5 holiday gift ideas for the health nut in your life

It’s time to get your holiday shopping finished. If you still have a few more relatives or friends on your list who love to hit the trail or work up a sweat in the gym, here are 5 healthier gift ideas your athlete may love. 1) GARMIN Vívoactive® 3 The design of this watch is much … Continue reading “5 holiday gift ideas for the health nut in your life”

It’s time to get your holiday shopping finished. If you still have a few more relatives or friends on your list who love to hit the trail or work up a sweat in the gym, here are 5 healthier gift ideas your athlete may love.

1) GARMIN Vívoactive® 3

The design of this watch is much sleeker than your average fitness tracker.

With so many different fitness watches on the market, it could be difficult to pick out the right one for that special someone on your list, but the GARMIN Vívoactive 3 combines all you’d want in a fitness tracker and a smartwatch.

It’s loaded with all the health and fitness essentials like the ability to map your run while also measuring steps and stairs, and it can monitor sleep and continuous heart rate, but in this new version, it also tracks your maximal oxygen uptake (VO2), fitness age, and real-time stress levels.

Turning this health tracker into a smartwatch allows users to leave their phones behind to keep up on any incoming calls and texts (although you can’t answer them or text back). Vívoactive 3 also has a music component with storage for up to 500 songs. Connect it to Bluetooth-enabled headphones and you can workout without having your phone by your side. The smart device even comes with a Garmin pay feature that lets you store credit card information so you can leave your wallet behind too.

The design of this watch is much sleeker than your average fitness tracker. The touchscreen watch face is subtle and stylish, much like its competitors, Apple Watch and Fitbit Versa.

Another feature worth mentioning is that compared to other smartwatches, Garmin says Vivoactive 3 can keep going for up to a week on a single charge and 13 hours with GPS turned on.

Price: $299.99, available at Garmin.com

2) TRX Home2 System 

The TRX Home2 System comes with one suspension trainer, a year subscription to the TRX app and a door and suspension anchor to easily set up your workout anywhere you want.

The fitness fanatic on your list will thank you for their new at-home TRX system, which will make them feel like they are at a fancy studio class right their own living room.

TRX, which stands for "total body resistance exercise," uses gravity and your own bodyweight to make exercises more challenging. A study done with 16 healthy men and women found users who performed three 60-minute TRX sessions per week saw a significant decrease in waist circumference, body-fat percentage, resting systolic blood pressure and resting diastolic blood pressure.

The TRX Home2 System comes with one suspension trainer, a year subscription to the TRX app and a door and suspension anchor to easily set up your workout anywhere you want.

The company says the setup is easy and can be done in just under a minute. For example, you can mount the anchor right over any door but you will need a workout space that is flat, non-slip and gives you approximately eight feet long and six feet wide of space, according to the company.

The TRX app acts as a mini trainer in your pocket. It includes over 80 workouts with some yoga and high intensity-interval training (HITT) type methods. You can select from an array of different lengths of guided workouts like a 10-minute core strength or a 45-minute endurance challenge.

Price: $199.95, available at TRXtraining.com

3) Gaiam’s Ultimate Balance Ball Chair

Move over standing desks, it's time to sit comfortably and still reap the benefits. Gaiam’s latest version of a balance ball chair is designed to relieve stress on the spine, strengthen the core and improve posture. In fact, a study done by the Department of Communication at Stanford University found people who sat on the Gaiam Balance Ball Chair instead of a regular office chair had significantly better posture, engaged their core muscles more often and reported higher levels of energy.

All of the health benefits come from simply sitting on the ball- and trying to keep your balance. When you sit on top of the round surface, your body is constantly making adjustments with small micro-movements to stay stable, thus remaining active the entire time you’re sitting.

If you're using the chair for a home office, you can even take the ball off the base of the chair so you can use it for exercises and stretches.

The chair also comes equipped with a 5-wheel base to allow smooth movements and a lock function if you want stability.

Price: $99.98, available at Gaiam.com

4) Hammacher’s Germ and Mold Destroying Air Purifier

Hammacher’s Air Purifier is a filter-free device that uses natural convection to draw in contaminated air to destroy the germs and other impurities with 400 degrees of heat.

Help your loved ones stay healthy this year with an air purifier that reportedly eliminates up to 99.9 percent of airborne bacteria, viruses, pet dander, dust mite allergens, pollen, and mold.

