some were not. Depending on what information each specific user had in their profile, third parties may have been able to access customers’ email addresses, account IDs, and first and last names, the chain said.

Dunkin’ “immediately” took action to prevent similar breaches in the future, the statement said, but advised DD Perks members to create “unique passwords” if they had not already done so during a forced password reset Dunkin’ required following the incident.

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“We also reported the incident to law enforcement and are cooperating with law enforcement to help identify and apprehend those third-parties responsible for this incident,” the chain wrote.

Starbucks will block porn on free Wi-Fi starting next year

Starbucks is not here for your creepy Internet searches — and YouPorn is not happy about it.

The coffee chain is now adding content filters to its free Wi-Fi that will block patrons from watching explicit content in stores, almost three years after it said it would.

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Starbucks first announced the inclusion of a tool that would prevent customers from watching pornography inside the store in 2016, after McDonald’s made the decision to block inappropriate content on its in-store Wi-Fi.

Though watching porn has also been prohibited at the store, Starbucks has said it will finally introduce the content blockers in 2019 to make the content inaccessible.

The move comes after years of pressure from non-profit Internet safety organization Enough is Enough, which called on the corporate coffee chain to censor the content, claiming its open Internet access allows sex offenders to break the law with impunity.

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"By breaking its commitment, Starbucks is keeping the doors wide open for convicted sex offenders and others to fly under the radar from law enforcement and use free, public Wi-Fi services to access illegal child porn and hard-core pornography," Hughes said in a statement.

Hughes went on to allege that "having unfiltered hotspots also allows children and teens to easily bypass filters and other parental control tools set up by their parents on their smart phones, tablets, and laptops,” Business Insider reported.

Enough is Enough launched a petition calling on Starbucks to honor its previous statement about adding content blockers. As of Thursday, it had nearly 27,000 digital signatures.

In a statement to Fox News, Starbucks said the decision was made to ensure the coffee shop remains a safe place for all and that people rarely use the public Wi-Fi to view explicit content.

“While it rarely occurs, the use of Starbucks public Wi-Fi to view illegal or egregious content is not, nor has it ever been permitted. To ensure the Third Place remains safe and welcoming to all, we have identified a solution to prevent this content from being viewed within our stores and we will begin introducing it to our U.S. locations in 2019,” the statement read.

McDonald’s, Chick-fil-A and Subway all introduced filters for pornography and other inappropriate material in 2016.

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Though Enough is Enough is relieved by the decision, one organization does not seem to be as pleased.

Pornography website, YouPorn, said in an internal memo they will be updating their company policy to ban all Starbucks products from its offices beginning January 1, 2019.

“YouPorn now runs on Dunkin’,” a company statement read.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

Starbucks’ new juniper latte drawing mixed reviews, strange comparisons: ‘It tastes like grass and dirt’

When it comes to capturing the spirit of the season, no one does a better job than Starbucks. With their array of syrupy-sweet holiday beverages like the peppermint mocha and gingerbread latte, the coffee chain knows how to serve up festivity in a cup. But their latest concoction is drawing some strange comparisons that aren’t so cheerful.

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The juniper latte, which the chain debuted Tuesday, is the latest wintery beverage to land on the menu. It features a “hint of juniper and sage, an evergreen aroma and citrus notes” and is made with espresso and steamed milk infused with juniper syrup and topped with foam and pine-citrus sugar, according to the press release.

Reactions to the beverage have been mixed. Many people didn’t know what juniper is. For those wondering, it’s an evergreen tree or shrub that grows small purple berries, most commonly used to make gin.

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Some people fully jumped on board the bandwagon, claiming the new drink is perfect for the season. Others, however likened it to some inedible items, including Pine Sol and trees.

Michelle Gant is a writer and editor for Fox News Lifestyle.