Indiana high school fullback dominating opponents, but doesn’t have a scholarship offer

An Indiana high school football player who has torn up the gridiron this season still has no place to play next year. New Palestine High School junior Charlie Spegal racked up 3,356 rushing yards and scored 70 touchdowns during the 2018 season — but he's reportedly yet to receive a scholarship offer from any college, … Continue reading “Indiana high school fullback dominating opponents, but doesn’t have a scholarship offer”

An Indiana high school football player who has torn up the gridiron this season still has no place to play next year.

New Palestine High School junior Charlie Spegal racked up 3,356 rushing yards and scored 70 touchdowns during the 2018 season — but he's reportedly yet to receive a scholarship offer from any college, let alone a top-tier football program.

And there's more than in-game stats that make Spegal a standout.

The 5-10, 225 lb. fullback for New Palestine, located 15 miles east of Indianapolis, can also run a 4.6-second 40-yard dash, squat 575 pounds and bench press 420 pounds, according to a Bleacher Report profile Monday.

Spegal’s skillset, however, may not be exactly what the average college coach is looking for. Instead of dazzling speed, Spegal has shown the ability to find the smallest hole in an offensive line, power through it and shake off three or four would-be tacklers along the way. He told Bleacher Report he models his game after a former Heisman Trophy nominee.

“I really idolized Adrian Peterson,” Spegal said. “I like how hard it is to bring him down and how easily he breaks a lot of tackles. But yes, I have always enjoyed contact.”

Spegal doesn’t have the prototypical “dream school,” saying instead he just wants to go somewhere in the Midwest. He sent letters to colleges showcasing his ballooned statistics, his 3.36 GPA and his desire to earn a business degree.

“If given the opportunity I know I can be a tremendous asset to the football program. Please check out my HUDL Highlights and personal information below,” Spegal’s letters say.

Ball State, Cincinnati and Eastern Michigan have been the only schools to invite him to even watch a game this season, according to Bleacher Report.

Northern Illinois coaches paid him a visit and Army and Navy have also shown interest in Spegal.

"“If given the opportunity I know I can be a tremendous asset to the football program."

— Charlie Spegal

“I think a lot of it is people trying to figure out what he is,” Spegal’s coach Kyle Ralph said. “Is he someone who's going to fit well in their system? You're going to get what you get from him. You're going to get a back with great vision, great bursts and great power.”

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

California teacher who sang national anthem while forcibly cutting student’s hair is arrested

Land of the free and home of the shaved?

A California teacher was arrested on child endangerment charges after she seemingly was caught on video cutting a student's hair while shouting incorrect lyrics to "The Star-Spangled Banner."

Margaret Gieszinger, 52, was taken into custody after police responded to reports of a teacher endangering students with a "pair of scissors" at University Preparatory High School in Visalia, the Visalia Times-Delta reported Wednesday.

Video posted online showed the woman telling a student to "take a seat" in a chair placed in front of the classroom.

Gieszinger loudly shouted wrong lyrics of the national anthem while allegedly chopping off a couple chunks of the student's hair and tossing it behind her.

INDIANA SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR GOES VIRAL AFTER SINGING STUNNING NATIONAL ANTHEM

After the student got up from the seat, Gieszinger could be heard shouting, "Next! I'm not done. Next! Next!" She then appeared to select students from the classroom to come up.

One student is heard on video shouting, "Don't you touch me!" as Gieszinger appeared to walk throughout the classroom with the scissors.

WW2 veteran, turning 100 soon, belts out national anthem before NHL game

The NHL’s Tampa Bay Lightning celebrated Military Appreciation Night on Thursday, and one veteran, in particular, received thunderous applause from the crowd.

Gieszinger seemingly then grabbed a female student's hair and pulled it up while wielding the scissors in the air. The student got away, while the teacher continued to walk about while angrily singing the national anthem.