Mold can grow inside the home at any time of the year, but when you’re inside more often during the winter months, humidity and moisture are likely to increase, leading to the growth of mold. Even if you don’t have a mold allergy, exposure to molds can cause irritation to the eyes, lungs, nose, skin, and throat, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Hammacher’s Air Purifier is a filter-free device that uses natural convection to draw in contaminated air to destroy the germs and other impurities with 400 degrees of heat. It then sends the new clean air back into the environment without any significant change in room temperature or humidity.

The clean air device also comes with a built-in nightlight with ten different adjustable colors, making it a nice addition to any room or nursery.

Price: $299.95, available at Hammacher.com

5) Packed with Purpose’s ‘Good for You Goodies’ Box 

For your health concise friend or family member, send them the "Good for You Goodies" box.

Give a healthy gift that gives back with a Packed with Purpose gift box.

These packages are created with products made from non-profits and social enterprises that have an ethical, fair trade and eco-friendly impact on local communities.

For your health concise friend or family member, send them the "Good for You Goodies" box. They'll receive an array of healthy treats like a tea infused energy snack made by Tea Squares, a company that employs young adults from underserved communities throughout Chicago. Trail mix from Together We Bake, a bakery in Virginia that also offers workforce training and personal development to women who have histories of trauma, abuse, or addiction. And a Lola Granola Bar, made from a company that supports anti-hunger and food education programs.

Price: $50, available at Packedwithpurpose.gifts

Lindsay Carlton is a Senior video producer and writer for Fox Digital Originals. Follow her on Twitter @LCCARLTON

Don’t eat glitter, FDA warns: How to tell when the sparkly substance is actually edible

It may look tempting, but that sparkly glitter on top of a freshly baked cupcake, cookie or other tasty treats may not be safe to eat.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) re-issued the warning Friday, reminding consumers that “some decorative glitters and dusts promoted for use on foods may, in fact, contain materials that should not be eaten.”

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Many of the decorative glitters and dust — which are sometimes labeled as luster dust, disco dust, twinkle dust, sparkle dust, highlighter, shimmer powder, pearl dust, or petal dust, according to the FDA — can be found both online and at bakery or craft stores.

While some of these are safe to consume, others are not, especially if “the label simply says ‘non-toxic’ or ‘for decorative purposes only’ and does not include an ingredients list,” the FDA said.

To tell if a glitter or dust is safe to eat, look for labeling that clearly states the product is edible or see if it contains certain ingredients such as acacia (gum arabic), sugar, cornstarch and certain color additives, among other safe-to-eat components.

While the agency didn’t detail the health risks of eating non-edible glitter, Zhaoping Li, a professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Clinical Nutrition at UCL, previously told Eater it’s best to avoid the substance, especially those who have pre-existing gastrointestinal issues.

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“Non-toxic glitter may not kill you, but don’t eat it,” Li said. “At least not regularly or large quantities.”

The warning follows a similar one posted by the FDA in November and comes as the “glitter trend” has apparently taken over aspects of the food industry, MarketWatch reported in May. In fact, in 2014, some people were reportedly swallowing “glitter pills” in the hopes the substance would make their poop sparkle.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Should you run outside in winter?

When the temperature dips below freezing and the ground becomes a sheet of ice, the bitter cold wind drives many athletes and weekend warriors indoors.

But there are plenty of others who see the falling snow as a cue to put on their running shoes and head outside for some exercise. In fact, winter running has become a popular activity recently for people who compete in year round races, or for those looking to work off the added holiday pounds.

In fact, many companies that specialize in outdoor activities now sell shoes specifically designed for inclement conditions, with features like tapered bottoms to better grip icy ground and thick water proof shells designed to keep feet warm and dry.

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But what would possess someone to run outside in the cold when they could stay indoors and run on a treadmill?

“Ugh, not the treadmill,” Joe McAntosh, a 56-year-old Michigan native who’d rather bundle up than run inside, said. “I feel like a robot when I use that thing.”

McAntosh trains outside all winter, no matter what how low the temperature dips, and claims to love it.

"The cooler air is good for my muscles,” he said. “It keeps them from swelling up like they do in the summer.”

Melissa Polivka, who has already completed marathons in 30 states in her quest to hit 50, said she doesn’t take the season off simply because the weather is cold.

