Casey Anthony’s former roommate speaks out in doc: ‘She’s lying about everything’

Clint House said he’s still stunned that his former friend, Casey Anthony, was reportedly in good spirits while her daughter was missing. House has come forward in a new Reelz documentary titled “Casey Anthony: Her Friends Speak,” which features interviews with those who knew “America’s most hated mom," as Nancy Grace once described her. Anthony’s … Continue reading “Casey Anthony’s former roommate speaks out in doc: ‘She’s lying about everything’”

Clint House said he’s still stunned that his former friend, Casey Anthony, was reportedly in good spirits while her daughter was missing.

House has come forward in a new Reelz documentary titled “Casey Anthony: Her Friends Speak,” which features interviews with those who knew “America’s most hated mom," as Nancy Grace once described her.

Anthony’s attorney did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment concerning the airing of Reelz’s show.

Caylee Anthony, 2, was last seen on June 16, 2008, but was first reported missing by her grandmother on July 15. When Anthony was arrested on charges of child neglect, she told police at that time Caylee had disappeared with a babysitter.

A utility worker working in a wooded area near the Anthony home in Orlando, Fla., found skeletal remains on Dec. 11 that were later determined to be Caylee’s. Experts would testify that air samples indicated that decaying human remains had been present in Anthony’s trunk.

The government, however, failed to establish how Caylee died, and they couldn’t find her mother’s DNA on the duct tape they said was used to suffocate her. After a trial of a month and a half, the jury took less than 11 hours to find Anthony not guilty of first-degree murder, aggravated manslaughter and aggravated child abuse.

Still, Anthony was convicted of four counts of lying to police (though two counts were later dropped) and served about three years in prison while awaiting trial. Today, she lives in the South Florida home of Patrick McKenna, a private detective who was the lead investigator on her defense team. She also works for him, doing online social media searches and other investigative work.

Just four days after Caylee was last seen, Anthony was captured in various photos celebrating at Fusion nightclub and participating in a “hot body contest” at a party hosted by House. However, House insisted that no one in Anthony’s circle knew the toddler had vanished.

Caylee Anthony (AP)

“At that time, none of us knew that Caylee was missing,” he explained. “We couldn’t be surprised. We weren’t surprised until after the fact, until police were talking about it, asking questions. Until the media got ahold of it and things exploded. We were shocked and surprised that she could be out here doing what she had been doing that night, and meanwhile, her child is missing. It came as a big shock once we found out about it. But we just didn’t know.”

House claimed the last time he saw Anthony before the trial was in downtown Orlando on July 3.

“She just didn’t seem like there was anything wrong,” said House. “She was like, ‘Hey, how’s it going? Good to see you.’ Then we went our separate ways. That’s the hardest part about this whole story, is that she was just completely so normal during the time Caylee was supposedly missing.”

House first met Anthony, whom he described at the time as “a fun, bubbly person who liked to have a good time,” in April 2008. She started dating then-boyfriend Anthony Lazzaro, who was living with roommates Cameron Campana, Nathan Lesniewicz and House.

Caylee Anthony with her mother Casey. (Reuters)

“She just pretty much started staying over on a regular basis,” he said. “She never technically moved in… but pretty much she slowly started… staying a little more often.”

House said he met Caylee a few times before she vanished.

“She was a very intelligent 2-year-old,” House recalled. “She was going on 3 [years old] before she went missing, but she was probably one of the sweetest little girls. Very articulate for her age. You could understand 90 percent of the words that were coming out of her mouth when she was talking to you. She seemed just so full of life, and she was just a great little girl. She was very well-behaved.”

In the documentary, House vividly described that Anthony appeared to be a dedicated parent and took her role seriously.

Clint House — Reelz

“What we saw in front of us was a very loving, attentive mother,” said House. “I even testified to that in the trial. That is what I saw with my own two eyes. I never saw her get angry at Caylee. I never saw her grab Caylee in any kind of abusive manner. I never saw her have to discipline Caylee because Caylee was such a well-behaved child… She just seemed like a good mom.”

House first learned Caylee was missing after an ex-girlfriend called and told him to turn on the news. He was stunned to learn that Caylee had disappeared.

“I don’t think you can ever quite prepare yourself for hearing that a little girl you’ve been in contact with within the last couple of months is all of a sudden missing, and she’s been missing for a month,” said House. “There’s nothing you can do to prepare yourself or to hear something like that. It was like a punch in the gut.”

House said he was in disbelief by the reports until he had to sit down and speak with investigators. In the documentary, House visited the spot where Caylee’s remains were found and became emotional by what he witnessed.

Casey Anthony listens to testimony during her murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse on June 30, 2011 in Orlando, Florida. Anthony’s defense attorneys argued that she didn’t kill her two-year-old daughter Caylee, but that she accidentally drowned. (Getty)

“How was it that all the searchers miss this?” he said. “… It was harrowing to be there and see the leftover remains of all the people that had come and put stuffed animals that had started to decompose into the dirt. That was just really hard, knowing that’s where she ended up. She didn’t deserve that at all. She really didn’t.”

