West must take tougher stand against Russia, Ukraine president tells FOX News

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko called on Western democratic nations to take a tougher stand against Russia amid escalating tensions between the two regional rivals. During an appearance Friday on "Fox News @ Night," Poroshenko told host Shannon Bream he would like to see a major NATO presence in the Black Sea, where Russian forces in November shot … Continue reading “West must take tougher stand against Russia, Ukraine president tells FOX News”

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko called on Western democratic nations to take a tougher stand against Russia amid escalating tensions between the two regional rivals.

During an appearance Friday on "Fox News @ Night," Poroshenko told host Shannon Bream he would like to see a major NATO presence in the Black Sea, where Russian forces in November shot at and seized three Ukrainian naval vessels and captured 24 sailors.

“This is the act of aggression," Poroshenko told Bream from the Ukrainian capital of Kiev. "Mr. [Russian President Vladamir] Putin, this is a war and this is not a joke and not an incident and not a crisis because your regular forces under the Russian flag attacked in the international war the Ukrainian military vessels."

RUSSIAN MILITARY FIRES ON UKRAINIAN VESSELS IN BLACK SEA, UKRAINE SAYS

He called the world's reaction to the maritime incident "quite strong," but called for sanctions against Moscow and a NATO presence in the Black Sea to deter Russian aggression.

A Ukrainian serviceman stands on board a coast guard ship in the Sea of Azov port of Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. The Ukrainian military has been on increased readiness as part of martial law introduced in the country in the wake of the Nov. 25, 2018 incident in the Sea of Azov, in which the Russian coast guard fired upon and seized three Ukrainian navy vessels along with their crews. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka) (Associated Press)

"Nobody knows tomorrow where Putin [will] make a decision to protect Russian interests," he said, adding that Ukraine needs military and technical upgrades — "including the supply the lethal weapons to help us to protect our country" from a possible ground operation.

Poroshenko said he plans to send navy ships in response to Russia’s blocking of the Kerch Strait, which links the Black Sea with the Sea of Azov, a key waterway.

The Russian lower house of parliament issued a statement, calling the move a "reckless and cynical attempt to change the situation in his [Poroshenko] favor and a desire to cling to power at any cost at the threat of a full-scale war."

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Since the seizure of its ships and its sailors, Ukraine has amped up missile tests, sent troops to its border and declared martial law.

On Thursday, American forces flew an Open Skies Treaty flight over Ukraine in response to the attack. The maneuver was the first of its kind since Russia’s 2014 annexation of the Crimea from Ukraine, and came a day after the Pentagon announced it would sail a warship into the Black Sea.

RUSSIA-UKRAINE TENSIONS ESCALATE AFTER NAVAL VESSEL FRACAS; HALEY CALLS IT A ‘PROVOCATION’

"Russia is blocking the freedom of navigation in the Ukrainian territorial water," Poroshenko said. "And now the United States because we should have a reaction with that situation. Russian vessels should be blocked for entering the European or American ports and we are ready to open the coordination of what type of action should be undertaken immediately."

US, China agree to 90-day truce to hash out trade differences

The U.S. and China have agreed to a 90-day truce in a bid to work out their trade differences. The news came Saturday following a dinner meeting between President Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping at the Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires.

As part of the detente, Trump agreed to delay plans to raise tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods that would have taken effect Jan. 1. China agreed to buy a “substantial amount” of agricultural, energy and industrial products from the U.S. to reduce the trade deficit.

"It's an incredible deal," Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One, on his way back to Washington. "What I'll be doing is holding back on tariffs. China will be opening up, China will be getting rid of tariffs. China will be buying massive amounts of products from us."

"It’s an incredible deal. What I’ll be doing is holding back on tariffs. China will be opening up, China will be getting rid of tariffs. China will be buying massive amounts of products from us."

— President Donald Trump

The temporary agreement will give both nations time to iron out their differences. If not, the $200 billion in planned tariffs will go into effect.

Trump has already imposed tariffs on $250 billion on Chinese products. In response, China slapped taxes on $110 billion in American goods.

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The meeting came during Trump’s weekend trip to Argentina where he canceled a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin amid tensions between Russia and Ukraine. He also canceled a Saturday news conference following the death of former President George H.W. Bush.

