Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year. “He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone … Continue reading “Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn”

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year.

“He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone that would,” Chisolm, the founder of “50 Shades of Silence,” told Fox News.

His threats didn’t end there, she said. Chisolm, a former news anchor, became the latest victim of revenge porn. Within weeks, he began texting her lewd photos and videos he had taken of her while she was asleep. He threatened to make them public – and then followed through on his threats, creating a website full of naked images of her.

She grew frustrated because, for months, there was nothing she could do about it. A new app and search engine aims to help women like Chisolm by helping them find all their images on the web – and, in some instances, helping them pull them from the Internet.

“The quicker you can get the photos, the content, the harassing memes, whatever it is removed,” Chisolm said, “obviously, it can spread quickly so you want to move.”

“They (victims) need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.” (Fox News)

The app, FacePinPoint, launched three months ago and claims to be the first of its kind. It uses facial recognition technology to track down a victim’s intimate photos and videos online.

Chisolm said the site, which she did not use but endorses, is designed to give a voice to victims of cyber harassment and other online crimes. And, she added, it helps victims trace content they may not know existed.

“With his app, at least with this facial recognition for some people, particularly those whose content has been imported on to a porn website, you’re able to use his app and hone in and hopefully track it down and possibly get it removed,” Chisolm said.

In Chisolm’s case, she said she reached out to GoDaddy.com, the webhosting company where the images were displayed, but the company said she had to get a court order to have them removed. Months later, she is still in court.

"If we can independently confirm a violation of our terms of service we will take action," Godaddy.com representative Nick Fully told Fox News. "However, this is not often the case, such that we rely on due process afforded by the courts to dictate the appropriate course of action."

She now travels the world giving speeches and helping other victims of revenge porn through her site, 50ShadesofSilence.com.

Many sites require the original photo in order to have it removed, making it difficult for victims to have them removed if they did not take or have access to the photo. FacePinPoint uses a profile picture that clearly shows the victims face to find the explicit content.

“FacePinPoint is the best insurance to make sure your content is not online and if it is online, then you’re going to find it before someone that you know is going to use that to jeopardize your reputation,” FacePinPoint Founder Lionel Hagege told Fox News.

Once the user's identity has been confirmed – using photos and metrics – the website uses facial recognition to search for inappropriate images.

‘When we find those naked pictures, we store the face,” Hagege said. “We store them in our database and after, as a user, you just have to visit FacePinPoint.com.”

Hagege says facial recognition is very accurate unless there is excessive weight gain or loss.

“We measure the distance between your eyes, your nose, your forehead, everything. So, basically we not looking for your face, we are looking for the measures of your face,” Hagege said. “…if it’s like a couple pounds it will work fine.”

Hagege says if there is a match, the customer will get results in their user interface and a link where they can locate the photos online.

But experts question how effective these types of technology will be given that many of these revenge porn photos are posted in subscription sites – which are difficult to track down.

Facebook is developing its own revenge porn service, which is now being tested in Australia. Google Image Search could also be used.

Archie Agarwal, CEO of ThreatModeler, a cybersecurity firm, said regardless, finding the images is easy – it's taking them down from the web that is difficult.

“In my opinion, this type of service may not be worth using because it is unclear how accurate it will be and in the end, it’s not finding the images that is the problem, it’s getting the sites to take them down,” Agarwal said.

FacePinPoint does provide a network of pro-bono lawyers and psychologists, but only in five states. They are hoping to extend this service to the one in 25 Americans who are victims of revenge porn across the US by the end of 2018.

“They need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.”

Terace Garnier is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Columbia, South Carolina. Follow her on twitter: @TeraceGarnier

Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year.

“He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone that would,” Chisolm, the founder of “50 Shades of Silence,” told Fox News.

His threats didn’t end there, she said. Chisolm, a former news anchor, became the latest victim of revenge porn. Within weeks, he began texting her lewd photos and videos he had taken of her while she was asleep. He threatened to make them public – and then followed through on his threats, creating a website full of naked images of her.

She grew frustrated because, for months, there was nothing she could do about it. A new app and search engine aims to help women like Chisolm by helping them find all their images on the web – and, in some instances, helping them pull them from the Internet.