The Florida Department of Children and Families concluded that Anthony was responsible for her daughter’s death because her “actions or the lack of actions… ultimately resulted or contributed to the death of the child.” In 2017, former Circuit Judge Belvin Perry Jr., who presided the trial, theorized that Anthony may have killed Caylee accidentally when she was using chloroform to calm her.

Many people still believe Anthony got away with murder. In response, Anthony told the Associated Press in 2017, “I don’t give a s—- about what anyone thinks about me, I never will. I’m OK with myself, I sleep pretty good at night.”

House said Anthony’s actions from over the years speak for themselves.

In this Feb. 13, 2017 photo, Casey Anthony poses for a portrait next to a photo of her daughter, Caylee, in her West Palm Beach, Fla., bedroom. In an exclusive interview with The Associated Press, Anthony claims the last time she saw Caylee she “believed that she was alive and that she was going to be OK.” (AP Photo/Joshua Replogle) (The Associated Press)

“She’s lying about everything,” he said. “And that interview, where she says she sleeps pretty good at night, are you kidding me? If I was put on trial for killing my kid, and I was acquitted because I didn’t do it, as soon as I walked out those doors at the courthouse, I would be on a manhunt trying to find out who killed my kid. I wouldn’t sleep again until I found out who killed my kid. That says everything you need to know.”

House said he hasn’t heard from Anthony. Several people from over the years have attempted to contact him on Facebook pretending to be her. Today he is a father, which has made him wonder about what really happened to the little girl he once knew.

“The people who will see this will learn that not only was Casey a real person but so are the people who were dragged into this,” he said. “We’re all just regular people that got pulled into a very, very tragic story, and it still affects us to this day. It’s been 10 years since the story broke… [but] it didn’t go away… This really happened to real people, and it still affects us to this day.”

“Casey Anthony: Her Friends Speak” airs Dec. 9 at 8 p.m. on Reelz. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Brutal murder during the holidays still haunts grieving mom 11 years later: ‘I felt so much darkness’

For Deb Tilson, the holidays will never be the same.

On Dec. 19, 2007, her daughter Kristine Larson was supposed to show up at her home in Minnesota to bake holiday cookies. Nearly seven hours later, the 19-year-old was found strangled in a burning car.

Larson’s ex-boyfriend, Zachery Matthews, who was also the father of her 2-year-old son, was convicted of her murder in 2008 and sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Tilson’s real-life nightmare is chronicled on Oxygen’s docuseries “Homicide for the Holidays,” which explores how brutal crimes across the country that occured between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. Tilson told Fox News she chose to come forward and relive the tragic tale for the series in hopes of raising awareness on domestic violence.

“My daughter was the youngest of four and very much the youngest by eight years,” said Tilson. “She was everyone’s baby in the family. She was that little spark who lit up our lives. She was very gregarious. A caregiver.

“She knew she had to make a better life for herself and her son. She had things put all in order. She had just gotten a job. In two weeks she would have graduated from bartending school and she was also enrolled in a nursing college.”

(Oxygen)

Larson began dating Matthews in 2004. In 2006, the couple welcomed a child named Darion. But in May 2007, Larson ended her relationship with Matthews. At the time of the murder, Larson and Matthews were no longer living together.

Tilson said that before the killing, Matthews, who endured a turbulent upbringing, was initially welcomed by the family.

“At the time, my husband was still mentoring him,” she explained. “We invited him to our home. We weren’t on bad terms with him… We just wanted to keep things on a low-key level with him.”

However, Tilson was horrified by what may have been occurring behind closed doors. While Larson didn’t share much about Matthews to her after their breakup, Tilson had learned through her daughter’s friends that she once reportedly remarked she had never been hit so hard by anyone in her entire life.

Tilson admitted that when her daughter went missing, she initially didn’t suspect Matthews.

“I just felt like for as much as he tried to get her back and wanted to be involved in her life — I was just in denial,” she explained. “I just thought anyone who knew her couldn’t do something like that to her. And I just felt that if it were him that meant their son wouldn’t have either parent. I was in denial. I felt like he really did love her and he wouldn’t do something like that to her. And that something like this couldn’t happen to this poor little boy.”

Kristine Larson with her son Darion. (Oxygen)

Pioneer Press reported that during the trial, a prosecutor contended that Matthews became enraged because Larson was a half-hour late in coming to his apartment to pick him up and take him to pick out Christmas gifts for their son.

The local newspaper shared that Matthews struck Larson with a blow that police said knocked her unconscious. He then tied the ends of a white shoelace into loops, treaded one loop through the other, placing it around her neck. Matthews pulled so tightly that the shoelace embedded in her skin.

Investigators believed Larson’s murder occurred in front of their son.

Pioneer Press added Matthews then carried Larson’s corpse out to her car, put her in the back seat and drove to a random alley. He then parked the car, tore some pages out of a phone book and set them on fire.

Before Matthews was suspected of murder, he was grieving with Larson’s family.

