Get them while they’re not hot: GM is killing these six models next year

Following Ford and Fiat Chrysler’s lead, General Motors is reducing the number of sedan and hatchback models it offers in the United States in favor of a lineup made up largely of trucks and SUVs. THE CHEVY VOLT KILLED BY CHEAP GAS?: Video Several manufacturing plants in North America will be idled, and thousands of … Continue reading “Get them while they’re not hot: GM is killing these six models next year”

Following Ford and Fiat Chrysler’s lead, General Motors is reducing the number of sedan and hatchback models it offers in the United States in favor of a lineup made up largely of trucks and SUVs.

THE CHEVY VOLT KILLED BY CHEAP GAS?:

Video

Several manufacturing plants in North America will be idled, and thousands of workers laid off by the end of 2019 as the company gears up to fill the void with new electric and autonomous vehicles.

Six models are set to be eliminated, leaving a handful of four-door cars in GMs showrooms. At least for now.

Here are the ones riding off into the sunset next year:

(Chevrolet)

Chevrolet Volt: The second generation of the company’s once-heralded plug-in hybrid hasn’t sold much better than the original, but did outsell the surviving all-electric Bolt EV through September of this year.

(Chevrolet)

Chevrolet Cruze: It may be GM’s most popular car globally, but U.S. sales of the compact sedan and hatchback have tanked in recent years as shoppers have moved from small cars into small SUVs.

(Chevrolet)

Chevrolet Impala: The classic American full-size sedan hasn’t fared any better than the Cruze, and is moving aside in favor of the upcoming rebooted Chevrolet Blazer.

(Cadillac)

Cadillac CT6: Cadillac’s flagship sedan has been sunk by the popular Escalade SUV and a three-row crossover expected to debut soon.

(Cadillac)

Cadillac XTS: The oldest car in Cadillac’s lineup still does well with the livery car set and makes a fine hearse, but that’s not the image GM is betting its future on.

(Buick)

Buick LaCrosse: It actually outsells the Regal, but is built in the same factory as the Impala, Volt and CT6, and can’t keep the lights on by itself.

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Gary Gastelu is FoxNews.com’s Automotive Editor.

Feds investigating 2.7 million GM pickups and SUVs for faulty brake issue

The U.S. government is investigating more than 100 complaints of poor brake performance on 2.7 million General Motors big pickups and SUVs.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says a brake vacuum pump can deteriorate, causing increased braking effort and longer stopping distances.

The agency has 111 consumer complaints including nine crashes and two injuries.

The investigation covers 2014 through 2016 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups. Also involved are Chevrolet Suburban and Tahoe, the GMC Yukon and Cadillac Escalade SUVs.

The agency will determine how often the problem happens and whether a recall is necessary.

GM is monitoring complaints and warranty claims about the brakes and is working with NHTSA to evaluate them, spokesman Tom Wilkinson said Friday.

Any owner who has a problem with brake performance should have them examined by a GM dealer or independent repair shop, Wilkinson said.

They should keep receipts because they could be reimbursed for repairs if there is a recall, he added.

Trump must save GM’s Lordstown, Ohio plant, or he might be the next to lose his job

Last July, President Donald Trump came to my hometown in Ohio. The Mahoning Valley, as it is known, is ground zero for what I refer to as the “Trump Democrat.”

The Youngstown-Warren area has been reliably blue for generations, fueled by the working-class union households who equated the Democratic Party with jobs and good wages. Over the years, the steel industry that once employed thousands of workers has disappeared. Tired of empty promises, these same Democrats were drawn to Donald Trump as someone who could finally help turn around our long-suffering community.

When President Trump visited Youngstown, he told to the crowd of 8,000 people that he noticed the skeletal remains of once occupied factories. “We’re going to fill up those factories or rip them down and build new ones,” he said. “After years and years of sending our jobs and wealth to other countries, we are finally standing up for our workers and for our companies…We never again will sacrifice Ohio jobs and those in other states to enrich other countries.”

The crowd cheered, bolstered with hope that President Trump would protect their jobs.

While steel jobs may have dwindled, manufacturing – anchored by the General Motors’ Lordstown assembly plant – has remained the cornerstone of the local economy. The facility has had its ups and downs since it first opened in 1966.

