Woman threatened with fine after inviting lonely neighbors to Christmas dinner

Scrooge council chiefs have been blasted for threatening to fine a kind-hearted mom after she put up posters inviting lonely people to enjoy a free Christmas dinner. Mo Fayose, 44, was shocked when she received an email from town hall chiefs accusing her of illegal fly-posting. She put up the notices around the neighborhood in … Continue reading “Woman threatened with fine after inviting lonely neighbors to Christmas dinner”

Scrooge council chiefs have been blasted for threatening to fine a kind-hearted mom after she put up posters inviting lonely people to enjoy a free Christmas dinner.

Mo Fayose, 44, was shocked when she received an email from town hall chiefs accusing her of illegal fly-posting.

She put up the notices around the neighborhood in Basford, Nottingham, inviting people to get in touch with her if they were on their own over the festive season.

The mental health nurse has hosted Christmas dinners for vulnerable and lonely people for the last three years.

She started by opening her home to five guests but the free event is now so popular she hires out two halls to accommodate more than 100 people.

The single mom-of-two and a team of volunteers cook a three-course dinner, complete with crackers and decorations.

She spends the year raising around £3,000 ($3,756 USD) to buy the food and decorations and the cost of hiring the community centers in Basford for the festive lunch.

Mo who hosts Christmas dinner for about 100 people says she is pleased a council has backed down on threats to fine her over her flyers for the event. (SWNS)

But when she put up posters for this year’s event, she was stunned when a Nottingham City Council community protection officer ordered her to remove them “immediately”.

Fayose removed the flyers but blasted the council for taking a “heavy handed approach” to her free event.

She said, "The posters are really important; it's the way to get it to those who are not using social media.

“I was really shocked when I got the email telling me I was breaking the law. I just wanted to help people who were on their own at Christmas.

“This was the first time I had received an email like this from the council.

“I started putting up the flyers in November and the council emailed me on December 4.

“The email said, ‘We know what you are doing is good but it is classed as fly-posting’ which is a problem. Therefore I would ask you to take it down otherwise you would be fined.'

“It’s just crazy, it broke me down.

“I put the posters all over Basford so everyone could see them.

“I put it online but not everyone is on social media especially older people who are sometimes the most lonely in our society."

Christmas Day 2016, Ms Fayose and a team of volunteers cooked three courses for the lonely at Christmas. (SWNS)

Fayose, who is separated from her husband and lives with her 19-year-old daughter Ebbyy and 15-year-old son Jebediah put on the Christmas dinners three years ago.

She said, "A patient on the ward where I was doing my mental health training told me that they don’t celebrate Christmas because they had no one to spend it with.

“That really got to me and I thought there must be something I can do to help people like this.

"I just thought I would invite people to my home on Christmas Day and make dinner for them.

“I posted an invitation online expecting five or so people to reply but I was amazed when more than 100 people said they'd love to come along.

“I had over 130 people come in 2016 and had to move the lunch to a community center.

“The year after was even more popular and this year we're hiring out two halls of a community center to fit everyone in.

"I just hope enough people saw the poster before I had to take them down. I've had lots of people replying to me but there are still places available.

"I would hate it if anyone missed out and spent the day on their own just because the council ordered me to take them down.

“The lunch is a really happy event and everyone gets on and enjoys eating and celebrating together.

 Mo Fayose raises money for the gathering herself, to help combat "festive loneliness." (SWNS)

“Through my work as a mental health nurse I know that festive loneliness is real. I just wanted to do my small part in helping people come together.

“We’ve got a lot of food including turkeys, beef, chicken, canapes, Christmas pudding and minces pies and wine.

“It’s become so popular, I’ve not just had people from the local area come but also people from Derby, Mansfield and Scotland come.

"People of all ages come along too, we get young people and elderly people.

"Plus those who find it tough financial at this time of year too.

"This time of year can cause severe loneliness.

“All I wanted to do is just spread the Christmas spirit to those who desperately need it.”

The council have since decided to take no action regarding the posters and deemed the incident a “genuine misunderstanding”.

Nottingham City Councillor Linda Woodings said, "It is a really worthy cause and there has been a genuine misunderstanding.

"The council always promotes the importance of looking after each other and this includes encouraging people to cook a Christmas dinner for neighbors who may be on their own."

Ohio State gets bacon vending machine on campus

Ohio State University students can easily bring home the bacon thanks to a new vending machine that popped up before the semester’s end.