“I was just horrified,” said Tilson. “I felt so much darkness and sorrow… So many lives were lost over a poor decision made by someone who was obviously mentally ill.”

Zachery Matthews at Darion’s birth. — Oxygen

Tilson claimed Matthew has been diagnosed with several mental health diseases, including multiple personality disorder and schizophrenia, among others. She added his troubled childhood may have played a role in his heinous actions.

“I truly believe he figured, 'If I couldn’t have her, no one else could,'" she explained. “We were his family. We were all he knew. He was in foster care for up until 16 when he emancipated himself. I think he figured, if she was out of the picture, there would be no drama. He could still be a part of our family in his own twisted judgment.”

“And I think Kristine thought that with as much love as she could give him, she could build him back up and change the negative self-esteem and control issues he had,” she added.

In 2009, the South Washington County Bulletin reported Tilson and her family got custody of Darion. She said raising her grandson, who is now 12, has been bittersweet.

“He keeps Kristine’s memory alive,” she explained. “He has a lot of her mannerisms, her smile and her laugh. However, he is a product of his father as well. So those things rear its ugly head.

“He’s been diagnosed with tons of emotional disorders. Reactive attachment disorder, possibly bipolar, ADD. He’s prone to having blackout rages. He has a lot of issues with control because when he was a baby, he witnessed all of this. And he was powerless. … We’ve had a long road with him. He’s come a long way. And I gotta tell ya, we wouldn’t trade it for the world.”

Zachery and Darion. (Oxygen)

Tilson said the maximum security prison where Matthews is currently located is only a 20-minute drive from her home. However, she said it’s been a year since she had heard from Matthews, who reportedly insisted he was innocent up until two years ago.

And while Christmas is a joyous time for countless families, it’s a haunting reminder for Tilson.

“Our family traditions… have changed because of this,” she said. “Some of my kids are still very angry… We were the ideal family, like The Waltons. We all got together. Everybody laughed. We shared meals. I have my moments where I’m really strong and empowered. And then I have my moments where I’m just a mess… We don’t bake cookies anymore. The holidays just aren’ the same.”

Still, Tilson said she is determined to see Christmas in a different light. Her goal is to commemorate the season with those who have no one to share the holidays with.

But Tilson refuses to let her daughter be forgotten with time. She explained that right after Larson’s death, she was contacted by the Minnesota Coalition of Battered Women, which has helped her cope with her grief. She hopes her story, and Oxygen’s show, will help other young women get out of terrifying relationships before it’s too late.

“It’s the elephant in the room no one wants to talk about,” she said. “That’s why I got involved. Especially this time of year.”

(Oxygen)

"Homicide for the Holidays" airs Dec. 9th at 8 p.m. on Oxygen.

Officer recalls near-fatal shooting captured by body cam in doc: ‘I did think I was going to die’

Quincy Smith believed he was going to die on New Year’s Day 2016.

The 28-year-old, a police officer in small-town Estill, S.C., was called upon that morning to investigate a suspicious man wearing a camouflage hunting outfit attempting to snatch groceries from a convenience store.

Smith attempted to confront the reported robber who remained silent as he casually walked, holding a cellphone to his ear. His right hand remained concealed in his jacket as Smith threatened to tase him if he didn’t stop.

In a single sweeping motion, the man unveiled a 9mm pistol and fired away. One of the bullets pierced Smith’s neck and he tumbled to the ground. His left arm was also broken. Smith ran back to his cruiser and pleaded for help.

Bystander J. Tompkins spotted Smith struggling to breathe and tried to keep him calm while providing dispatch more details about the officer’s condition.

The shocking encounter is one of many chronicled in Investigation Discovery’s (ID) docuseries “Body Cam,” which takes a closer look at the daily lives of police officers throughout the country. Through actual body camera footage, the show aims to shed light on the dangerous situations and encounters those in law enforcement are faced with while attempting to protect the public.

The network hails the series as “the ultimate ride-along” for audiences who are curious about the real-life dangers of police work.

Smith recorded the horrifying shooting with his glasses, which were equipped with a camera. Audiences can hear Smith pleading for help as he bled profusely before telling a dispatcher, “Tell my family I love them.”

Gwendolyn Smith, mother of Officer Quincy Smith, in her interview. (ID)

Smith told Fox News he was shot three times and thought he wouldn’t make it.

“I did [think I was going to die],” said Smith. “I knew I got shot in the neck and I knew that’s a serious area where you don’t want to get shot at. Especially with that major artery in your neck. I thought he hit that. I really thought I was going to bleed out at any point in time. Yeah, I did think I wasn’t going to be able to see my family. That’s why I wanted to relay that message to my dispatch, to let them know I was thinking of them at that time.”

Smith admitted it was difficult to relive that day for “Body Cam.” Smith shared he was in total shock when the assailant shot him without uttering a single word.

“Where I work, when you’re trying to talk to somebody, they really don’t want to talk,” said Smith. “… At that time, it didn’t process as fast that something serious is going on. So initially no, I didn’t see anything strange. I was used to that. [You’re] used to people walking away from you, ignoring you… When I approached him to try and get him to stop… I didn’t process as fast when his hand was in his pocket what was about to happen.”