"It's great the two sides took advantage of this opportunity to call a truce," said Andy Rothman, investment strategist at Matthews Asia. "The two sides appear to have had a major change of heart to move away from confrontation toward engagement. This changes the tone and direction of the bilateral conversation."

China also conceded to label fentanyl, the synthetic opioid cited in thousands of drug deaths, as a controlled substance and agreed to reconsider a takeover by U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm that it had previously blocked.

China nixed the proposed purchase of Dutch semiconductor manufacturer NXP by the chipmaker over antitrust concerns.

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White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said China's decision to label the drug as a controlled substance means that "people selling fentanyl to the United States will be subject to China's maximum penalty under the law."

The U.S. has pressured China to take a tougher stance against the drug, which is 50 times more powerful than heroin. Most of the U.S. supply of the drug is made in China.

Washington has also accused Beijing of selling trade secrets and forcing American companies to hand over technology in exchange for access to Chinese markets.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Facebook CEO Zuckerberg won’t meet with European committee, will send VP instead

Instead of appearing before top European policymakers to answer questions about Facebook’s possible role in the spread of disinformation, CEO Mark Zuckerberg will send a representative.

Richard Allan, Facebook’s vice president for policy solutions, will testify Tuesday before a committee of lawmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Ireland, Latvia and Singapore, the Washington Post reported.

But Zuckerberg's decision to send a stand-in apparently hasn't gone over well in Europe.

“The Committee still believes that Mark Zuckerberg is the appropriate person to answer important questions about data privacy, safety, security and sharing,” committee members said jointly in a statement Friday.

FACEBOOK'S MARK ZUCKERBERG HAS NO PLAN TO STEP DOWN

European lawmakers have raised concerns over the way social media companies handle hate speech and terrorism on their platforms. In May, Zuckerberg was questioned about Facebook's mishaps by leaders in Brussels.

Video

In other parts of the world, the company has big business deals in the works. Facebook is preparing to host its first-ever data center in Asia in Singapore, which will cost the social media giant $1 billion.

Zuckerberg’s decision to not testify in front of the British-led committee comes as Facebook faces intense scrutiny over the way he and Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg have guided the company in recent years. Critics have called for him to step aside as chairman amid a series of scandals that have put the social media giant's credibility into question.

But the CEO recently indicated he has no intentions of leaving — and said he hopes to continue working with Sandberg.

On Wednesday, outgoing Facebook executive Elliot Schrage took responsibility for hiring a Republican opposition research firm to push back on its critics, Vanity Fair reported.

George Soros, the Democratic billionaire philanthropist, is a frequent target of conservative critics. (georgesoros.com)

The firm, known as Definers, was asked to investigate George Soros, the Democratic billionaire philanthropist who is a frequent target of conservatives. Soros has called for greater oversight of the tech company.

In response to Schrage's statement, Sandberg wrote that some Definers work "had crossed my desk," after previously saying she was unfamiliar with the company.

Facebook also been taken to task over how it handles users personal data and how it was allegedly used to incite violence against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar and Russian efforts to use the platform to sow discord ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

American killed by bow and arrow-wielding tribe while trying to visit remote Indian island

An American tourist trying to visit a lush, remote island in India has been killed by a tribe completely cut off from the outside world and known to attack outsiders with bows and arrows, police revealed Wednesday.

Indian officials have identified the victim as John Allen Chau, 27. They added that he was illegally ferried by fishermen to North Sentinel Island last week, part of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, a group of islands in the Bay of Bengal between India and Burma.

“Adventure awaits. So do leeches,” read the final post on his Instagram account, dated Nov. 2. On his Facebook profile, Chau described himself as a “soccer coach, traveller, and writer.” He often posted images of his worldwide exploits online, such as hikes in Washington state and prior trips to India.

Two police officials identified the victim to Reuters as John Allen Chau, 27. (Facebook)

Visitation to North Sentinel Island is heavily restricted by the Indian government and contact with the Sentinelese tribe who lives there is illegal to protect their indigenous way of life and prevent the spread of diseases.

The tribe is amongst the first people to successfully migrate out of Africa and scientists believe they arrived in the region some 60,000 years ago, the BBC reports.

A police source told Reuters that Chau is a preacher who had visited the area in the past and had a strong desire to meet the tribe. The source also claimed Chau expressed interest in preaching to them.