Courtesy of the Ohio Pork Council, the vending machine is going hog wild for bacon, offering strips and bits for just $1 until Dec. 13.

Located in the Animal Sciences building at the school’s College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, profits from the vending machine will benefit the meat science program, according to the Ohio Pork Council. Students in the meat science program are also responsible for re-stocking the machines.

JAPANESE VENDING MACHINE DISPENSES ENTIRE FRESH-BAKED PIZZAS FOR UNDER $12

“The Bacon Vending Machine is a unique and fun way for the Ohio Pork Council to support Ohio State students and promote the pork industry at the same time,” Dave Shoup, the council’s president-elect, said in a statement provided to Fox News.

The porky contents were donated by Hormel, Sugardale and Smithfield.

Kaitlyn Schallhorn is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter: @K_Schallhorn.

Kate Middleton reveals William’s ‘nightmare’ eating habit

Royals — they’re just like us.

On an official royal engagement in Cyprus, the Duchess of Cambridge reportedly revealed that her husband, Prince William, had one “nightmare” of an eating habit that drives her mad — eating pizza on the couch.

Prince William and Kate Duchess of Cambridge pose with Service Personnel during a Christmas party on RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus, as the Royal couple visit the Sergent’s mess to hand out gifts Wednesday Dec. 5, 2018. The RAF Akrotiri is the home of the Cyprus Operations Support Unit which supplies support to operations in the region to protect the UK’s strategic interests.  (AP)

On Dec. 5, the future king and queen consort visited the RAF Akrotiri air base in Cyprus, where they spread holiday cheer to servicemembers and their families, People reports. The itinerary included the opening of a new recreation center, which features some bright new yellow couches.

KATE MIDDLETON WEARS 'FAVORITE' TIARA, ALSO LOVED BY PRINCESS DIANA, TO ROYAL EVENT

Britain’s Prince William, right, and his wife Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, stand outside the mess hall at the Akrotiri Royal Air Force base, near the south coastal city of Limassol, Cyprus, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.  (AP)

Taking note of the new furniture, Prince William, a veteran himself, reportedly told those enlisted to “Keep the pizza off the sofas!”

Duchess Kate is said to have quickly fired back, telling her husband “You’re a nightmare with that!” as per People.

Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, greets family members of personnel at the Akrotiri Royal Air Force base, near the south coastal city of Limassol, Cyprus, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.  (AP)

William, age 36, has previously quipped offhandedly about his favorite foods – which he’s said include Nando’s (an international Mozambique-Portuguese-inspired fast-food chain), curry, and "medium rare" steak – and also, apparently, pizza!

Taking note of the new furniture, Prince William, a veteran himself, reportedly told those enlisted to “Keep the pizza off the sofas!”  (Getty)

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Janine Puhak is an editor for Fox News Lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter at @JaninePuhak

Former Red Robin burger chain CEO dead from self-inflicted gunshot, reports say

Michael Snyder, the former CEO of the Red Robin Gourmet Burgers and Brews restaurant chain, died of a self-inflicted gunshot Sunday at his home in Washington state, according to reports.

Snyder, 68, shot himself in the head while sitting on a bench in the front yard of his home in Yakima, the New York Post reported.

Yakima police said they do not release information pertaining to suicides, interim Chief Gary Jones told the Yakima Herald.

“And we have not found any criminal conduct,” he said.

Snyder and his brother became the first Red Robin franchisees in 1979 when they opened their first restaurant in Yakima.

The pair continued to expand and eventually opened 14 restaurants in Washington, Colorado and Idaho. Snyder became president and CEO in 1996 and in 2000, respectively.

He later merged his Snyder Group Inc. with the Red Robin parent company, the New York Daily News reported.

In 2005, Snyder was forced out after being forced to make restitution on $1.25 million in unauthorized perks, including use of a corporate jet.

He resigned as chairman, CEO and president, but served as a consultant during the leadership transition period. In 2007, he agreed to pay $150,000 in civil penalties to settle charges that he misrepresented travel costs and business expenses, according to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

"During Mike’s time with the Red Robin family, he made many contributions to the growth of our brand, including his role as an early franchisee and, some years later, his leadership role at the company,” a Red Robin spokesman said in a statement, according to the Post.

The restaurant chain has about 566 locations in North America.