Charlene Cohen, cousin of Officer Smith, in her interview. — ID

And Smith wasn’t exactly a rookie when it came to the risks of law enforcement. His mother, Gwendoyn Smith, is a retired officer from the NYPD. She drove 13 hours non-stop to South Carolina after she received word of her son’s shooting to be by his side.

Smith started his own career with the University of South Carolina in 2013 and participated in the police academy through them. He transferred to Estill, a laid-back town of about 2,000 people in 2015. Smith found his glasses through Amazon that he reportedly purchased for $30.

“When I first got hired at the job, my chief said, ‘Look, be careful of the things you do and say out here. People like to complain a lot.’ And so, I believed it would help me in some court cases, such as little small traffic court cases. That’s why I equipped myself with them… [And] not a lot goes on here. We get a few serious calls here and there. But for the most part, I’m on patrol. I’m doing a little bit of traffic enforcement. It’s not a big town where we get a plethora of crime like other big agencies.”

Smith said the healing process involved grueling hours of painful physical therapy, as well as multiple surgeries to correct his broken arm.

Nearly two years later after the shooting, Smith testified in court against his shooter, 29-year-old Malcolm Antwan Orr, The Dayton Daily News reported, and the body camera footage served as evidence. A jury found Orr guilty of attempted murder and possession of a firearm in the commission of a violent crime. He was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Smith said he returned to work on Nov. 6, 2017 and now uses the footage to train other officers. Smith said his family wasn’t thrilled by the decision, but he wouldn’t have it any other way.

“I love what I do,” he explained. “I really appreciate everyone’s support. [But] somebody has to do this job. I think it’s in my blood. My family, they have roots in law enforcement… It’s just something I grew up around and I don’t see myself doing anything else. [The incident] is always in the back of your head, especially in this type of work. You just have to rely on your training and use whatever resources you got at the time to make the best of any situation. That’s the job. Pray it won’t happen again.”

Smith is also aware body cameras are a hot topic. In 2017, the ACLU pointed out a major study, which reported that wearing body cameras had no statistically significant effect on the number of use-of-force incidents and civilian complaints recorded. Smith still carries his glasses and said they’re absolutely essential.

Malcolm Antwann Orr was sentenced Wednesday to 35 years after shooting South Carolina Police Officer Quincy Smith. (14th Circuit Solicitor’s Office)

“From my experience, I believe body cameras are very beneficial,” he said. “People get to see what actually happened as it transpired from start to finish. I believe … it will help a lot in major cases.”

Ultimately, Smith hopes “Body Cam” will let audiences see the pros of these devices for themselves.

“I hope people get a lot of information,” he said. “They’ll get to see up close and personal what really happened, and understand what we go through as law enforcement officers, day in and day out on the job.”

"Body Cam" premieres Tuesday, Dec. 4 at 10 p.m. on ID.

Ronald Reagan’s daughter praises Monica Lewinsky for telling all in ‘The Clinton Affair’

Ronald and Nancy Reagan’s daughter, Patti Davis, is praising Monica Lewinsky for telling all in an A&E docuseries about her affair with Bill Clinton.

Earlier this month, the 45-year-old provided an in-depth reflection about the infamous saga in “The Clinton Affair,” a six-part series that examined the events that ultimately led to the president's impeachment on Dec. 19, 1998.

Davis, 66, wrote an op-ed for The Washington Post Wednesday in which she celebrated the former White House intern’s bravery for publicly speaking about her relationship with the then-president.

“At one point in the newly released A&E documentary series ‘The Clinton Affair,’ Monica Lewinsky says she now realizes part of her attraction to President Bill Clinton was that ‘someone who other people desired, desired me,” wrote Davis. “That’s an insight that one gains with time, with the grace of years. She was 22 years old when she fell hard for the most powerful man in the world; analyzing the situation assessing the risks, dangers, deceptions were not yet in her repertoire.

A photograph showing former White House intern Monica Lewinsky meeting President Bill Clinton at a White House function submitted as evidence in documents by the Starr investigation and released by the House Judicary committee September 21, 1998. (Courtesy of A&E)

MONICA LEWINSKY TELLS ALL

“She may have been of legal age, as both Bill and Hillary Clinton have repeatedly pointed out, but a 22-year-old is still locked in the fantasies and flights of imagination that define the very young. Powerful men who seek out vulnerable people to play with know that. They know in advance that the dance floor is theirs, they will always be leading, and whatever damage is done to their dance partner will never fall on them.”

In her piece, Davis admitted she could identify with Lewinsky’s story. She described how at age 17, she became involved with her high school English teacher while attending a co-ed boarding school in Arizona.

“With no town or city around us, we were our own little world,” she wrote. “In that small sequestered domain, my teacher — while not president of the United States — was very powerful. He was also handsome, athletic and creative, and he took a strong interest in my writing.”