“The treadmill is so boring and hard on my legs,” Polivka, who sometimes runs with toe warmers in her shoes, told Fox News. “If it’s really bad, I put duct tape around the tops of my shoes to keep the snow out."

But, just because someone prefers to run in the cold than hit the treadmill, from a medical standpoint does that mean they really should?

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"For the most part, if you're healthy enough to run other times of the year and not suffering from cardiac issues or injuries, it's usually fine," Dr. Aneesh Garg, of Chicago Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, told Fox News. "Although cold weather can be an increased trigger for asthma sufferers."

Some of the preparations Garg recommends include "making sure to wear proper running clothes that keep your muscles warm.  Use skin protection, such as Vaseline, to prevent wind burn.  And wear sunscreen" because even though its winter, your skin can still burn.

Hydration is also key.

"Often athletes don't feel thirsty when they run in the winter because of the cold but you can still get dehydrated," Garg said.

Garg, who is a team physician for USA Hockey, said, however, that there is a time when people should not be running outdoors.

"If the ground is icy, if there's black ice, you can slip and fall, causing secondary injuries," he said.

Running coach Jenny Hadfield knows about cold weather exertion.  Hadfield, an experienced runner and owner of CoachJenny.com, leads groups for marathons in Alaska and Antarctica, where the temperature can drop to a bone-chilling -40 degrees.

But being out in such frigid conditions without getting numb hands and chapped skin takes planning, Hadfield said. She suggests spending extra time warming up.

“Take at least 5 minutes to walk briskly before you start to run” she said. “It may take 10-15 minutes of running before you are completely warmed up and in your running tempo.”

She suggests shortening your stride and keeping your feet lower to the ground to reduce the risk of slipping, falling or straining muscles. She also recommends to avoid overdoing it with cold gear.

“Your body temperature increases as you run, so you don’t need many layers in most winter conditions,” Hadfield said.

Figuring out just the right wardrobe for Chicago winters was a challenge at first for Aparna Thakur, who grew up in New Delhi, India, where temperatures easily climb to over 100 degrees at times.

Now Thakur can be found hitting the frozen pavement at the crack of dawn.

“I find it magical to see all the ice formations on the lake,” she said.

For others, hitting the pavement while others have headed indoors can be relaxing.

“It’s so peaceful, it’s my form of meditation” adds McAntosh.

Ruth Ravve joined the Fox News Channel (FNC) in 1996 and currently serves as a Chicago-based producer.

Chemicals found in makeup, soap, other personal care products may speed up puberty in girls, study says

Makeup, toothpaste, and soap: What do these everyday personal care items have in common? According to a recent study, certain chemicals found in them could contribute to girls hitting puberty earlier.

The study, which was led by researchers at the University of California Berkeley and published in the journal Human Reproduction earlier this week, analyzed pregnant women who lived in “farm-working, primarily Latino communities of Central California’s Salinas Valley” between 1999 and 2000, according to a news release from UC Berkeley.

Researchers took urine samples from mothers twice during their pregnancy. They then took urine samples from the 338 children — 159 boys and 179 girls — when they reached 9 years of age, then tracked their growth and “developmental milestones” from that time until they reached age 13.

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The urine was tested for the presence of different chemicals, such as diethyl phthalate and triclosan — the first of which “is often used as a stabilizer in fragrances and cosmetics,” according to the news release. The second is found in some kinds of toothpaste.

By the end, “researchers in the School of Public Health found that daughters of mothers who had higher levels of diethyl phthalate and triclosan in their bodies during pregnancy experienced puberty at younger ages," they concluded. The same was not true for boys.

More specifically, each time the concentration of the two chemicals — diethyl phthalate and triclosan — doubled in the mother’s urine, “the timing of developmental milestones in girls shifted approximately one month earlier,” they said.

“Girls who had higher concentrations of parabens in their urine at age 9 also experienced puberty at younger ages,” the researchers continued. Parabens are used in cosmetics as a preservative.

The findings come after a number of studies over the past two decades have “shown that girls and possibly boys have been experiencing puberty at progressively younger ages,” the researchers said, noting reaching puberty at a young age “has been linked with increased risk of mental illness, breast and ovarian cancer in girls and testicular cancer in boys.”

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But this study is one of the few that has specifically analyzed how these chemicals could affect “the growth of human children,” researchers said.