Students appeared to yelp and frantically leave the classroom. The student filming the video ran from the room, as classmates asked if they caught the incident on video.

According to the high school's website, Gieszinger teaches science at University Preparatory. Principal Eric Thiessen reportedly told students Wednesday afternoon that "all students are safe" following what unfolded in the classroom.

One of Gieszinger's students told the Visalia Times-Delta that what the teacher did "is inexcusable," and called her actions out of character.

"She is a loving and kind lady. She is usually all smiles and laughs," the student said. "This is not the Miss G. we know and love."

OHIO WOMAN ALLEGEDLY POURED HOT GREASE ON ANOTHER WOMAN DURING ARGUMENT

Gieszinger's teaching credentials were suspended for 14 days in both 2007 and 2016, the news outlet noted, citing the Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The reason for the suspension was not clear.

Online records from the Tulare County Sheriff's Office show that Gueszinger was booked Wednesday on suspicion of felony child endangerment. Her bond was set at $100,000.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Video gaming becomes official after-school league at US high schools

PHOENIX – Charles Slack is a student at Mesa Community College who plays video games several hours a day. He considers it his passion. And he’s not alone.

As video games keep gaining popularity, schools are taking notice – and trying to capitalize on the booming trend.

Schools across the country are beginning to recognize gaming as an “electronic sport” – and making it an official, after-school activity, complete with statewide tournaments.

Arizona became just the latest in a growing number of states welcoming video games in schools. Beginning in February, the Arizona Interscholastic Association, or AIA, will partner with Legacy eSports to start a regular season, tournament, and championship for schools to compete in.

“We find this as a unique opportunity to get those students that might normally go home after school and play a game on their computer but now get them into school to where they can meet up with their peers,” said Brian Bolitho, AIA director of business development. “And school pride—compete for a state tournament and a championship there and engage these students that normally might not be involved in their high school community.”

Charles Slack is a student at Mesa Community College who plays video games several hours a day. He considers it his passion. And he’s not alone.<br data-cke-eol="1"> (Fox News)

Bolitho said at some Arizona schools, there’s already been more students at the eSports informational meetings than football, basketball, and baseball informational meetings combined.

Legacy eSports will be launching similar leagues in California, New Mexico and Louisiana next year. The High School eSports League, another group that organizes eSports tournaments and clubs, has partnered with high schools in almost every state, including Hawaii, Florida, Texas and New York.

But the move has triggered a backlash among parents, mental health professionals and athletic coaches who call the trend both troubling – and dangerous.

“I think sitting in front of a TV is a sedative – your metabolism is going to change. It’s going to cause us to become fatter, it’s going to cause us to become more unhealthy than we are as a community and a society versus if we can get out and get everyone playing together, it’s better for our brains,” said Brieann Salisbury, a mother of two from Washington state, where some schools have video game leagues.

She said she will not allow her kids to join gaming clubs.

“It’s better for our kids to be outside and enjoy it,” she said.

Brian Bolitho, AIA director of business development, said at some Arizona schools, there’s already been more students at the eSports informational meetings than at informational meetings of football, basketball, and baseball combined. (Fox News)

Michael Fraser, a child psychologist who specializes in video game addiction, said he’s seen firsthand the drawbacks of gaming. He said an alarming number of kids are becoming video game addicts, which affects their grades and could make them physically aggressive.

“I think it starts out as recreational. Certainly they have fun,” Fraser said. “A lot of kids, instead of doing their homework, are going to play the video games after school. The homework then either doesn’t get done or the homework gets pushed back to a very late hour where the child is either too tired to do it or they’re up late, they lose sleep. The next day they’re showing poor focus, poor attention. They fall asleep in class.”

Regardless of the backlash, gaming keeps growing at an astronomical pace. The 2018 professional League of Legends video game final was watched live by more than 200 million people. That’s more than the Super Bowl, NBA Finals, and Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony combined, according to figures compiled by ESC, Sports Media Watch, and Variety.