In “The Clinton Affair,” Lewinsky revealed that she and Clinton initially shared a number of “flirtatious encounters” before things escalated in November 1995 during the federal government shutdown. Lewinsky claimed Clinton would also find excuses to see her and the two would plan on how they could accidentally bump into each other.

(Courtesy of A&E)

Davis shared her own relationship with the unnamed teacher, who was married with two children, took a similar route.

MONICA LEWINSKY: 'I WAS GUTTED'

“I remember clearly the moment it started,” she explained. “After he sent flirtatious signals, I wrote a poem that was, obliquely and rather delicately, about him. He was monitoring study hall one night, and I crossed the room, handed it to him and went back to my seat. The look he gave me after reading it set in motion the next two years of my life.”

“Our intimacy was never actually consummated — he resolutely stopped short of intercourse, just as Clinton apparently did — but there was enough intimacy to fuel my dreams and make me hinge my life on him,” added Davis.

Davis said that one of the moments in “The Clinton Affair” that impacted her was when Lewinsky was ambushed by FBI agents in 1998 and taken to a hotel room at the Ritz-Carlton. There, Lewinsky was held by prosecutors from the Office of the Independent Counsel until late in the night. The OIC was tipped by friend Linda Tripp, who revealed she knew about the affair, offering them taped conversations.

(Courtesy of A&E)

“I felt so much guilt,” said Lewinsky. “And I was terrified. There was a point for me… where I would be hysterically crying and then I would just shut down. And in the shut-down period, I remember looking out the window and thinking that the only way to fix this was to kill myself… I was scared. I was mortified and afraid of what this was going to do to my family. And I was still in love with Bill at the time. So I felt really responsible.”

Davis said her affair ended when she was 19. The pair were in the Midwest attending different colleges. The teacher was allegedly supposed to fly in and see Davis, but he never showed up.

“That night, when I knew he wasn’t going to come or call, I stood at a window looking out at the night, feeling that I had no reason to go on living,” wrote Davis.

Davis pointed out that Lewinsky’s story still resonates to women because powerful figures, whether in politics or not, can easily take advantage of those who are young and impressionable. She said many lessons can still be learned from Lewinsky’s experience.

Patti Davis, the daughter of Ronald and Nancy Reagan. (Getty Images)

“Those who think Lewinsky should ‘move on’ and let the past go need to understand something about powerful men who dance with young girls: The story doesn’t have an end,” Davis explained. “It evolves and shifts, but it remains. That man left his mark in the softest creases of your soul — the places where as a young girl you dreamed, and believed, and trusted. The scars he left in those tender places will always be there. But just because that’s part of your story, it doesn’t mean you have to let it victimize you.

“Lewinsky is showing us that — in front of the whole world. I don’t know if I’d had that much courage. Her story played out on the world stage 20 years ago, and she’s brave enough to walk back onto that same stage and say, ‘Now you need to listen to my truth.’ … there is one thing that powerful men who prey on young girls fail to understand: Those girls grow into women who are able to say, ‘You didn’t break me. I’m stronger than these scars. I’m stronger because of them.’”

Lewinsky, who for years kept quiet about her relationship with Clinton, came forward in February for a Vanity Fair essay in which she described her ordeal as “a living hell,” adding that the experience of being publicly outed and ostracized back them resulted in her being diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. She now serves as an anti-bullying advocate.

ID’s ‘Cold Valley’ doc explores unsolved Lewis Clark murders, disappearances: ‘You can only hide for so long’

Gloria Bobertz is on the hunt for a potential serial killer.

The cousin of 21-year-old murdered victim Kristina Nelson has chosen to come forward on a new Investigation Discovery docuseries titled “Cold Valley,” which explores a string of unsolved crimes and disappearances that occurred between 1979 and 1982 along the border between Idaho and Washington.

The series features emotional interviews with the families of those still missing or deceased, as well as a closer look at Asotin County Sheriff’s Detective Jackie Nichols’ work in revisiting Nelson's and the rest of cases.

At least five young people vanished in the small Lewis Clark Valley, the documentary claims, but only three of those bodies have been found. The other disappearances remained unsolved. While local police worked for years to find the culprit, the cases were shelved due to minimal evidence and leads.

Detective Nichols has been investigating the disappearance of 12-year-old Christina White — the first of the five in the area to go missing — since she became a detective in 2007 with the Asotin County Sheriff’s Department in Washington.

Christina White — ID

On April 28, 1979, White was at a friend’s house when she called her mother to say she felt overheated. Her mother advised her to cool down with a towel and then ride her bike home when she felt better. However, White never made it. Not long after, her school papers were found scattered on the outskirts of Asotin. She has never been found.

Then on June 26, 1981, University of Idaho student Kristin David was ready to embark on a lengthy bike ride from her school in Moscow, Idaho to the Lewis Clark Valley. The 22-year-old never arrived. On July 4th of that same year, a fisherman discovered a garbage bag floating in the Snake River. It contained David’s dismembered body.