“We wanted to know what effect exposure to these chemicals has during certain critical windows of development, which include before birth and during puberty,” Kim Harley, an associate adjunct professor in the School of Public Health who worked on the study, said in a statement.

“We know that some of the things we put on our bodies are getting into our bodies, either because they pass through the skin or we breathe them in or we inadvertently ingest them,” she added. “We need to know how these chemicals are affecting our health.”

While it’s not absolutely certain the chemicals were causing the girls to reach puberty at a younger age, “people should be aware that there are chemicals in personal care products that may be disrupting the hormones in our bodies,” Harley said, adding more research is still needed.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Construction worker suicide rates are highest in the US, CDC study says

Males working in construction have the highest suicide rates in the country, according to a recent analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Comparing the suicides of more than 22,000 people across 17 states in 2012 and 2015, researchers found males working in construction and extraction took their lives the most often, a rate of roughly 44 per 100,000 “civilian noninstitutionalized working persons” for construction workers and 53 per 100,000 for extraction workers.

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Men working in the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media came in second — an increase of 47 percent during the years studied, according to the CDC. Installation, maintenance and repair rounded out the top three for males in 2015.

Comparatively, in 2015, women working in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media had the highest suicide rates for females, while women in protective services came in second. The third were women who worked in health care support, according to the study.

“Among both males and females, the lowest suicide rate in 2015 was observed in Education, Training, and Library occupations,” the CDC reported.

The research comes adjacent to the rising suicide rates in the U.S. overall. The health agency announced in June the rates have been rising in “nearly every state,” with 25 states reporting a more than 30 percent increase during the study period.

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“Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said in an online statement. “Knowing who is at greater risk for suicide can help save lives through focused prevention efforts.”

The study Thursday is a correction to a similar 2016 study, which mistakenly included the misclassification of some workers as farmers instead of managers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Mold in dorms: What should colleges do to protect students

It’s every college’s worst nightmare: mold.

Dorm students have been reporting mold problems at the University of Maryland since early September, reports the Baltimore Sun. By the end of the month, the university's facilities staff had found the problem so severe they began moving students into nearby hotels.

In an email sent on September 19, staff had encouraged students to report mold incidents. A few days later, the university sent out another email telling students the problem would need more thorough treatment, reports Baltimore Sun.

The newspaper details how Maryland is taking care of this issue. They’ve hired mold specialists and are working to install dehumidifiers as well as inspect and clean rooms where service for mold was requested.

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However, students are now raising health concerns they claim the mold might have caused. For example, a recent report by Fox News highlights the death of Maryland student Olivia Paregol.

According to the report, Olivia suffered from Crohn’s disease and a weak immune system. Then, the freshman contracted the same strain of Adenovirus that recently killed 11 children in New Jersey.

While Olivia’s father admits officials haven’t proven the mold as a cause, he points out that it didn’t help either.

According to the report, the university is assuring students they are taking measures to treat the mold problem.

What to Do about Mold at College

While Maryland’s situation has raised some hype, it’s not the first college to deal with mold problems. Still, the situation does bring up the question: what should colleges do about mold and its prevention?

There’s no doubt mold can harm students’ health. According to the CDC, mold can affect people in various ways. Some will simply get stuffy noses or itchy, watery eyes.

Others with respiratory problems like asthma might have worse reactions. In some cases, repeated mold exposure can even lead to asthma.

Colleges and students should treat mold as a serious problem.

Susan Brinchman, who founded the Center for School Mold Help, told Health magazine that students should treat the building like it’s on fire. They need to get out as soon as they can.

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The CDC outlines several measures anyone can take in preventing mold. First, any known mold problems should be treated immediately, preventing the problem from spreading.

Colleges can also:

?       Keep air conditioners in good working condition.

?       Use dehumidifiers in dorms.

?       Make sure the rooms are ventilating properly (bathroom vents, etc.).

?       Address water problems in the dorm, such as soaked carpets.

In addition to these measures, colleges should consider performing routine mold inspections. This way staff can take care of problems before they become as big a situation as Maryland’s.

Colleges can also educate students about mold and its ideal conditions. Students will then understand their responsibility to report mold situations as well as abnormal amounts of moisture in the room.

In a college dorm situation, the only real way to prevent a mold problem is by working together.

Dr. Manny Alvarez serves as Fox News Channel’s senior managing health editor. He also serves as chairman of the department of obstetrics/gynecology and reproductive science at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey. For more information on Dr. Manny’s work, visit AskDrManny.com.