“The quicker you can get the photos, the content, the harassing memes, whatever it is removed,” Chisolm said, “obviously, it can spread quickly so you want to move.”

“They (victims) need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.” (Fox News)

The app, FacePinPoint, launched three months ago and claims to be the first of its kind. It uses facial recognition technology to track down a victim’s intimate photos and videos online.

Chisolm said the site, which she did not use but endorses, is designed to give a voice to victims of cyber harassment and other online crimes. And, she added, it helps victims trace content they may not know existed.

“With his app, at least with this facial recognition for some people, particularly those whose content has been imported on to a porn website, you’re able to use his app and hone in and hopefully track it down and possibly get it removed,” Chisolm said.

In Chisolm’s case, she said she reached out to GoDaddy.com, the webhosting company where the images were displayed, but the company said she had to get a court order to have them removed. Months later, she is still in court.

"If we can independently confirm a violation of our terms of service we will take action," Godaddy.com representative Nick Fully told Fox News. "However, this is not often the case, such that we rely on due process afforded by the courts to dictate the appropriate course of action."

She now travels the world giving speeches and helping other victims of revenge porn through her site, 50ShadesofSilence.com.

Many sites require the original photo in order to have it removed, making it difficult for victims to have them removed if they did not take or have access to the photo. FacePinPoint uses a profile picture that clearly shows the victims face to find the explicit content.

“FacePinPoint is the best insurance to make sure your content is not online and if it is online, then you’re going to find it before someone that you know is going to use that to jeopardize your reputation,” FacePinPoint Founder Lionel Hagege told Fox News.

Once the user's identity has been confirmed – using photos and metrics – the website uses facial recognition to search for inappropriate images.

‘When we find those naked pictures, we store the face,” Hagege said. “We store them in our database and after, as a user, you just have to visit FacePinPoint.com.”

Hagege says facial recognition is very accurate unless there is excessive weight gain or loss.

“We measure the distance between your eyes, your nose, your forehead, everything. So, basically we not looking for your face, we are looking for the measures of your face,” Hagege said. “…if it’s like a couple pounds it will work fine.”

Hagege says if there is a match, the customer will get results in their user interface and a link where they can locate the photos online.

But experts question how effective these types of technology will be given that many of these revenge porn photos are posted in subscription sites – which are difficult to track down.

Facebook is developing its own revenge porn service, which is now being tested in Australia. Google Image Search could also be used.

Archie Agarwal, CEO of ThreatModeler, a cybersecurity firm, said regardless, finding the images is easy – it's taking them down from the web that is difficult.

“In my opinion, this type of service may not be worth using because it is unclear how accurate it will be and in the end, it’s not finding the images that is the problem, it’s getting the sites to take them down,” Agarwal said.

FacePinPoint does provide a network of pro-bono lawyers and psychologists, but only in five states. They are hoping to extend this service to the one in 25 Americans who are victims of revenge porn across the US by the end of 2018.

“They need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.”

Terace Garnier is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Columbia, South Carolina. Follow her on twitter: @TeraceGarnier

Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year.

“He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone that would,” Chisolm, the founder of “50 Shades of Silence,” told Fox News.

His threats didn’t end there, she said. Chisolm, a former news anchor, became the latest victim of revenge porn. Within weeks, he began texting her lewd photos and videos he had taken of her while she was asleep. He threatened to make them public – and then followed through on his threats, creating a website full of naked images of her.

She grew frustrated because, for months, there was nothing she could do about it. A new app and search engine aims to help women like Chisolm by helping them find all their images on the web – and, in some instances, helping them pull them from the Internet.

“The quicker you can get the photos, the content, the harassing memes, whatever it is removed,” Chisolm said, “obviously, it can spread quickly so you want to move.”

“They (victims) need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.” (Fox News)

The app, FacePinPoint, launched three months ago and claims to be the first of its kind. It uses facial recognition technology to track down a victim’s intimate photos and videos online.

Chisolm said the site, which she did not use but endorses, is designed to give a voice to victims of cyber harassment and other online crimes. And, she added, it helps victims trace content they may not know existed.

“With his app, at least with this facial recognition for some people, particularly those whose content has been imported on to a porn website, you’re able to use his app and hone in and hopefully track it down and possibly get it removed,” Chisolm said.