The documentary claims Nichols has dedicated “countless hours” in pursuit of the truth, and all the clues point to one man. And while Nichols knows his identity, she cannot reveal it until she is sure she has the evidence to prosecute him in a court of law.

Investigators recover Kristin David’s remains from the Snake River. — ID

Bobertz, who has been leading her own investigation in hopes of finding the perpetrator, said she chose to participate in “Cold Valley” to raise awareness on Nelson’s unsolved murder.

“I wanted to do this because I knew it would get out there,” Bobertz told Fox News. “I was really excited that law enforcement would be involved. I thought that was absolutely wonderful. That’s why I decided I wanted to partake and be a representative of our family.”

Asotin County Det. Jackie Nichols. — ID

Lewiston, Idaho’s KLEW TV reported Nelson and her 18-year-old stepsister, Jacqueline “Brandy” Miller, decided to walk to the grocery store on September 12, 1982, only to never be seen alive again. Both women were attending Lewis Clark State College and worked at the Lewiston Civic Theatre.

“Kristina was probably one of the kindest, sweetest people you would ever want to meet,” said Bobertz, 57. “She wanted to become a veterinarian. That change and she decided to go to school and become an accountant. But she was also quite involved with her artwork and she was a really good artist. She had some of her paintings displayed at the Lewiston Civic Theater.”

On the same night Nelson and Miller went missing, authorities learned Steven Pearsall, 35, who also worked at the Lewiston Civic Theater and was friends with the women, also vanished. KLEW TV shared on the night Pearsall disappeared, he had gone to the theater to practice his clarinet and do laundry. Investigators found his car, paycheck and instrument, which his family said he would never abandon.

“They knew each other through the theater,” said Bobertz about the trio. “He was like a big brother.”

Bobertz added her family didn’t know what to make of the sudden disappearances. However, Bobertz said she had a sinking feeling she would never speak to Nelson again.

Steven Pearsall — ID

“When I heard she had gone missing, I knew she was gone,” said Bobertz. “I just knew it. I felt it. I can’t even begin to tell you how much it impacted our family. Families dissolve because of situations like this.”

On March 19, 1984, the skeletonized remains of Nelson and Miller were found in a remote area near Kendrick, Idaho. Lengths of cord were also discovered nearby.

“They were found outside of Kendrick, Idaho right off the side of the highway as it goes off the grade there,” Nichols told KLEW TV. “It was as though they were probably tossed off the side of the grade and rolled down and stopped at the base of a tree.”

Bobertz said she still vividly remembers the day her family got the phone call.

“I remember exactly where I was standing when we were told,” she recalled. “I could even tell you what I was wearing. It was such a shock to know that she was gone in such a violent way. That somebody who was so kind and sweet could have her life end by murder. And Brandy, she’s family. No matter what, I wanted to know why. I guess that’s what has taken me on my journey to find those answers. Because it was a loss of innocence for me. Bad things do happen to young people. We’re not invincible.”

Kristin David (ID)

Pearsall still remains missing. Nichols told Investigation Discovery she believed Pearsall is a victim because “he doesn’t have the personality, really, that fits the profile of someone that would commit the homicides, and by all accounts, he was kind of a [milder], low-key type of person, pretty passive, not prone to anger.”

Nichols believes Pearsall may have “walked in on something horrific happening that he was a witness to, and that was the end of his life right there.”

The network added that a person of interest associated with White’s 1979’s disappearance reportedly admitted to police he was working in the theater around the same time and on that same fateful night all three people vanished. However, he insisted he hadn’t heard or seen anything out of the ordinary.

The person of interest also refused to take a lie-detector test at the time on his attorney’s advice and later moved to North Carolina in the late 1990s.

KLEW TV revealed the Lewiston Civic Theatre has since been condemned and at risk of falling apart.

Brandy Miller (ID)

Bobertz said lack of evidence has made it difficult for authorities to track down answers. However, she’s hoping DNA could finally crack these cold cases. She also suspects there may be more victims.

“I think the person of interest — he committed the crime in the valley ’79-82,” she explained. “And then it would have been harder for him to hide. So I think he went to other areas because he’s extremely intelligent… He would definitely remember the lay of the land.”

In 2017, The Spokesman-Review reported a cold case unit of investigators, prosecutors and staff were formed to review the case and evidence that was collected.

Bobertz is hopeful the documentary will compel those who may have information to come forward with tips. She is also certain that someday, she will learn what really happened to the two young women in her life.

“I do believe I will get answers,” she said. “It may not be in the near future, but I think there will be answers. You can only hide for so long. Your past will come up and bite you. So I always hold out hope that there will be answers and there will be justice.”

Gloria Bobertz has devoted thousands of hours to tracking down leads related to the murder of her cousin Kristina Nelson. — ID

"Cold Valley" premieres Thursday, November 29 at 10 p.m. on ID.

OJ Simpson ‘didn’t act alone’ in murders, ex-manager claims

O.J. Simpson "didn't act alone" when he allegedly murdered his ex-wife and her friend decades ago, according to his former manager.