82-year-old takeout delivery driver voted best in Britain

Dapper great-grandad Brian Loughans is believed to be Britain’s oldest takeout delivery driver – at the grand age of 82. Brian works on average 18 hours per week and hasn’t missed a single shift since he started the job around two-and-a-half-years-ago.

The Royal Air Force veteran and former cab driver delivers takeaways from the Indian restaurant in his Vauxhall Vectra in all weather, dressed smartly in shirt and tie – and without a GPS navigation system.

He tends to cover the West Yorkshire, England area but 18 months found himself driving a staggering 112 miles down to West Bromwich for a regular customer.

He tends to cover the West Yorkshire, England area but 18 months found himself driving a staggering 112 miles down to West Bromwich for a regular customer. (SWNS)

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The widower, whose wife of 50-years Margaret, 69, died several years ago, has no plans to put his feet up anytime soon because the job keeps him busy. He actually started working for Kiplings restaurant in Sowerby Bridge, near Halifax, West Yorks., almost by chance. Brian was already known in the area for going door to door with Yellow Pages and the restaurant asked if he could deliver menus.

One night when he popped in for some a driver had rung in sick so he was asked if he could deliver meals too, and the rest is history. In recognition of his tireless work, Brian was recently voted the best takeaway delivery driver in Britain.

In recognition of his tireless work, Brian was recently voted the best takeaway delivery driver in Britain. (SWNS)

Funnyman David Walliams presented him with the coveted gong in front of a star-studded audience at the British Takeaway Awards ceremony in London last week. The judging panel commended Brian for his punctuality, reliability and cheerful attitude.

“I believe I am probably the oldest person delivering Indian takeaways in the British Isles. People have asked how I do it but according to the medics I am 100% fit. I think the secret is not drinking or smoking,” the octogenarian said.

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“I believe I am probably the oldest person delivering Indian takeaways in the British Isles. People have asked how I do it but according to the medics I am 100% fit. I think the secret is not drinking or smoking,” the octogenarian said. (SWNS)

“I was a taxi driver for 40 years so I know my way around and when I was offered the work here I thought it might be a bit of fun. I enjoy going out and meeting people. It’s nice to have won but I don’t like having my name up in lights really, I’ve always been a little bit more quiet, I just do the things that need to be done,” he added.

“I’m not so much into spicy food, but the customers like it. My favorite is the grilled chicken tikka and rice.”

Dad-of-four Brian was a senior aircraftman with the RAF in the 1950s, serving as an air traffic controller during the volatile Suez Crisis. Later he worked as a TV engineer and then spent 40 years as a taxi driver – which taught him the streets of Halifax so well he doesn’t need a GPS.

His only fear is dogs after being bitten by an Alsatian and a cocker spaniel while delivering Yellow Pages.

During last winter’s big Beast from the East freeze Brian, who drives his own car, came across a woman stranded in the snow with her young daughter. Their car had broken down and their phone was dead so Brian gave them a lift home.

It was only as he was dropping them off he discovered it was the same address he was delivering to. The husband was initially angry that his food had taken so long to arrive – until he realized Brian had brought his wife and child home safely.

“Brian is an absolutely wonderful employee and we’re very proud to have him working here. (SWNS)

Brian works on average three or four shifts a week which can range from two to ten jobs per shift.

Kiplings boss Mohammed Rafiq, 52, said: “Brian is an absolutely wonderful employee and we’re very proud to have him working here.

Brian works on average three or four shifts a week which can range from two to ten jobs per shift. (SWNS)

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“The customers absolutely love him. He’s a bit of a celebrity around here. Brian is absolutely irreplaceable. It really is our honor. We get him in at the prime times, the shifts vary. Sometimes he delivers two meals and sometimes he delivers 10,” the manager said.

“Brian leaves an impression with the customer, he is not just an ordinary delivery driver. When Brian delivers you remember your delivery.”

This story was originally published by SWNS.

Steve Doocy: Can God be in gravy? Let me tell you what happened with my mom

I don’t know about you but we don't eat much gravy these days unless it’s a holiday, like Thanksgiving. For me, the gold standard when it came to gravy was my mom’s. So delicious and unique, it always tasted like home.

For the longest time I tried but couldn't replicate her recipe, she never measured which I think was probably the way she learned from her mom, who in the 1950’s and 60’s, was a short-order cook at Frank and Em’s out on the highway north of Algona, Iowa.