In its early days, GM Lordstown employed over 13,000 Ohioans. Today, roughly 1,600 people work there. A number of different models have been manufactured at the plant, including the Chevy Caviler, Pontiac Sunfire and the current Chevy Cruze.

My local community and its leaders have always banded together to show GM that Lordstown was up to the task of keeping a product or making a new one. They managed to hang on for 52 years, until this week, when the plant’s closing was announced.

The jobs Trump vowed to protect have vanished. I’m not suggesting that Trump caused the closure. Sales of the Chevy Cruze have been flagging for a while due to the growing SUV market share. 1,500 employees were laid off earlier this year. And Lordstown is not alone. GM will eliminate roughly 14,000 jobs between five plants in the U.S. and Canada next year.

But here is what is infuriating to me. General Motors continues to make the Chevy Cruze hatchback model in Mexico and has expanded its operations there to include new production of the Chevy Blazer. President Trump said he would not allow Ohio jobs to be sacrificed to enrich other countries, but that is exactly what is happening.

But here is what is infuriating to me. General Motors continues to make the Chevy Cruze hatchback model in Mexico and has expanded its operations there to include new production of the Chevy Blazer. President Trump said he would not allow Ohio jobs to be sacrificed to enrich other countries, but that is exactly what is happening.

GM employs 5,600 people in Mexico to make the Chevy Cruze hatchback – basically the same car GM is taking away from Lordstown. The average wage of a Mexican worker in a GM plant is $3 per hour. Meanwhile, 1,600 Ohioans will lose jobs that pay roughly $24 per hour to an assembly line worker.

GM jobs built my community’s middle class by paying good wages and providing a strong benefits package. Lordstown families could afford to get their kids braces and send them to college. They could go out to dinner or the movies. They put money back into the local economy.

Losing Lordstown is more than just about losing jobs. It’s about losing our dignity and sense of self that has been defined by GM’s presence in Trumbull County for over five decades.

Donald Trump won Trumbull County, which is home to the GM Lordstown plant. He was the first Republican to win this county in 88 years. I am from Trumbull County and represented it in the Ohio Senate for 10 years. I know from speaking to my neighbors and constituents that many of them voted for Trump because they expected him to help our economy.

Well, here is President Trump’s chance to help us.

Our local economy will collapse if Lordstown closes. The president needs to work with GM to move production of the Cruze from Mexico to Lordstown. In speaking with plant officials when I was in office, I learned it would take minimal investment to adapt the line at Lordstown to be able to make the hatchback Cruze that is currently being made in Mexico.

President Trump’s slogan on the campaign trail now is “Promises Kept.” I believe he wants to keep the promises he made to the people of the Mahoning Valley, and I think only the Trump White House can move this big of a mountain.

If Trump fails to help, Ohio may not blame him for GM closing its doors, but they will blame him for not saving the plant. If that happens, Trump may be the next to lose his job in 2020.

In the Mahoning Valley, we never give up when the chips are down. President Trump should not give up on getting GM to invest in Ohio.

Capri S. Cafaro is a former Democratic Ohio state senator. She is currently a political commentator and an executive in residence at American University. Follow her on Twitter @thehonorablecsc.

Feds investigating 2.7 million GM pickups and SUVs for faulty brake issue

The U.S. government is investigating more than 100 complaints of poor brake performance on 2.7 million General Motors big pickups and SUVs.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says a brake vacuum pump can deteriorate, causing increased braking effort and longer stopping distances.

The agency has 111 consumer complaints including nine crashes and two injuries.

The investigation covers 2014 through 2016 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups. Also involved are Chevrolet Suburban and Tahoe, the GMC Yukon and Cadillac Escalade SUVs.

The agency will determine how often the problem happens and whether a recall is necessary.

GM is monitoring complaints and warranty claims about the brakes and is working with NHTSA to evaluate them, spokesman Tom Wilkinson said Friday.

Any owner who has a problem with brake performance should have them examined by a GM dealer or independent repair shop, Wilkinson said.

They should keep receipts because they could be reimbursed for repairs if there is a recall, he added.

Get them while they’re not hot: GM is killing these six models next year

Following Ford and Fiat Chrysler’s lead, General Motors is reducing the number of sedan and hatchback models it offers in the United States in favor of a lineup made up largely of trucks and SUVs.