The former NFL star was not solely "involved" in the deaths of Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend, Ronald Goldman, but rather he "had at least one accomplice," Norman Pardo told the New York Post's Page Six in an article published Tuesday.

SACHA BARON COHEN CHARACTER INTERVIEWS OJ SIMPSON ON 'WHO IS AMERICA' AND JOKES ABOUT KILLING WOMEN

For years, Pardo has reportedly been working on a documentary about the 1994 slayings and will next week pitch it to various cable and streaming networks "to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the homicides."

“For the first time, the most thorough investigation into the murder ever conducted will be shared with America,” Pardo said. “We have assembled a team of internationally renowned criminal investigators, experts and lawyers."

BILL COSBY GETS PRISON WARNING FROM O.J. SIMPSON

Pardo said those involved in the documentary "believe they can not only prove Simpson was involved in their deaths," but that someone else was involved, too.

The former manager claims to be friends with the former football star.

New special shows O.J. Simpson’s ‘lost confession’

O.J. Simpson’s 2006 ‘if I did it’ interview to air in ‘O.J. Simpson: The Lost Confession?’

Simpson, 71, was released from a Nevada prison in October 2017 after serving nine years for a botched 2007 hotel-room heist in Las Vegas that brought the conviction and prison time he avoided in the killings of his wife and her friend after his 1995 acquittal.

Simpson fell from grace when he was arrested in the slayings, coming after the famous Ford Bronco chase on California freeways. His subsequent trial became a live-TV sensation that fascinated viewers with its testimony about a bloody glove that didn't fit and unleashed furious debate over race, police and celebrity justice.

A jury swiftly acquitted him, but two years later, Simpson was found liable in civil court for the killings and ordered to pay $33.5 million to survivors, including his children and Goldman's family.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Mark Fuhrman unveils analysis on Kennedy’s assassination on Fox Nation’s ‘The Fuhrman Diaries’

John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963, while traveling through Dallas, Texas in an open-top convertible, forever shaping America. Former Los Angeles detective Mark Fuhrman is hoping to share his insight nearly 60 years later after the horrific event took the life of the young president.

The 66-year-old is the host of Fox Nation’s new docu-series “The Fuhrman Diaries,” where he reveals private thoughts and analysis on criminal cases that have defined the last half-century. Furhman admitted the shocking televised killing of Kennedy is a case he has obsessed over for years and has long wondered about the identity of the president's assassin.

The New York Times previously reported Kennedy died on November 22 of a wound in the brain caused by a rifle bullet that was fired at him. Vice President Lyndon Johnson, who was riding in the third car behind Kennedy’s, was sworn in as the 36th President of the United States, a mere 99 minutes after Kennedy’s death. Kennedy’s wife, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, was present, still wearing her blood-splattered pink suit.

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Shortly after the assassination, the New York Times added that Lee Harvey Oswald, who once defected the Soviet Union and had been active in the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, was arrested by Dallas police. On November 24, Oswald was fatally shot at age 24 by Dallas nightclub operator Jack Rubinstein while police attempted to move him from the city jail to the county jail. But for years, many have speculated that someone else, or even multiple people, were the ones truly involved in Kennedy’s killing.

“Growing up, I followed the case, listened to the criticism,” Furhman explained in the documentary. “Was Lee Harvey Oswald a good enough marksman to make those shots with a cheap Italian army surplus rifle? Could he have fired three shots so quickly? Why were government investigation shrouded in so much secrecy? What were they afraid of? Were they trying to hide something? The question I kept coming back to was the single bullet theory. And the magic bullet. I read… the report. And I really didn’t buy it. And I wasn’t alone.”

Fox Nation is a streaming subscription service you can access through your phone, tablet, computer and select TV devices. It is a members-only destination for Fox News' most passionate fans featuring exclusive new content.

OJ Simpson ‘didn’t act alone’ in murders, ex-manager claims

O.J. Simpson "didn't act alone" when he allegedly murdered his ex-wife and her friend decades ago, according to his former manager.

The former NFL star was not solely "involved" in the deaths of Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend, Ronald Goldman, but rather he "had at least one accomplice," Norman Pardo told the New York Post's Page Six in an article published Tuesday.

SACHA BARON COHEN CHARACTER INTERVIEWS OJ SIMPSON ON 'WHO IS AMERICA' AND JOKES ABOUT KILLING WOMEN

For years, Pardo has reportedly been working on a documentary about the 1994 slayings and will next week pitch it to various cable and streaming networks "to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the homicides."

“For the first time, the most thorough investigation into the murder ever conducted will be shared with America,” Pardo said. “We have assembled a team of internationally renowned criminal investigators, experts and lawyers."

BILL COSBY GETS PRISON WARNING FROM O.J. SIMPSON

Pardo said those involved in the documentary "believe they can not only prove Simpson was involved in their deaths," but that someone else was involved, too.

The former manager claims to be friends with the former football star.

New special shows O.J. Simpson’s ‘lost confession’

O.J. Simpson’s 2006 ‘if I did it’ interview to air in ‘O.J. Simpson: The Lost Confession?’