And supporters don’t only point to its growth as the reason to train students. Professional gaming has become a lucrative enterprise – with players making millions a year sitting on a couch for video game competitions.

Bolitho said more than 70 universities are offering scholarships for students to play video games at their college and he said studies have shown that kids playing eSports are more likely to pursue STEM-related careers.

There are more than 70 universities offering scholarships for students to play video games at their colleges. (Fox News)

“There's obviously opportunity for these students, after the fact, to then get involved in those tech-related fields—streaming, programming and development,” Bolitho said. “So, that's the avenue that we're looking at here.”

Some say gaming could also help with socialization, particularly with kids who have trouble making friends.

“I think electronic sports…they provide you ways to socialize and become closer to other people,” said Luis Perez Cortes, an Arizona State University doctoral student who plans on conducting eSports research and how it affects learning. “In schools, that might translate to any number of other positive things, such as greater feelings of belongingness. This might also increase retention or, in other words, how students want to stay in school maybe even because they can now play video games in school.”

The amount of time Americans spend playing video games (and board games) has risen by 50 percent since 2003, according to the Washington Post.

Pure eSports in Gilbert, Ariz., opened up recently this year and houses gaming counsels for teams like Saint Benedictine University – Mesa eSports team to use for practice. (Fox News)

That has athletic instructors concerned, particularly since some schools are encouraging gaming.

“If they do this, they also understand that they need to go out and play—that they need to do physical activities in addition to this,” said William Kuehl, Grand Canyon University exercise science professor and lead for physical education.

Studies on the effects of gaming are uneven. One study by RMIT University in Australia study found competition in video games leads to increased aggression. Another study by the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine found that “competitive active video games improved children’s psychological responses (affect and rate of perceived exertion) compared with single play, providing a solution that may contribute toward improved adherence to physical activity."

AIA and Legacy eSports said they steer away from violent games and prohibit games rated “M” for “M” for Mature.

“They’re a trend, I think it's important for us to recognize that and channel it and not try to fight it,” Kuehl said. “I don't think that that's going to solve anything, anyway. Children are going to do what they're going to do.”

Charlie Lapastora is a multimedia reporter based in Phoenix, Ariz.

Lawyer for parents of teen who drowned claims video surveillance shows teacher on cell phone: report

A lawyer for the parents of a teenager who drowned during a high school swim class earlier this year said in a lawsuit that surveillance video appears to show the teacher looking at his cell phone while the teen drowned.

Benjamin Curry, 15, drowned on May 8 at the San Ramon Valley High School swim class, an autopsy report said. Aaron Becker, the physical education teacher, was apparently having the students tread water, The East Bay Times reported in October.

"I’ve learned from reviewing the video and having it enhanced that it appears that the instructor was looking at his cell phone while standing on a diving board when he should’ve been supervising the children," Andy Schwartz, the family's attorney, said, according to the Bay Area News Group. "If he was on his phone he probably was distracted. It’s one of those unanswered questions that the Currys would like to have answered."

Karen and Thomas Curry sued the San Ramon Valley Unified School District and Becker, alleging negligence and willful misconduct over the drowning, the paper reported.

The 57 students in the P.E. class were told to tread water for three minutes, but Becker added another 30-seconds because one of the students touched a lane rope, San Francisco's KGO-TV reported, citing police reports. Some claim that suggests Becker was paying attention.

But the surveillance footage suggests it was closer to four minutes, Schwartz said.

"You got to remember– this wasn't the swim team or a water polo team. This was a PE class," Schwartz told KGO-TV.

The lawsuit alleged that Becker had minimal water safety training and his lifeguard certification lapsed about two months before Curry's drowning, San Francisco's KRON-TV reported.

The district "sincerely apologizes to the Curry family and all community members," addressed rumors and announced policy changes in a statement released by Superintendent Rick Schmitt in November, the Bay Area News Group reported then.