Mold in dorms: What should colleges do to protect students

It’s every college’s worst nightmare: mold.

Dorm students have been reporting mold problems at the University of Maryland since early September, reports the Baltimore Sun. By the end of the month, the university's facilities staff had found the problem so severe they began moving students into nearby hotels.

In an email sent on September 19, staff had encouraged students to report mold incidents. A few days later, the university sent out another email telling students the problem would need more thorough treatment, reports Baltimore Sun.

The newspaper details how Maryland is taking care of this issue. They’ve hired mold specialists and are working to install dehumidifiers as well as inspect and clean rooms where service for mold was requested.

SOUTH DAKOTA REPORTS FIRST FLU DEATH OF SEASON

However, students are now raising health concerns they claim the mold might have caused. For example, a recent report by Fox News highlights the death of Maryland student Olivia Paregol.

According to the report, Olivia suffered from Crohn’s disease and a weak immune system. Then, the freshman contracted the same strain of Adenovirus that recently killed 11 children in New Jersey.

While Olivia’s father admits officials haven’t proven the mold as a cause, he points out that it didn’t help either.

According to the report, the university is assuring students they are taking measures to treat the mold problem.

What to Do about Mold at College

While Maryland’s situation has raised some hype, it’s not the first college to deal with mold problems. Still, the situation does bring up the question: what should colleges do about mold and its prevention?

There’s no doubt mold can harm students’ health. According to the CDC, mold can affect people in various ways. Some will simply get stuffy noses or itchy, watery eyes.

Others with respiratory problems like asthma might have worse reactions. In some cases, repeated mold exposure can even lead to asthma.

Colleges and students should treat mold as a serious problem.

Susan Brinchman, who founded the Center for School Mold Help, told Health magazine that students should treat the building like it’s on fire. They need to get out as soon as they can.

CASES OF MYSTERIOUS POLIO-LIKE ILLNESS HIGHEST IN US SINCE 2016

The CDC outlines several measures anyone can take in preventing mold. First, any known mold problems should be treated immediately, preventing the problem from spreading.

Colleges can also:

?       Keep air conditioners in good working condition.

?       Use dehumidifiers in dorms.

?       Make sure the rooms are ventilating properly (bathroom vents, etc.).

?       Address water problems in the dorm, such as soaked carpets.

In addition to these measures, colleges should consider performing routine mold inspections. This way staff can take care of problems before they become as big a situation as Maryland’s.

Colleges can also educate students about mold and its ideal conditions. Students will then understand their responsibility to report mold situations as well as abnormal amounts of moisture in the room.

In a college dorm situation, the only real way to prevent a mold problem is by working together.

Dr. Manny Alvarez serves as Fox News Channel’s senior managing health editor. He also serves as chairman of the department of obstetrics/gynecology and reproductive science at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey. For more information on Dr. Manny’s work, visit AskDrManny.com.

Construction worker suicide rates are highest in the US, CDC study says

Males working in construction have the highest suicide rates in the country, according to a recent analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Comparing the suicides of more than 22,000 people across 17 states in 2012 and 2015, researchers found males working in construction and extraction took their lives the most often, a rate of roughly 44 per 100,000 “civilian noninstitutionalized working persons” for construction workers and 53 per 100,000 for extraction workers.

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Men working in the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media came in second — an increase of 47 percent during the years studied, according to the CDC. Installation, maintenance and repair rounded out the top three for males in 2015.

Comparatively, in 2015, women working in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media had the highest suicide rates for females, while women in protective services came in second. The third were women who worked in health care support, according to the study.

“Among both males and females, the lowest suicide rate in 2015 was observed in Education, Training, and Library occupations,” the CDC reported.

The research comes adjacent to the rising suicide rates in the U.S. overall. The health agency announced in June the rates have been rising in “nearly every state,” with 25 states reporting a more than 30 percent increase during the study period.

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“Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said in an online statement. “Knowing who is at greater risk for suicide can help save lives through focused prevention efforts.”

The study Thursday is a correction to a similar 2016 study, which mistakenly included the misclassification of some workers as farmers instead of managers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Construction worker suicide rates are highest in the US, CDC study says

Males working in construction have the highest suicide rates in the country, according to a recent analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Comparing the suicides of more than 22,000 people across 17 states in 2012 and 2015, researchers found males working in construction and extraction took their lives the most often, a rate of roughly 44 per 100,000 “civilian noninstitutionalized working persons” for construction workers and 53 per 100,000 for extraction workers.