Whenever I wanted to make mashed potatoes and gravy for that taste of home, I would call my mom in Kansas and she would walk me through how she did it. I probably called her 50 times and by about the 51st time I’d figured out how to make a good gravy, so maybe I was using it as an excuse to call and show her that even though I was 40 years old, a son will always need his mother.

My mom died on Christmas morning 1997. It was sudden and completely unexpected.

Two weeks after the funeral, I was back in New Jersey. It was a Sunday morning and I was the lector for the 10 a.m. mass. They asked me if I wanted a substitute, given what had happened but I said no, I wanted to do it. In between readings, probably still in shock, standing in church, it was impossible not to think about my mother and wonder about Heaven and all of those things we hope really do exist. Listening to the choir on the opposite side of the church, I started looking in their direction and noticed in front of the altar an elaborate array of beautiful flowers and gifts and foods still on display from Christmas.

It took a moment to register but the closest bouquet to me was a huge spray of daisies. I’d never seen daisies in my church but there they were, just like the daisies my Mom held as she walked down the aisle of another church the day she married my dad.

Was that a sign? Maybe daisies are used a lot in churches and I just never noticed, I said to myself as I eyed the rest of the display. But then I stopped and stared at something you never see in the front of any church.

Gravy.

Amid the other holiday foods, a single bright red packet of McCormick gravy mix.

I got goosebumps.

My mom’s favorite flowers and a gravy packet.

Maybe the daisies were a sign, and the gravy was another, in case I didn’t believe the first one.

It’s hard to explain the feeling that washed over me. After a really lousy Christmas, maybe it was a sign from God or Mom that there was a Heaven and she was up there keeping an eye on me. Or maybe it was simply a coincidence, although as Albert Einstein said, “Coincidence is God’s way of remaining anonymous.”

When my wife Kathy and I wrote "The Happy Cookbook" we did not include a gravy recipe. It’s not that Mom took the recipe with her; I know exactly how to make it…

Remove the meat from the pan and leave a few drippings. Over low heat stir in a slurry of 2 tablespoons of cornstarch mixed with 1 or 2 cups of broth. Whisk while it cooks. Salt, pepper, serve.

I have not made that in 20 years but please try it, it’s delicious.

Somebody said once that a legacy is not leaving something for people, it’s leaving something in people.

My mom’s gravy? As I tap on my chest, above my heart, just know, it’s right in there.

Steve Doocy currently serves as co-host of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) FOX & Friends (weekdays 6-9AM/ET). Based in New York, he joined the network in 1996. His latest book is, “The Happy Cookbook.” Click here for more information on Steve Doocy.

Steve Doocy: Can God be in gravy? Let me tell you what happened with my mom

I don’t know about you but we don't eat much gravy these days unless it’s a holiday, like Thanksgiving. For me, the gold standard when it came to gravy was my mom’s. So delicious and unique, it always tasted like home.

For the longest time I tried but couldn't replicate her recipe, she never measured which I think was probably the way she learned from her mom, who in the 1950’s and 60’s, was a short-order cook at Frank and Em’s out on the highway north of Algona, Iowa.

Whenever I wanted to make mashed potatoes and gravy for that taste of home, I would call my mom in Kansas and she would walk me through how she did it. I probably called her 50 times and by about the 51st time I’d figured out how to make a good gravy, so maybe I was using it as an excuse to call and show her that even though I was 40 years old, a son will always need his mother.

My mom died on Christmas morning 1997. It was sudden and completely unexpected.

Two weeks after the funeral, I was back in New Jersey. It was a Sunday morning and I was the lector for the 10 a.m. mass. They asked me if I wanted a substitute, given what had happened but I said no, I wanted to do it. In between readings, probably still in shock, standing in church, it was impossible not to think about my mother and wonder about Heaven and all of those things we hope really do exist. Listening to the choir on the opposite side of the church, I started looking in their direction and noticed in front of the altar an elaborate array of beautiful flowers and gifts and foods still on display from Christmas.

It took a moment to register but the closest bouquet to me was a huge spray of daisies. I’d never seen daisies in my church but there they were, just like the daisies my Mom held as she walked down the aisle of another church the day she married my dad.

Was that a sign? Maybe daisies are used a lot in churches and I just never noticed, I said to myself as I eyed the rest of the display. But then I stopped and stared at something you never see in the front of any church.

Gravy.

Amid the other holiday foods, a single bright red packet of McCormick gravy mix.