AMERICAN TOURIST, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO GRADUATE KILLED WHILE VACATIONING IN MEXICO, FAMILY WANTS ANSWERS

Dependera Pathak, director-general of police on India's Andaman and Nicobar Islands, told the Associated Press that Chau arrived in the region on Oct. 16 and stayed in a hotel while he prepared to visit the prohibited island.

He said Chau organized his visit to the island through a friend who hired seven fishermen for $325 to take him there on a boat, which also towed his kayak.

Chau went ashore in his kayak on Nov. 15 and sent the boat with the fishermen out to sea to avoid detection, Pathak said. He interacted with some of the tribespeople, giving them gifts he had prepared such as a football and fish. But the tribespeople became angry and shot an arrow at him which apparently hit a book he was carrying, Pathak said.

The American's kayak became damaged, so he swam to the fishermen's boat, which was waiting at a prearranged location. There he spent the night and wrote out his experiences on pages of paper which he gave to the fishermen, Pathak said.

In one of the notes handed over, according to the New York Times, Chau wrote about Jesus bestowing him with the strength to visit some of the most forbidden places on Earth.

Chau then set off for the island again the following day. Sources who spoke to AFP though said once he set foot on shore, he was “attacked by arrows but he continued walking.

“The fishermen saw the tribals tying a rope around his neck and dragging his body,” one source added.

Following Chau's death, the fishermen left for Port Blair, the capital of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, where they informed Chau's friend, who notified his family, Pathak said.

He said the family got in touch with Indian police and U.S. consular officials.

"It was a case of misdirected adventure," he added.

The body, according to Reuters, has not yet been recovered as of Wednesday, and those who took him to the island are said to have been arrested.

"The investigation in this matter is on," senior police officer Deepak Yadav said, announcing that the seven fishermen have been taken into custody.

It is not the first time someone has been attacked while trying to visit the island.

In 2006, two fishermen whose boat strayed into the waters around the island were killed – and their bodies have never been found, Reuters reports.

An Indian Coast Guard helicopter that had tried to land in the area to find the pair was forced to turn around after coming under fire by arrows, the news agency says.

Two years earlier, an Indian Navy helicopter that flew to the island to check up on its residents in the wake of the devastating Indian Ocean tsunami also was met with a greeting of arrows.

"So we knew that they were safe," one of the pilots told the BBC.

Chau has not been the first person to be attacked in the area of North Sentinel Island.

The U.S. Consulate in Chennai, in the capital of Tamil Nadu state, said it was aware of reports of Chau’s death but declined to comment further.

The International Christian Concern, a U.S.-based nonprofit that aims to fight persecution against Christians, called the death concerning.

“We here at International Christian Concern are extremely concerned by the reports of an American missionary being murdered in India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands," its regional manager, William Stark, said in a statement. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to both John’s family and friends."

Shiv Viswanathan, a social scientist at the Jindal Global Law School, said the island is a protected area and not open to tourists.

“The exact population of the tribe is not known, but it is declining,” Viswanathan said. “The government has to protect them.”

Survival International, an organization that works for the rights of tribal people, said the most recent killing should prompt Indian authorities to continue to protect the lands of the Sentinelese and other Andaman tribes.

"The British colonial occupation of the Andaman Islands decimated the tribes living there, wiping out thousands of tribespeople, and only a fraction of the original population now survives. So the Sentinelese fear of outsiders is very understandable," Stephen Corry, the group's director, said in a statement.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Pence, China’s Xi trade tough talk at Pacific summit

Vice President Mike Pence and Chinese leader Xi Jinping exchanged barbs and tough talk in competing speeches to world leaders Saturday, with Pence warning the United States could double its tariffs on Beijing unless it bowed to U.S. demands.

Pence, speaking at the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) summit in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, showed no hint of compromise. He said the U.S. would not change its course until China changes its ways.

“We have taken decisive action to address our imbalance with China,” Pence said. “We put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and we could more than double that number.”

“We have taken decisive action to address our imbalance with China. We put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and we could more than double that number.”

— Vice President Mike Pence

China has retaliated with tariffs of its own on U.S. goods.

Video

Washington is demanding that China stop intellectual property theft against U.S. companies, slash a $375 million trade gap, cut industrial subsidies and improve access to Chinese markets.

President Trump was not at the summit, but will meet with Jinping in at the G-20 summit in Argentina that begins later this month, Reuters reported.

