Earthquake, magnitude 4.4, rattles Tennessee, Georgia

A 4.4-magnitude earthquake was reported in Tennessee early Wednesday, officials said. The quake hit about six miles north of Decatur around 4:15 a.m., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The shaking was felt by residents as far away as Atlanta — about 149 miles south of the epicenter. A 3.3 magnitude aftershock struck about 10 … Continue reading “Earthquake, magnitude 4.4, rattles Tennessee, Georgia”

A 4.4-magnitude earthquake was reported in Tennessee early Wednesday, officials said.

The quake hit about six miles north of Decatur around 4:15 a.m., according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The shaking was felt by residents as far away as Atlanta — about 149 miles south of the epicenter.

A 3.3 magnitude aftershock struck about 10 minutes later, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information reported.

Signs of major damage or injuries have yet to be reported.

The 4.4 was the second strongest quake on record to strike eastern Tennessee, according to the USGS. The strongest ever registered was a 4.7 magnitude near Maryville in 1973.

Several smaller earthquakes have rippled through Georgia in recent years, including a 1.9 magnitude in Walker County in August and a 2.7 quake in Catoosa County in January, WSB-TV reported. Last year, a 2.3 rattled the small community of Trion in Chatooga County.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Alaska hit by dozens of small earthquakes in wake of Friday’s major temblor

Dozens of small temblors shook parts of Alaska Saturday, a day after a powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake buckled roads, damaged buildings, knocked out power and frayed nerves, according to reports.

There were no reports of deaths or serious injuries following Friday’s quake near Anchorage and a 5.7 aftershock minutes later.

"It was probably a good 30 to 40 seconds of slow-motion disaster," said Chris Riekena, an engineer with the Alaska Department of Transportation.

Aerial photo shows damage on Vine Road, south of Wasilla, Alaska, after earthquake Friday. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)

Riekena was on a freeway driving his seven-year-old son to school when the rumbling started and the road started splitting apart.

ALASKA EARTHQUAKE ROCKS ANCHORAGE BUILDINGS, BUCKLES ROADS, SHOCKING VIDEOS AND PHOTOS REVEAL

"Thankfully I pulled over when I did," he said. "I've walked around the site enough over the last few hours that I've replayed that a few times."

About 30,000 customers were without power as utility companies scrambled to restore the lights, USA Today reported.

Enstar Natural Gas Company was adding workers from Michigan to help with recovery and survey 3,488 miles of pipeline for leaks, according to the paper.

Aerial photo of damage from earthquake on Vine Road, south of Wasilla, Alaska. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)

Gov. Bill Walker issued a disaster declaration.

President Trump also issued an emergency declaration for Alaska.

ALASKA EARTHQUAKE CLAIMED NO LIVES, OFFICIALS SAY, BUT INFRASTRUCTURE DAMAGE IS ANOTHER STORY

Alaska state seismologist Mike West said Friday’s earthquake was the “most significant” to strike Anchorage since a 9.2-magnitute quake in 1964 that killed 129 people—the most powerful ever recorded in the U.S.

"There is quite a bit of damage across Anchorage," West said in a Facebook Live interview, according to the paper. “I’m not aware of large-scale building collapses, but I think it’s safe to say there are thousands of homes and businesses and buildings that were damaged in some fashion, be it a deck that slid downhill, a cracked foundation, a gas line disconnected from the house."

A ramp from International Airport Road to Minnesota Drive was damaged in an earthquake on Friday. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)

The state averages 40,000 earthquakes a year, with more large quakes than the 49 other states combined. Southern Alaska has a high risk of earthquakes because the Earth's plates slide past each other under the region.

Alaska has been hit by a number of powerful quakes over 7.0 in recent decades, including a 7.9 last January southeast of Kodiak Island. But it is rare for a quake this big to strike so close to such a heavily populated area.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Alaska earthquake rocks Anchorage buildings, buckles roads, shocking videos and photos reveal

A powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake shook buildings — cracking drywalls and sending items flying off shelves — and buckled major roadways in Anchorage Friday morning. There were no reported injuries.

Residents quickly took to social media shortly after the seismic event to share shocking photos of the destruction, including collapsed ceiling tiles, buckled roads and materials inside homes in disarray. One image showed a car stranded on an island of pavement, surrounded by cavernous cracks where the earthquake split the road.

"This earthquake straight cracked my school in half," Josh Bierma, a student in Anchorage, tweeted.

LARGE ALASKA EARTHQUAKE JOLTS RESIDENTS, SHAKES BUILDINGS

An Anchorage news anchor shared a picture of overturned chairs and wooden boards spilled across the floor.

"[The] newsroom felt the blow of the earthquake this morning," KTVA reporter Cassie Schirm said, noting power was out on the east side of the city.

Cereal boxes and packages of batteries littered the floor of a grocery store, and picture frames and mirrors were knocked from living room walls.

"It was anarchy,” Brandon Slaton, a resident of nearby Kenai, Alaska, told The Associated Press. “There's no pictures left on the walls, there's no power, there's no fish tank left. Everything that's not tied down is broke."

Anchorage Police Chief Justin Doll was recounting reports that parts of a scenic highway that heads from Anchorage toward mountains and glaciers have sunken and "completely disappeared."

Here's a look at some of the destruction residents have shared online so far.

Fox News’ Greg Norman and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Jennifer Earl is an SEO editor for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter @jenearlyspeakin.

Over 170 hurt after magnitude 6.3 earthquake rattles western Iran

A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck western Iran near its border with Iraq on Sunday night, injuring over 170 people and sending fearful residents running into the street, authorities said.

The temblor hit near Sarpol-e Zahab in Iran's Kermanshah province, which was the epicenter of an earthquake last year that killed over 600 people and where some still remain homeless.