Simpson, 71, was released from a Nevada prison in October 2017 after serving nine years for a botched 2007 hotel-room heist in Las Vegas that brought the conviction and prison time he avoided in the killings of his wife and her friend after his 1995 acquittal.

Simpson fell from grace when he was arrested in the slayings, coming after the famous Ford Bronco chase on California freeways. His subsequent trial became a live-TV sensation that fascinated viewers with its testimony about a bloody glove that didn't fit and unleashed furious debate over race, police and celebrity justice.

A jury swiftly acquitted him, but two years later, Simpson was found liable in civil court for the killings and ordered to pay $33.5 million to survivors, including his children and Goldman's family.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Monica Lewinsky reveals Bill Clinton urged her to lie under oath: ‘I did feel uncomfortable about it’

Monica Lewinsky has opened up for the first time about how Bill Clinton convinced her "to break the law" and lie under oath.

In the final part of the A&E docuseries "The Clinton Affair," Lewinsky revealed that Clinton convinced her to deny the affair if she was called to testify in the Paula Jones case. The 45-year-old recalled the former president telling her that she could avoid being deposed if she denied the affair in an affidavit.

Lewinsky said that Clinton had called her at 2:30 in the morning to let her know that she was on the witness list for the Paula Jones case.

MONICA LEWINSKY SAYS SHE WAS 'GUTTED' AFTER BILL CLINTON LABELED HER 'THAT WOMAN' IN DOC: 'I FELT ANGER'

"I was petrified. I was frantic about my family and this becoming public," Lewinsky tearfully recalled. "Thankfully, Bill helped me lock myself back from that and he said I could probably sign an affidavit to get out of it, and he didn't even know if a 100 percent I would be subpoenaed."

She was subpoenaed a few days later.

And though she clarified that Clinton never said the words "you're going to have to lie here," Lewinsky pointed out that he also never said "we're going to have to tell the truth."

(Courtesy of A&E)

After being subpoenaed, the former White House staffer decided to talk to attorney Vernon Jordan, a close friend of Clinton. In the documentary, Lewinsky claims that she managed to secure a meeting with Jordan on her own and from that meeting, she was introduced to lawyer Frank Carter.

"Frank Carter explained to me if I'd signed an affidavit denying having had an intimate relationship with the president it might mean I wouldn't have to be deposed in the Paula Jones case," she recounted. "I did feel uncomfortable about it but I felt it was the right thing to do, ironically, right? So, the right thing to do, to break the law."

Following her decision to sign the affidavit, Clinton called Lewinsky to the White House for a somewhat private Christmas celebration.

'LOST TAPES' FROM BILL CLINTON, MONICA LEWINSKY YEARS REEMERGE IN NEW DOCUMENTARY

"This is the first time I met Buddy, the dog, and we kind of all played around with Buddy in the office and then we went into the back study and we had a Christmas kiss," the Vanity Fair writer revealed.

She continued: "Over the summer he had gone to Martha's Vineyard and he brought back a bunch of different things. He had this big canvas bag from the Black Dog. This marble bear, sunglasses. It was the most presents he'd given me at one time. He knew the subpoena was gonna ask to produce certain items and yet he was giving me more gifts. He clearly still trusted me."

Lewinsky added that at the time, she gave the president's gifts to his secretary for safekeeping and to avoid possible seizure.

Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. (Getty)

While things seemed to be getting back to normal, it wasn't long before everything went downhill for the former White House intern.

Once it was discovered that Lewinsky was having an affair with Clinton, the FBI forced the young staffer to be part of the bureau investigation into the president.

Scared and unsure what to do, the activist recalled how the FBI threatened to prosecute her mother and said that both women could face up to 27 years in prison for lying about the affair.

A then-24-year-old Lewinsky demanded to call her mother while she was being held inside a Ritz Carlton hotel room for what was a 12-hour interrogation.

"You're 24, you don't need to call your mommy, you need to make a decision about what to do," Lewinsky recalled one agent told her.

Unwilling to immediately cooperate with the FBI, the young staffer finally told them that she demanded to speak to either her mother or her lawyer before making the decision to wear a wire and have her personal life monitored and tapped.

But once the word of the affair was out in the open, Lewinsky admitted that the scandal was almost too much for her to handle and revealed that she contemplated committing suicide.

"There was a point for me somewhere within these first several hours where I would be hysterically crying and then I would just shut down," she admitted. "And in the shutdown period, I just remember looking out the window and thinking the only way to fix this is to kill myself."

An FBI agent who was involved in the case corroborated her emotions at the time and said she was "alternating between being hysterical, being angry, being abusive."

"I just felt terrible … and I was scared … and I was mortified,' she said while trying to regain her composure," Lewinsky sobbed in her documentary confessional.

She also confessed that the taxing events of the scandal are what led her to confide in Linda Tripp, who eventually drew the prosecution to the fact that Clinton was indeed having an affair.

You can find Morgan M. Evans on Twitter @themizfactor.