Pence also took aim at China’s construction of manmade islands in the Pacific and its “Belt and Road Initiative,” which involves billions of dollars of infrastructure development in Asia, Europe and Africa.

He called many of the projects low-quality ventures that saddle developing nations with loans they can’t afford, while saying the U.S. is a better partner.

"Know that the United States offers a better option. We don't drown our partners in a sea of debt, we don't coerce, compromise your independence," Pence said. "We do not offer a constricting belt or a one-way road. When you partner with us, we partner with you and we all prosper."

Pence has spent nearly a week attending Asian summits assailing China's military and economic influence, the Wall Street Journal reported.

China’s President Xi Jinping speaks during the APEC CEO Summit 2018 in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea on Saturday. (Associated Press)

Xi spoke before Pence, calling protectionism “shortsighted” and “doomed to fail.”

He expressed support for a global free trading system and said nations face a choice of cooperation as unilateralism spreads.

“History has shown that confrontation, whether in the form of a Cold War, hot war, or trade war will produce no winners,” Xi said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Iranian accused of procuring parts for IEDs used on US troops; $3M reward offered for capture

U.S. authorities this week announced a $3 million reward for the capture of an Iranian man accused of procuring parts from a Minnesota company later used to make roadside bombs targeting U.S. military forces in Iraq.

Hossein Ahmad Larijani went on the run after a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicted him in 2010 on charges related to the shipment of 6,000 radio transceiver modules made in the state, an FBI news release states.

The reward is being offered by the State Department.

According to the release, Larijani, 55, was assisted by companies in Iran and Singapore, along with four co-conspirators in Singapore, from 2007-08 in transporting the modules from the Minnesota company –referred to in court documents as Company A – to Iran.

Singapore-based Corezing International deceived the firm into shipping the devices to Singapore by telling it the components would be used in a local telecommunications project, the FBI said.

Once the shipments arrived in Singapore, they were allegedly shipped illegally to Iran and used to make remote detonation systems for improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The modules could transmit data from up to 40 miles away and were outfitted with encryption capabilities, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

“In addition to commercial uses, these same modules have other lethal and destructive applications,” the indictment said.

According to the indictment, between 2008 and 2009, U.S. and coalition forces retrieved numerous remote detonation systems in Iraq assembled using modules shipped from Minnesota.

Three of Larijani's co-conspirators were extradited to the U.S. where they served prison terms before being deported back to Singapore. One remains at large in Singapore, the FBI said.

The FBI believes Larijani is living in Tehran and poses an international flight risk.

Facebook CEO Zuckerberg won’t meet with European committee, will send VP instead

Instead of appearing before top European policymakers to answer questions about Facebook’s possible role in the spread of disinformation, CEO Mark Zuckerberg will send a representative.

Richard Allan, Facebook’s vice president for policy solutions, will testify Tuesday before a committee of lawmakers from Argentina, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Ireland, Latvia and Singapore, the Washington Post reported.

But Zuckerberg's decision to send a stand-in apparently hasn't gone over well in Europe.

“The Committee still believes that Mark Zuckerberg is the appropriate person to answer important questions about data privacy, safety, security and sharing,” committee members said jointly in a statement Friday.

FACEBOOK'S MARK ZUCKERBERG HAS NO PLAN TO STEP DOWN

European lawmakers have raised concerns over the way social media companies handle hate speech and terrorism on their platforms. In May, Zuckerberg was questioned about Facebook's mishaps by leaders in Brussels.

Video

In other parts of the world, the company has big business deals in the works. Facebook is preparing to host its first-ever data center in Asia in Singapore, which will cost the social media giant $1 billion.

Zuckerberg’s decision to not testify in front of the British-led committee comes as Facebook faces intense scrutiny over the way he and Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg have guided the company in recent years. Critics have called for him to step aside as chairman amid a series of scandals that have put the social media giant's credibility into question.

But the CEO recently indicated he has no intentions of leaving — and said he hopes to continue working with Sandberg.

On Wednesday, outgoing Facebook executive Elliot Schrage took responsibility for hiring a Republican opposition research firm to push back on its critics, Vanity Fair reported.