The district also told KRON-TV that if the pool is being used at school, lifeguards will now be present.

Attorney William Gagen, who said he has been advising Becker about the case, said the teacher will not make any comments due to the pending lawsuit, according to reports.

“This is not because he doesn’t care. He is traumatized by what happened to Ben Curry,” Gagen said. “I have advised him not to make statements. He and his family feel terrible about Ben’s death and I convey this to you on his behalf.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Amy Lieu is a news editor and reporter for Fox News.

Kansas high school football coach gets ice bath after winning title, absolutely hates it

A Kansas high school football coach appeared to hate the ice bath he received upon winning the team’s first-ever state title Saturday.

A Wichita Eagle photojournalist caught St. Thomas Aquinas head coach Randy Dreiling appears to yell at two of his players after they gave him the Powerade shower.

The Overland Park parochial school defeated Wichita Northwest, 49-28, to win the Kansas Class 5A high school title.

Dreiling was subsequently asked by the Wichita Eagle if he still wasn’t a fan of the ice bath.

“No, not a fan of the ice bath. No, nobody ever gives me ice baths. That was a bad deal,” he said.

Aquinas had previously lost the 5A state title in 2014 and 2017, according to the Kansas City Star.

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

Kansas high school football coach gets ice bath after winning title, absolutely hates it

A Kansas high school football coach appeared to hate the ice bath he received upon winning the team’s first-ever state title Saturday.

A Wichita Eagle photojournalist caught St. Thomas Aquinas head coach Randy Dreiling appears to yell at two of his players after they gave him the Powerade shower.

The Overland Park parochial school defeated Wichita Northwest, 49-28, to win the Kansas Class 5A high school title.

Dreiling was subsequently asked by the Wichita Eagle if he still wasn’t a fan of the ice bath.

“No, not a fan of the ice bath. No, nobody ever gives me ice baths. That was a bad deal,” he said.

Aquinas had previously lost the 5A state title in 2014 and 2017, according to the Kansas City Star.

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

Students photographed appearing to give Nazi salute protected by free-speech, Wisconsin school district says

Officials with a Wisconsin school district have admitted free-speech rights would make it difficult to discipline the high school students who appeared to be delivering Nazi salutes in a photo.

The controversial image that went viral earlier this month was taken last spring outside the Sauk County Courthouse in Baraboo, Wisconsin. The image was posted on a Twitter account earlier this month, making the rounds across the internet.

PHOTOGRAPHER SAYS HE TOLD STUDENTS TO ‘WAVE GOODBYE’ IN CONTROVERSIAL PHOTO: REPORT

The image, which included about 60 boys, drew widespread condemnation because of the appearance that some of the students are giving a Nazi salute.

Peter Gust, the photographer who took the picture, said the image was “taken out of context” and was as “innocent as boys and girls going to prom.” He said he told the boys to “wave goodbye” before heading off to their prom.

A group of Wisconsin high school boys stand on the steps outside the Sauk County Courthouse in Baraboo, Wisconsin. (Peter Gust via AP)

The photo received condemnation from social media users and even caught the attention of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum which blasted the students and district over the image.

“If @barabooSD wishes to know more about what can be the extreme result of normalization of hatred…please see some online lessons dedicated to the history of Auschwitz,” the museum tweeted.

BARABOO SCHOOL DISTRICT WEIGHING LEGAL ACTION AFTER STUDENTS PURPORTEDLY PHOTOGRAPHED DOING NAZI SALUTE

The school district said it would investigate the incident and what led to the students making the gesture. The State Journal reported that Baraboo Superintendent Lori Mueller said in a letter to parents Wednesday that officials cannot know the “intentions in the hearts” of those involved.

She also said the district isn’t in a position to punish the students because they are protected by the First Amendment. Her letter said part of the district’s investigation was completed.

Fox News’ Amy Lieu and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com. You can follow her at @Kathleen_Joyce8 on Twitter.