THE CHEVY VOLT KILLED BY CHEAP GAS?:

Video

Several manufacturing plants in North America will be idled, and thousands of workers laid off by the end of 2019 as the company gears up to fill the void with new electric and autonomous vehicles.

Six models are set to be eliminated, leaving a handful of four-door cars in GMs showrooms. At least for now.

Here are the ones riding off into the sunset next year:

(Chevrolet)

Chevrolet Volt: The second generation of the company’s once-heralded plug-in hybrid hasn’t sold much better than the original, but did outsell the surviving all-electric Bolt EV through September of this year.

(Chevrolet)

Chevrolet Cruze: It may be GM’s most popular car globally, but U.S. sales of the compact sedan and hatchback have tanked in recent years as shoppers have moved from small cars into small SUVs.

(Chevrolet)

Chevrolet Impala: The classic American full-size sedan hasn’t fared any better than the Cruze, and is moving aside in favor of the upcoming rebooted Chevrolet Blazer.

(Cadillac)

Cadillac CT6: Cadillac’s flagship sedan has been sunk by the popular Escalade SUV and a three-row crossover expected to debut soon.

(Cadillac)

Cadillac XTS: The oldest car in Cadillac’s lineup still does well with the livery car set and makes a fine hearse, but that’s not the image GM is betting its future on.

(Buick)

Buick LaCrosse: It actually outsells the Regal, but is built in the same factory as the Impala, Volt and CT6, and can’t keep the lights on by itself.

FOLLOW FOX NEWS AUTOS ON FACEBOOK FOR SO MUCH MORE

Gary Gastelu is FoxNews.com’s Automotive Editor.

Trump must save GM’s Lordstown, Ohio plant, or he might be the next to lose his job

Last July, President Donald Trump came to my hometown in Ohio. The Mahoning Valley, as it is known, is ground zero for what I refer to as the “Trump Democrat.”

The Youngstown-Warren area has been reliably blue for generations, fueled by the working-class union households who equated the Democratic Party with jobs and good wages. Over the years, the steel industry that once employed thousands of workers has disappeared. Tired of empty promises, these same Democrats were drawn to Donald Trump as someone who could finally help turn around our long-suffering community.

When President Trump visited Youngstown, he told to the crowd of 8,000 people that he noticed the skeletal remains of once occupied factories. “We’re going to fill up those factories or rip them down and build new ones,” he said. “After years and years of sending our jobs and wealth to other countries, we are finally standing up for our workers and for our companies…We never again will sacrifice Ohio jobs and those in other states to enrich other countries.”

The crowd cheered, bolstered with hope that President Trump would protect their jobs.

While steel jobs may have dwindled, manufacturing – anchored by the General Motors’ Lordstown assembly plant – has remained the cornerstone of the local economy. The facility has had its ups and downs since it first opened in 1966.

In its early days, GM Lordstown employed over 13,000 Ohioans. Today, roughly 1,600 people work there. A number of different models have been manufactured at the plant, including the Chevy Caviler, Pontiac Sunfire and the current Chevy Cruze.

My local community and its leaders have always banded together to show GM that Lordstown was up to the task of keeping a product or making a new one. They managed to hang on for 52 years, until this week, when the plant’s closing was announced.

The jobs Trump vowed to protect have vanished. I’m not suggesting that Trump caused the closure. Sales of the Chevy Cruze have been flagging for a while due to the growing SUV market share. 1,500 employees were laid off earlier this year. And Lordstown is not alone. GM will eliminate roughly 14,000 jobs between five plants in the U.S. and Canada next year.

But here is what is infuriating to me. General Motors continues to make the Chevy Cruze hatchback model in Mexico and has expanded its operations there to include new production of the Chevy Blazer. President Trump said he would not allow Ohio jobs to be sacrificed to enrich other countries, but that is exactly what is happening.

But here is what is infuriating to me. General Motors continues to make the Chevy Cruze hatchback model in Mexico and has expanded its operations there to include new production of the Chevy Blazer. President Trump said he would not allow Ohio jobs to be sacrificed to enrich other countries, but that is exactly what is happening.

GM employs 5,600 people in Mexico to make the Chevy Cruze hatchback – basically the same car GM is taking away from Lordstown. The average wage of a Mexican worker in a GM plant is $3 per hour. Meanwhile, 1,600 Ohioans will lose jobs that pay roughly $24 per hour to an assembly line worker.