George Soros, the Democratic billionaire philanthropist, is a frequent target of conservative critics. (georgesoros.com)

The firm, known as Definers, was asked to investigate George Soros, the Democratic billionaire philanthropist who is a frequent target of conservatives. Soros has called for greater oversight of the tech company.

In response to Schrage's statement, Sandberg wrote that some Definers work "had crossed my desk," after previously saying she was unfamiliar with the company.

Facebook also been taken to task over how it handles users personal data and how it was allegedly used to incite violence against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar and Russian efforts to use the platform to sow discord ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

American killed by bow and arrow-wielding tribe while trying to visit remote Indian island

An American tourist trying to visit a lush, remote island in India has been killed by a tribe completely cut off from the outside world and known to attack outsiders with bows and arrows, police revealed Wednesday.

Indian officials have identified the victim as John Allen Chau, 27. They added that he was illegally ferried by fishermen to North Sentinel Island last week, part of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, a group of islands in the Bay of Bengal between India and Burma.

“Adventure awaits. So do leeches,” read the final post on his Instagram account, dated Nov. 2. On his Facebook profile, Chau described himself as a “soccer coach, traveller, and writer.” He often posted images of his worldwide exploits online, such as hikes in Washington state and prior trips to India.

Two police officials identified the victim to Reuters as John Allen Chau, 27. (Facebook)

Visitation to North Sentinel Island is heavily restricted by the Indian government and contact with the Sentinelese tribe who lives there is illegal to protect their indigenous way of life and prevent the spread of diseases.

The tribe is amongst the first people to successfully migrate out of Africa and scientists believe they arrived in the region some 60,000 years ago, the BBC reports.

A police source told Reuters that Chau is a preacher who had visited the area in the past and had a strong desire to meet the tribe. The source also claimed Chau expressed interest in preaching to them.

AMERICAN TOURIST, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO GRADUATE KILLED WHILE VACATIONING IN MEXICO, FAMILY WANTS ANSWERS

Dependera Pathak, director-general of police on India's Andaman and Nicobar Islands, told the Associated Press that Chau arrived in the region on Oct. 16 and stayed in a hotel while he prepared to visit the prohibited island.

He said Chau organized his visit to the island through a friend who hired seven fishermen for $325 to take him there on a boat, which also towed his kayak.

Chau went ashore in his kayak on Nov. 15 and sent the boat with the fishermen out to sea to avoid detection, Pathak said. He interacted with some of the tribespeople, giving them gifts he had prepared such as a football and fish. But the tribespeople became angry and shot an arrow at him which apparently hit a book he was carrying, Pathak said.

The American's kayak became damaged, so he swam to the fishermen's boat, which was waiting at a prearranged location. There he spent the night and wrote out his experiences on pages of paper which he gave to the fishermen, Pathak said.

In one of the notes handed over, according to the New York Times, Chau wrote about Jesus bestowing him with the strength to visit some of the most forbidden places on Earth.

Chau then set off for the island again the following day. Sources who spoke to AFP though said once he set foot on shore, he was “attacked by arrows but he continued walking.

“The fishermen saw the tribals tying a rope around his neck and dragging his body,” one source added.

Following Chau's death, the fishermen left for Port Blair, the capital of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, where they informed Chau's friend, who notified his family, Pathak said.

He said the family got in touch with Indian police and U.S. consular officials.

"It was a case of misdirected adventure," he added.

The body, according to Reuters, has not yet been recovered as of Wednesday, and those who took him to the island are said to have been arrested.

"The investigation in this matter is on," senior police officer Deepak Yadav said, announcing that the seven fishermen have been taken into custody.

It is not the first time someone has been attacked while trying to visit the island.

In 2006, two fishermen whose boat strayed into the waters around the island were killed – and their bodies have never been found, Reuters reports.

An Indian Coast Guard helicopter that had tried to land in the area to find the pair was forced to turn around after coming under fire by arrows, the news agency says.

Two years earlier, an Indian Navy helicopter that flew to the island to check up on its residents in the wake of the devastating Indian Ocean tsunami also was met with a greeting of arrows.

"So we knew that they were safe," one of the pilots told the BBC.

Chau has not been the first person to be attacked in the area of North Sentinel Island.

The U.S. Consulate in Chennai, in the capital of Tamil Nadu state, said it was aware of reports of Chau’s death but declined to comment further.

The International Christian Concern, a U.S.-based nonprofit that aims to fight persecution against Christians, called the death concerning.