ADENOVIRUS OUTBREAK IN NEW JERSEY KILLS 11, OFFICIALS ORDER CENTER TO SEPARATE PATIENTS

Men working in the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media came in second — an increase of 47 percent during the years studied, according to the CDC. Installation, maintenance and repair rounded out the top three for males in 2015.

Comparatively, in 2015, women working in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media had the highest suicide rates for females, while women in protective services came in second. The third were women who worked in health care support, according to the study.

“Among both males and females, the lowest suicide rate in 2015 was observed in Education, Training, and Library occupations,” the CDC reported.

The research comes adjacent to the rising suicide rates in the U.S. overall. The health agency announced in June the rates have been rising in “nearly every state,” with 25 states reporting a more than 30 percent increase during the study period.

SUCKING ON YOUR BABY’S PACIFIER TO CLEAN IT MAY BE GOOD FOR THEIR HEALTH, STUDY SAYS

“Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said in an online statement. “Knowing who is at greater risk for suicide can help save lives through focused prevention efforts.”

The study Thursday is a correction to a similar 2016 study, which mistakenly included the misclassification of some workers as farmers instead of managers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Sleep and exercise compete for people’s time

On weekday mornings, two healthy activities – exercise and sleep – compete with each other for time, researchers say.

As exercise increases, sleep decreases among those who wake up early to work out before heading to their jobs, the study authors report in the journal Sleep Health. At the same time, getting some exercise versus none during the day also helped people to sleep better.

“Sleep research has focused on the ways that sleep deprivation affects overall health, but at some point we began wondering what people were doing with the time they weren’t sleeping,” said senior study author Dr. Mathias Basner of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

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The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society both recommend seven or more hours of sleep per night, yet more than a third of adults in the U.S. say they sleep less than that.

“We all have 24 hours in a day, so for the people who only sleep five or six hours, are they doing a healthy behavior or sitting in front of the TV eating chips?” Basner said in a phone interview. “We’ve been trying to identify activities that could be traded for more sleep.”

Basner and colleagues analyzed American Time Use Survey data for nearly 48,000 working men and women interviewed on a weekday between 2003 and 2016. As part of the survey, participants logged how they spent their time in the previous 24 hours.

Researchers found that people spent most of their time working and commuting. About 17 percent said they had exercised in the last 24 hours. Overall, long work hours were associated with both short sleep and low exercise rates. At the same time, those who exercised slept an average of 15 minutes less than those who didn’t. In fact, sleep time dropped as exercise time increased.

The strongest association between exercise and sleep was seen among people who exercised between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. or between 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. Exercise for up to an hour either in the morning or the evening was not associated with significantly shorter sleep.

“The problem is, we can’t tell people to work less, but we can look at habits before bed, which is usually TV watching, or in the morning, which is commuting and grooming,” Basner said. “This study suggests it’s possible to both exercise and get enough sleep.”

Basner and colleagues were surprised to find that in contrast to previous advice about not exercising before bed, those who got physical activity later at night seemed to still get plenty of sleep. Instead of harming sleep, exercising during the day, even if close to bedtime, might help people to sleep more deeply or fall asleep sooner, he said.

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“This probably depends on personality, too, and whether someone has an early or late circadian preference,” he added. “An owl who is likely to go to bed at 1 a.m. might exercise well at night, and the lark who wakes up at 5 a.m. anyway might exercise before work.”

Family income and education levels influenced sleep time as well. Generally, those who earn more and have higher education tend to get less sleep, but they’re also more likely to exercise. Although this study was based in the U.S., Basner speculates the same would apply in other developed countries.

“There is the impression that we are pressed for time now more than ever. This is probably due, in part, to exposure to more time-wasting things like social media, nevertheless, clearly for many people there is a perceived choice between healthy behaviors,” said Shawn Youngstedt, a researcher at Arizona State University in Tempe who wasn’t involved in the study.

A limitation of using American Time Use Survey data to study exercise and sleep, he said, is that “sleep” includes lying in bed and resting, which could skew the results.

At the same time, he said by email, “This advances an excellent idea to try to promote exercise at times in which it does not curtail sleep. Offering exercise opportunities at work would probably facilitate healthy and more productive workers.”