I got goosebumps.

My mom’s favorite flowers and a gravy packet.

Maybe the daisies were a sign, and the gravy was another, in case I didn’t believe the first one.

It’s hard to explain the feeling that washed over me. After a really lousy Christmas, maybe it was a sign from God or Mom that there was a Heaven and she was up there keeping an eye on me. Or maybe it was simply a coincidence, although as Albert Einstein said, “Coincidence is God’s way of remaining anonymous.”

When my wife Kathy and I wrote "The Happy Cookbook" we did not include a gravy recipe. It’s not that Mom took the recipe with her; I know exactly how to make it…

Remove the meat from the pan and leave a few drippings. Over low heat stir in a slurry of 2 tablespoons of cornstarch mixed with 1 or 2 cups of broth. Whisk while it cooks. Salt, pepper, serve.

I have not made that in 20 years but please try it, it’s delicious.

Somebody said once that a legacy is not leaving something for people, it’s leaving something in people.

My mom’s gravy? As I tap on my chest, above my heart, just know, it’s right in there.

Steve Doocy currently serves as co-host of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) FOX & Friends (weekdays 6-9AM/ET). Based in New York, he joined the network in 1996. His latest book is, “The Happy Cookbook.” Click here for more information on Steve Doocy.

Steve Doocy: Can God be in gravy? Let me tell you what happened with my mom

I don’t know about you but we don't eat much gravy these days unless it’s a holiday, like Thanksgiving. For me, the gold standard when it came to gravy was my mom’s. So delicious and unique, it always tasted like home.

For the longest time I tried but couldn't replicate her recipe, she never measured which I think was probably the way she learned from her mom, who in the 1950’s and 60’s, was a short-order cook at Frank and Em’s out on the highway north of Algona, Iowa.

Whenever I wanted to make mashed potatoes and gravy for that taste of home, I would call my mom in Kansas and she would walk me through how she did it. I probably called her 50 times and by about the 51st time I’d figured out how to make a good gravy, so maybe I was using it as an excuse to call and show her that even though I was 40 years old, a son will always need his mother.

My mom died on Christmas morning 1997. It was sudden and completely unexpected.

Two weeks after the funeral, I was back in New Jersey. It was a Sunday morning and I was the lector for the 10 a.m. mass. They asked me if I wanted a substitute, given what had happened but I said no, I wanted to do it. In between readings, probably still in shock, standing in church, it was impossible not to think about my mother and wonder about Heaven and all of those things we hope really do exist. Listening to the choir on the opposite side of the church, I started looking in their direction and noticed in front of the altar an elaborate array of beautiful flowers and gifts and foods still on display from Christmas.

It took a moment to register but the closest bouquet to me was a huge spray of daisies. I’d never seen daisies in my church but there they were, just like the daisies my Mom held as she walked down the aisle of another church the day she married my dad.

Was that a sign? Maybe daisies are used a lot in churches and I just never noticed, I said to myself as I eyed the rest of the display. But then I stopped and stared at something you never see in the front of any church.

Gravy.

Amid the other holiday foods, a single bright red packet of McCormick gravy mix.

I got goosebumps.

My mom’s favorite flowers and a gravy packet.

Maybe the daisies were a sign, and the gravy was another, in case I didn’t believe the first one.

It’s hard to explain the feeling that washed over me. After a really lousy Christmas, maybe it was a sign from God or Mom that there was a Heaven and she was up there keeping an eye on me. Or maybe it was simply a coincidence, although as Albert Einstein said, “Coincidence is God’s way of remaining anonymous.”

When my wife Kathy and I wrote "The Happy Cookbook" we did not include a gravy recipe. It’s not that Mom took the recipe with her; I know exactly how to make it…

Remove the meat from the pan and leave a few drippings. Over low heat stir in a slurry of 2 tablespoons of cornstarch mixed with 1 or 2 cups of broth. Whisk while it cooks. Salt, pepper, serve.

I have not made that in 20 years but please try it, it’s delicious.

Somebody said once that a legacy is not leaving something for people, it’s leaving something in people.

My mom’s gravy? As I tap on my chest, above my heart, just know, it’s right in there.

Steve Doocy currently serves as co-host of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) FOX & Friends (weekdays 6-9AM/ET). Based in New York, he joined the network in 1996. His latest book is, “The Happy Cookbook.” Click here for more information on Steve Doocy.