Victoria’s Secret model trolls In-N-Out Burger with workout videos, gets accused of ‘fat shaming’

Victoria's Secret model Kelly Gale is catching heat and being accused of “fat shaming” for posting videos of herself working out in front of an In-N-Out Burger restaurant in California. The 23-year-old model posted a since-deleted Instagram story on Wednesday showing herself in a fitness routine outside the burger chain's Monterey location. The first clip shows … Continue reading “Victoria’s Secret model trolls In-N-Out Burger with workout videos, gets accused of ‘fat shaming’”

Victoria's Secret model Kelly Gale is catching heat and being accused of “fat shaming” for posting videos of herself working out in front of an In-N-Out Burger restaurant in California.

The 23-year-old model posted a since-deleted Instagram story on Wednesday showing herself in a fitness routine outside the burger chain's Monterey location.

The first clip shows Gale inside the restaurant asking “We’re at… In-N-Out? …so I guess I’m having my pear” before taking a bite out of the fruit she brought with her.

Other clips show her outside the restaurant's front door wearing workout gear.

“Who else works out at in n out?” a caption read.

Her workout consisted of jumping rope, deadlifts and leg exercises.

“Not gonna pretend that I eat here guys cause I don’t,” she captioned, in addition to "Hustle for the muscle right?" The video finishes with a friend bringing over a bagful of carrots, celery, baby tomatoes and bell peppers.

The video didn't go over well with some, who accused Gale of fat-shaming customers and her followers.

"Who the hell does @KellyGale_ think she is? How dare you #fatshame others? #kellygale @innoutburger is the best and you can eat whatever you want Ms. Gale but please don’t be so pathetic and unkind to others. #Entitlement is not cute #InNOut," user Khandra Moha tweeted.

"I think it’s pretty obvious @KellyGale_ is having some kind of mental issue and needs some help. Let’s not shame her like she choose to shame others," sissy2014fo tweeted.

"So model #KellyGale stood outside an #InOutBurger place and started shaming people for going to the fast food restaurant. I wish I’d be one of the customers because I would’ve been like: “Work harder! Is that all you got?!” while eating my French fries. Girl, please…," another said.

Gale did have some defenders.

"People getting salty at Kelly Gale for working out outside of an In-N-Out is comical. She’s drawing attention to healthy living, sorry that you’re realizing that stuffing your face with fast (fake) food doesn’t align with that," one user tweeted.

Gale's effort wasn't the first against In-N-Out to face a backlash.

In August, an IN-N-Out burger boycott proposed by then-state Democratic Party chairman Eric Bauman of California failed miserably when many of the restaurant's loyal customers objected to the plan and other states tried to lure the company to move its headquarters out of California.

Bauman resigned the party leadership in November amid allegations of sexual misconduct.

Jenna Jameson shares keto diet tips after 80-pound weight loss

Jenna Jameson keeps shedding the pounds post-baby thanks to her keto diet.

The former adult film star posted details of her meal plan on Instagram Monday along with a side-by-side before and after showing her progress.

"Here is an example of what I eat in the day on #keto," she wrote.

"I wake at 8 am and have a cup of regular coffee with stevia and sugarfree Italian sweet cream creamer," she began. "I then wait until 11 am to eat breakfast. I have hard boiled eggs prepared already in my fridge so I peel three, cut a full avocado add it together and sprinkle with 'everything but the bagel' seasoning," she continued. "At around 2 pm I start to feel hungry again so I cook a steak in a pan with avocado oil, serve it over arugula."

For dinner, Jameson, 44, says she prepares salmon in the oven with lemon, butter and dill around 5 p.m. and serves it with broccoli or asparagus.

Jameson also noted that she doesn't mix meat and dairy because she eats Kosher, but says her followers should feel welcome to do so.

The blonde bombshell, who welcomed daughter Batel Lu in April 2017, says that when she's hungry, she eats, particularly because she's breastfeeding — but that she makes it a point to avoid keto breads and snacks and focus solely on whole, organic foods.

The "How to Make Love Like a Porn Star" author has shared her weight loss progress for months.

In July, she showed off her then-57-pound weight loss.

In September, Jameson revealed it took 17 months to get to her goal weight of 123 pounds post-baby, then admitted she was dealing with loose skin as a result of shedding so many pounds.

She lost about 80 pounds since her weight loss journey began and works out at home rather than at a gym, but doesn't want her size to define her.

"You are enough. No matter your size," Jameson wrote on Instagram in October. "Weight does not define your beauty … I felt beautiful at my bigger size. I also felt disappointed and unhealthy. Taking control of your weight helps your confidence and health but it doesn’t make you beautiful … your inner light does that."

How long should it REALLY take to lose weight?

We’re constantly confronted by before and after shots. People who’ve “changed their bodies in six weeks” or “got their pre-baby body back.”

But how long does it really take to lose weight? Here’s the science behind weight loss.

What to expect

If you’ve asked your doctor or trainer “how long does it take to lose weight?” you may as well have asked how long is a piece of string. There are numerous factors that affect people’s weight loss — from age, fitness and health status to lifestyle.

That said, a realistic rate of weight loss for most people is around one to two pounds a week. Weight loss can plateau and yo-yo, so there is no designated time period to ditch that extra layer of fat — despite the common 12-week challenges.

You need to continually mix it up, keep focused and set achievable short and long-term goals.

Weight loss vs. fat loss

Seeing the scales flash four pounds in a week doesn’t necessarily mean all your hard work is paying off. There are three explanations for weight loss: losing body fat, losing water and losing muscle.

With a balanced diet and regular physical activity, you’ll most likely shed fat and preserve lean muscle tissue (ideal world). However, if you’re more focused on your calorie restriction or following the latest fad diet at the expense of exercise, then you’ll lose all three components, but most likely more muscle and water.

This may appear great on the scales, but the results are never long-lived. Why? If you regain the weight, more fat and less muscle is replaced. Then once you come off the diet your body thinks another famine is coming and works hard to store away whatever energy it can — most likely as fat. You are left with a body that jiggles instead of one that is toned.

Age vs. fitness age

If you’ve noticed losing weight gets tougher with age, you’re not wrong. As you get older your body loses muscle mass, which slows your base metabolic rate (the rate at which it burns calories).

But that’s not the only age that affects weight loss. Your fitness age — the number of years you’ve been physically active for — determines your base level physique and the speed at which you shed pounds.

If you’re new to training (or overweight) and start exercising three to four times a week and eating healthily, then you could lose up to four pounds a week. Alternatively, if you’ve been training three to four times a week and eating correctly for a while, you’ll probably lose weight at s steadier pace.

Get a grip of your lifestyle

Losing weight can be more complex than just eating healthily and exercising. If you’re struggling to shift the scales, consider the role your lifestyle plays. Are you stressed? Not getting enough sleep? Are your friends and family helping you stay on track? Or perhaps you have underlying health issues?

The conclusion

Every body is individual. Not one size fits all. You can train and eat exactly like someone else and have entirely different results.

While most experts would agree that one to two pounds a week is realistic, the truth of the matter is that slow and steady wins the race.

Not the message you really want to hear, I know.

Kathleen Alleaume is a nutritionist, exercise physiologist and author of “What’s Eating You?“

This article originally appeared on News.com.au