Morteza Salimi of Iran's Red Crescent told Iranian state television that 171 people were injured, most of them slightly. Kermanshah provincial Gov. Houshang Bazvand similarly said there were injuries, but few people hospitalized.

Authorities said six rescue teams were immediately deployed after the quake stopped and the country's army and its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard were responding.

The location of the earthquake in Western Iran on Sunday. (USGS)

Officials reported damage at buildings both in town and in rural Kermanshah, as well as to some roadways. The temblor also downed powerlines and caused power outages into the night as temperatures hovered around 46 degrees Fahrenheit.

The quake struck just after 8 p.m. in Iran, meaning most were still awake at the time and able to quickly flee.

The 6.3 earthquake had a depth of 6.2 miles, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Iran state TV gave the depth as 3.1 miles. Such shallow earthquakes have broader damage.

The earthquake was felt as far away as the Iraqi capital of Baghdad.

Earthquake kills over 400, injures thousands in Iraq-Iran

Kitty Logan reports on the search for survivors.

Iran is located on major seismic faults and experiences an earthquake per day on average. In 2003, a magnitude 6.6 earthquake flattened the historic city of Bam in southern Iran, killing 26,000 people.

Last year's earthquake near Sarpol-e Zahab, a predominantly Kurdish town, had a magnitude of 7.3 and injured more than 9,000 people. The region, nestled in the Zagros Mountains, largely rebuilt in recent decades after Iran and Iraq's ruinous 1980s war, saw many buildings collapse or sustain major damage in the 2017 quake.

Sarpol-e Zahab, some 325 miles southwest of the Iranian capital of Tehran, suffered half of the 2017 temblor's casualties.

Over 170 hurt after magnitude 6.3 earthquake rattles western Iran

A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck western Iran near its border with Iraq on Sunday night, injuring over 170 people and sending fearful residents running into the street, authorities said.

The temblor hit near Sarpol-e Zahab in Iran's Kermanshah province, which was the epicenter of an earthquake last year that killed over 600 people and where some still remain homeless.

Morteza Salimi of Iran's Red Crescent told Iranian state television that 171 people were injured, most of them slightly. Kermanshah provincial Gov. Houshang Bazvand similarly said there were injuries, but few people hospitalized.

Authorities said six rescue teams were immediately deployed after the quake stopped and the country's army and its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard were responding.

The location of the earthquake in Western Iran on Sunday. (USGS)

Officials reported damage at buildings both in town and in rural Kermanshah, as well as to some roadways. The temblor also downed powerlines and caused power outages into the night as temperatures hovered around 46 degrees Fahrenheit.

The quake struck just after 8 p.m. in Iran, meaning most were still awake at the time and able to quickly flee.

The 6.3 earthquake had a depth of 6.2 miles, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Iran state TV gave the depth as 3.1 miles. Such shallow earthquakes have broader damage.

The earthquake was felt as far away as the Iraqi capital of Baghdad.

Earthquake kills over 400, injures thousands in Iraq-Iran

Kitty Logan reports on the search for survivors.

Iran is located on major seismic faults and experiences an earthquake per day on average. In 2003, a magnitude 6.6 earthquake flattened the historic city of Bam in southern Iran, killing 26,000 people.

Last year's earthquake near Sarpol-e Zahab, a predominantly Kurdish town, had a magnitude of 7.3 and injured more than 9,000 people. The region, nestled in the Zagros Mountains, largely rebuilt in recent decades after Iran and Iraq's ruinous 1980s war, saw many buildings collapse or sustain major damage in the 2017 quake.

Sarpol-e Zahab, some 325 miles southwest of the Iranian capital of Tehran, suffered half of the 2017 temblor's casualties.

Over 170 hurt after magnitude 6.3 earthquake rattles western Iran

A magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck western Iran near its border with Iraq on Sunday night, injuring over 170 people and sending fearful residents running into the street, authorities said.

The temblor hit near Sarpol-e Zahab in Iran's Kermanshah province, which was the epicenter of an earthquake last year that killed over 600 people and where some still remain homeless.

Morteza Salimi of Iran's Red Crescent told Iranian state television that 171 people were injured, most of them slightly. Kermanshah provincial Gov. Houshang Bazvand similarly said there were injuries, but few people hospitalized.

Authorities said six rescue teams were immediately deployed after the quake stopped and the country's army and its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard were responding.

The location of the earthquake in Western Iran on Sunday. (USGS)

Officials reported damage at buildings both in town and in rural Kermanshah, as well as to some roadways. The temblor also downed powerlines and caused power outages into the night as temperatures hovered around 46 degrees Fahrenheit.

The quake struck just after 8 p.m. in Iran, meaning most were still awake at the time and able to quickly flee.

The 6.3 earthquake had a depth of 6.2 miles, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Iran state TV gave the depth as 3.1 miles. Such shallow earthquakes have broader damage.

The earthquake was felt as far away as the Iraqi capital of Baghdad.

Earthquake kills over 400, injures thousands in Iraq-Iran

Kitty Logan reports on the search for survivors.

Iran is located on major seismic faults and experiences an earthquake per day on average. In 2003, a magnitude 6.6 earthquake flattened the historic city of Bam in southern Iran, killing 26,000 people.

Last year's earthquake near Sarpol-e Zahab, a predominantly Kurdish town, had a magnitude of 7.3 and injured more than 9,000 people. The region, nestled in the Zagros Mountains, largely rebuilt in recent decades after Iran and Iraq's ruinous 1980s war, saw many buildings collapse or sustain major damage in the 2017 quake.

Sarpol-e Zahab, some 325 miles southwest of the Iranian capital of Tehran, suffered half of the 2017 temblor's casualties.