GM jobs built my community’s middle class by paying good wages and providing a strong benefits package. Lordstown families could afford to get their kids braces and send them to college. They could go out to dinner or the movies. They put money back into the local economy.

Losing Lordstown is more than just about losing jobs. It’s about losing our dignity and sense of self that has been defined by GM’s presence in Trumbull County for over five decades.

Donald Trump won Trumbull County, which is home to the GM Lordstown plant. He was the first Republican to win this county in 88 years. I am from Trumbull County and represented it in the Ohio Senate for 10 years. I know from speaking to my neighbors and constituents that many of them voted for Trump because they expected him to help our economy.

Well, here is President Trump’s chance to help us.

Our local economy will collapse if Lordstown closes. The president needs to work with GM to move production of the Cruze from Mexico to Lordstown. In speaking with plant officials when I was in office, I learned it would take minimal investment to adapt the line at Lordstown to be able to make the hatchback Cruze that is currently being made in Mexico.

President Trump’s slogan on the campaign trail now is “Promises Kept.” I believe he wants to keep the promises he made to the people of the Mahoning Valley, and I think only the Trump White House can move this big of a mountain.

If Trump fails to help, Ohio may not blame him for GM closing its doors, but they will blame him for not saving the plant. If that happens, Trump may be the next to lose his job in 2020.

In the Mahoning Valley, we never give up when the chips are down. President Trump should not give up on getting GM to invest in Ohio.

Capri S. Cafaro is a former Democratic Ohio state senator. She is currently a political commentator and an executive in residence at American University. Follow her on Twitter @thehonorablecsc.

Feds investigating 2.7 million GM pickups and SUVs for faulty brake issue

The U.S. government is investigating more than 100 complaints of poor brake performance on 2.7 million General Motors big pickups and SUVs.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says a brake vacuum pump can deteriorate, causing increased braking effort and longer stopping distances.

The agency has 111 consumer complaints including nine crashes and two injuries.

The investigation covers 2014 through 2016 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups. Also involved are Chevrolet Suburban and Tahoe, the GMC Yukon and Cadillac Escalade SUVs.

The agency will determine how often the problem happens and whether a recall is necessary.

GM is monitoring complaints and warranty claims about the brakes and is working with NHTSA to evaluate them, spokesman Tom Wilkinson said Friday.

Any owner who has a problem with brake performance should have them examined by a GM dealer or independent repair shop, Wilkinson said.

They should keep receipts because they could be reimbursed for repairs if there is a recall, he added.

Stealthy hydrogen-powered Chevrolet Silverado military truck breaks cover

The Chevrolet Silverado could be heading to the front lines, but not the same one you can buy. At least not yet.

GM Defense, the new General Motors division focused on military machines, has posted a video to its website that reveals a hydrogen-fueled electric Silverado ZH2 pickup is in the works. Automotive News reports that the video was first presented at the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual meeting in October.

The camouflaged truck appears to be based on the upcoming all-new 2020 Silverado HD, which the automaker has teased with a single image released earlier this year. The two share the same distinctive lighting and grill styling, and the video refers to the Silverado ZH2 as a heavy duty design.

The Silverado ZH2 is essentially a super-size version of the Colorado ZH2 that’s been undergoing tests with the U.S. Army's Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center since last year, and rides on a set of Multimatic spool valve shocks similar to the ones found on the Colorado ZR2 high performance off-roader.

Video

Instead of a battery pack, the Silverado is equipped with three tanks of hydrogen for a Hydrotec-branded fuel cell that generates electricity and provides stealthy, but powerful performance over a 400-mile range. Along with its quiet operation, the powertrain has a lower heat signature than an internal combustion engine would create and produces drinkable water as its only emission.

The pitch is that military units can convert the expensive JP8 fuel they bring into the field into hydrogen on site, then use it more efficiently in fuel cell vehicles like the ZH2s, which can be refueled in a fraction of the time it would take to charge a battery pack with similar range. GM is also developing a hydrogen-powered fully-autonomous cargo vehicle called the SURUS with military applications in mind.

General Motors hasn’t announced plans for any hydrogen-powered consumer vehicles, but it is collaborating with Honda on fuel cell development and promises to have 20 electric models in its lineup by 2023.

Gary Gastelu is FoxNews.com’s Automotive Editor.