In Chisolm’s case, she said she reached out to GoDaddy.com, the webhosting company where the images were displayed, but the company said she had to get a court order to have them removed. Months later, she is still in court.

"If we can independently confirm a violation of our terms of service we will take action," Godaddy.com representative Nick Fully told Fox News. "However, this is not often the case, such that we rely on due process afforded by the courts to dictate the appropriate course of action."

She now travels the world giving speeches and helping other victims of revenge porn through her site, 50ShadesofSilence.com.

Many sites require the original photo in order to have it removed, making it difficult for victims to have them removed if they did not take or have access to the photo. FacePinPoint uses a profile picture that clearly shows the victims face to find the explicit content.

“FacePinPoint is the best insurance to make sure your content is not online and if it is online, then you’re going to find it before someone that you know is going to use that to jeopardize your reputation,” FacePinPoint Founder Lionel Hagege told Fox News.

Once the user's identity has been confirmed – using photos and metrics – the website uses facial recognition to search for inappropriate images.

‘When we find those naked pictures, we store the face,” Hagege said. “We store them in our database and after, as a user, you just have to visit FacePinPoint.com.”

Hagege says facial recognition is very accurate unless there is excessive weight gain or loss.

“We measure the distance between your eyes, your nose, your forehead, everything. So, basically we not looking for your face, we are looking for the measures of your face,” Hagege said. “…if it’s like a couple pounds it will work fine.”

Hagege says if there is a match, the customer will get results in their user interface and a link where they can locate the photos online.

But experts question how effective these types of technology will be given that many of these revenge porn photos are posted in subscription sites – which are difficult to track down.

Facebook is developing its own revenge porn service, which is now being tested in Australia. Google Image Search could also be used.

Archie Agarwal, CEO of ThreatModeler, a cybersecurity firm, said regardless, finding the images is easy – it's taking them down from the web that is difficult.

“In my opinion, this type of service may not be worth using because it is unclear how accurate it will be and in the end, it’s not finding the images that is the problem, it’s getting the sites to take them down,” Agarwal said.

FacePinPoint does provide a network of pro-bono lawyers and psychologists, but only in five states. They are hoping to extend this service to the one in 25 Americans who are victims of revenge porn across the US by the end of 2018.

“They need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.”

Terace Garnier is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Columbia, South Carolina. Follow her on twitter: @TeraceGarnier

Soros dumps Facebook, Netflix stocks just before they dipped: report

Billionaire George Soros’ investment management firm has saved millions after completely selling off its shares of Facebook and slashing its stakes in Netflix and Goldman Sachs just before the stocks nosedived, a report said Wednesday.

Soros Management Fund saved $17.7 million in the fourth quarter by dumping the three stocks, Barron’s reported.

Goldman tumbled 15 percent in the fourth-quarter, while streaming-content giant Netflix plunged 29 percent since the end of September, according to Barron’s. Facebook has fallen 20 percent in the fourth quarter, hitting an intraday low of $126.85 on Tuesday.

DEPARTING FACEBOOK EXEC CLAIMS RESPONSIBILITY FOR TIES TO FIRM THAT INVESTIGATED GEORGE SOROS

The firm’s stake in Goldman shrunk from 64,814 shares at the end of June, to 28,206 at the end of September, according to Barron’s. Goldman Sachs' stock began its tumble earlier this month when the Justice Department revealed charges against two former employees for issuing bonds from 1Malaysia Development Bhd.

Cutting 89 percent—or 106,400 shares—of its Netflix position in the third quarter, the firm held only 13,800 shares at the end of the September, according to the outlet. Its stock began its slide in October when investors expressed skepticism over its future profitability.

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Soros Fund Management dumped all of its Facebook stock before the end of the third quarter and prior to the publication of a New York Time’s report that the tech company hired a GOP-opposition research firm to investigate links between Facebook critics and Soros, an outspoken opponent of the social media giant, according to Barron’s.

Meanwhile, the investment firm bought 91,200 shares of Chinese web giant Alibaba and 490,100 shares of chip maker Micron in the third quarter, Barron’s reported.

Both stocks have slid so far in the fourth quarter and could amount to a combined loss of $6.2 million for the firm, according to Barron’s.