“We here at International Christian Concern are extremely concerned by the reports of an American missionary being murdered in India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands," its regional manager, William Stark, said in a statement. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to both John’s family and friends."

Shiv Viswanathan, a social scientist at the Jindal Global Law School, said the island is a protected area and not open to tourists.

“The exact population of the tribe is not known, but it is declining,” Viswanathan said. “The government has to protect them.”

Survival International, an organization that works for the rights of tribal people, said the most recent killing should prompt Indian authorities to continue to protect the lands of the Sentinelese and other Andaman tribes.

"The British colonial occupation of the Andaman Islands decimated the tribes living there, wiping out thousands of tribespeople, and only a fraction of the original population now survives. So the Sentinelese fear of outsiders is very understandable," Stephen Corry, the group's director, said in a statement.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Pence, China’s Xi trade tough talk at Pacific summit

Vice President Mike Pence and Chinese leader Xi Jinping exchanged barbs and tough talk in competing speeches to world leaders Saturday, with Pence warning the United States could double its tariffs on Beijing unless it bowed to U.S. demands.

Pence, speaking at the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) summit in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, showed no hint of compromise. He said the U.S. would not change its course until China changes its ways.

“We have taken decisive action to address our imbalance with China,” Pence said. “We put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and we could more than double that number.”

“We have taken decisive action to address our imbalance with China. We put tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods, and we could more than double that number.”

— Vice President Mike Pence

China has retaliated with tariffs of its own on U.S. goods.

Video

Washington is demanding that China stop intellectual property theft against U.S. companies, slash a $375 million trade gap, cut industrial subsidies and improve access to Chinese markets.

President Trump was not at the summit, but will meet with Jinping in at the G-20 summit in Argentina that begins later this month, Reuters reported.

Pence also took aim at China’s construction of manmade islands in the Pacific and its “Belt and Road Initiative,” which involves billions of dollars of infrastructure development in Asia, Europe and Africa.

He called many of the projects low-quality ventures that saddle developing nations with loans they can’t afford, while saying the U.S. is a better partner.

"Know that the United States offers a better option. We don't drown our partners in a sea of debt, we don't coerce, compromise your independence," Pence said. "We do not offer a constricting belt or a one-way road. When you partner with us, we partner with you and we all prosper."

Pence has spent nearly a week attending Asian summits assailing China's military and economic influence, the Wall Street Journal reported.

China’s President Xi Jinping speaks during the APEC CEO Summit 2018 in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea on Saturday. (Associated Press)

Xi spoke before Pence, calling protectionism “shortsighted” and “doomed to fail.”

He expressed support for a global free trading system and said nations face a choice of cooperation as unilateralism spreads.

“History has shown that confrontation, whether in the form of a Cold War, hot war, or trade war will produce no winners,” Xi said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Iranian accused of procuring parts for IEDs used on US troops; $3M reward offered for capture

U.S. authorities this week announced a $3 million reward for the capture of an Iranian man accused of procuring parts from a Minnesota company later used to make roadside bombs targeting U.S. military forces in Iraq.

Hossein Ahmad Larijani went on the run after a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicted him in 2010 on charges related to the shipment of 6,000 radio transceiver modules made in the state, an FBI news release states.

The reward is being offered by the State Department.

According to the release, Larijani, 55, was assisted by companies in Iran and Singapore, along with four co-conspirators in Singapore, from 2007-08 in transporting the modules from the Minnesota company –referred to in court documents as Company A – to Iran.

Singapore-based Corezing International deceived the firm into shipping the devices to Singapore by telling it the components would be used in a local telecommunications project, the FBI said.

Once the shipments arrived in Singapore, they were allegedly shipped illegally to Iran and used to make remote detonation systems for improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The modules could transmit data from up to 40 miles away and were outfitted with encryption capabilities, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

“In addition to commercial uses, these same modules have other lethal and destructive applications,” the indictment said.

According to the indictment, between 2008 and 2009, U.S. and coalition forces retrieved numerous remote detonation systems in Iraq assembled using modules shipped from Minnesota.

Three of Larijani's co-conspirators were extradited to the U.S. where they served prison terms before being deported back to Singapore. One remains at large in Singapore, the FBI said.

The FBI believes Larijani is living in Tehran and poses an international flight risk.