Soy sauce ‘colon cleanse’ hoax leaves woman brain dead

A doctor has outlined a shocking case in which a woman was left brain dead after an internet hoax went horribly wrong. The incident, outlined on medical YouTube channel Chubbyemu, involves a 39-year-old woman, identified as CG, who presented to emergency services with a rapidly deteriorating mental status. Earlier that day the woman had been performing … Continue reading “Soy sauce ‘colon cleanse’ hoax leaves woman brain dead”

A doctor has outlined a shocking case in which a woman was left brain dead after an internet hoax went horribly wrong.

The incident, outlined on medical YouTube channel Chubbyemu, involves a 39-year-old woman, identified as CG, who presented to emergency services with a rapidly deteriorating mental status.

Earlier that day the woman had been performing a “soy sauce colon cleanse” — a dangerous internet fad which involves people drinking a liter of soy sauce in two hours.

The woman was already unwell – she had lost 24 pounds in the past three weeks and had started a white bread and canned fish-only diet six months ago.

She had also recently been released from a psychiatric hospital for what was believed to be paranoid schizophrenia.

The woman had the paranoid belief the government had poisoned her and had read online that the soy sauce colon cleanse would rid her body of toxins.

Soon after drinking the highly salt-laden soy sauce she felt her heart beating faster, a doctor based in the US identified only as Bernard said.

Bernard runs the popular Chubbyemu channel, which features videos on medical issues like kidney disease and cancer.

“She resisted all urges to drink any water. Over the next 30 minutes, while driving home, CG stopped on the side of the road and began to cry,” he said.

When CG got home she stumbled around and began mumbling unintelligibly. She then collapsed.

She was rushed to hospital and while en route went into cardiac arrest, before being resuscitated.

Several clues were available regarding what was wrong. Most immediately CB was suffering from acute hypernatremia – meaning she had extremely high levels of salt in her blood.

As Bernard explained, the “malicious” soy sauce challenge was based on half-truths.

It was claimed the challenge would cleanse a person’s colon by “evacuating the entire body of toxins”.

“The correct part is that wherever sodium is, water will flow towards it," he said.

“CG was told the soy sauce would stay in her colon. Toxin-filled water would then flow in and she’d be cleansed, but that’s not how it happens.”

He said the soy sauce brought huge amounts of salt into her stomach, which began sucking water from her muscles and organs.

The salt soon reached her brain, causing shrinkage, which can cause permanent brain damage.

Bernard said the doctors acted by infusing glucose-laden water into CG’s body.

The sugar was absorbed by her cells, which diluted her blood.

After the treatment, CG began to stabilise, but continued to drift in and out of consciousness.

Four days later she opened her eyes.

She exhibited dysarthria, dysphagia and quadriplegia. She was unable to move, swallow or speak.

She was diagnosed with central pontine myelinolysis, a form of damaged nerve cells.

According to Bernard, she should not have been able to drink the soy sauce.

“Almost no normal functioning human could drink almost half a pound of salt without vomiting,” he said.

“CG had some quality to her that could separate her mind from drinking soy sauce.”

He believes she had undiagnosed coeliac disease, an immune reaction to eating gluten, which manifested as psychosis and delusional disorder.

A microscopic examination of her cells revealed “marked villous blunting and atrophy”, a common sign of coeliac disease.

Bernard argued she developed gluten sensitivity, became delusional and was misdiagnosed – later falling victim to internet misinformation.

A study by Khalaf O Bushara entitled Neurological Presentation Of Coeliac Disease showed coeliac disease has long been associated with neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Click here for more from the Sun.

Body cam video captures moment police officer stops teen from jumping in front of train

An Illinois police officer was able to tackle a suicidal teenage girl just moments before she would have been hit by an approaching train, stunning body camera footage showed.

Waukegan police released footage Monday showing the moments leading up to the dramatic rescue.

In the video, no one appears to be in the area as the officers, searching for a suicidal teen, approach the train tracks — but as soon as the crossing gates are activated by the approaching train, a young woman comes out from behind the railroad mechanical shed.

After the girl disobeyed officers' commands to stop, one of the cops jumps into action, tackling the 17-year-old girl before she could step in front of the train.

“I am extremely proud of these officers who, through their heroic actions, saved the life of a young woman,” Chief Wayne Walles said in a statement.

Officials said they received a call Friday at about 1:40 a.m. from a woman who said her teenage sister was going to take her own life by standing in front of an oncoming train. Dispatchers were able to locate the girl by “pinging” her cellphone.

“I am just so proud of our dispatch who utilized their resources to locate the area where this young woman was and directed the responding officers to find her,” Walles said.

AS DOCTORS TAPER OR END OPIOID PRESCRIPTIONS, MANY PATIENTS DRIVEN TO DESPAIR, SUICIDE

Police said the girl was taken to the hospital for a psychiatric evaluation.

Joe Florip, a spokesman for the Waukegan Police Department, told the Chicago Tribune they released the photo because they recognize mental health is a huge issue.

“We thought this might be a huge catalyst for people who need help to get some help,” he said. "That’s why we included the suicide hotline number in the press release.”

He added: “We are also very proud of our police and dispatchers for the work they do on a daily basis. Sometimes the public doesn’t realize these are the type of things they are asked to do.”

Lucia I. Suarez Sang is a Reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

Pete Davidson to bullies: I’d never take my own life

Pete Davidson says that no matter how much he’s bullied, he would never take his own life.

"I've kept my mouth shut," he wrote in a lengthy Instagram post on Monday. "Never mentioned any names, never said a word about anyone or anything. I'm trying to understand how when something happens to a guy the whole entire world just trashes him without any facts or frame of reference. Especially in today's climate where everyone loves to be offended and upset it truly is mind-boggling."

Davidson, who split from fiancé Ariana Grande in October, added that he's been bullied online and in public for nine months.

"I've spoken about [borderline personality disorder] and being suicidal publicly only in the hopes that it will help bring awareness and help kids like myself who don't want to be on this earth," he continued. "I just want you guys to know. No matter how hard the internet or anyone tries to make me kill myself. I won't. I'm upset I even have to say this."

He ended the note by thanking all the people who have been supporting him.

"To all those holding me down and seeing this for what it is – I see you and I love you," he wrote.

Davidson broke his silence about his breakup last month while co-hosting a benefit with Judd Apatow.

"Well, as you could tell, I don't want to be here. There's a lot going on," he said. "Does anybody have any open rooms? Looking for a roommate?"

Davidson opened up to Variety about his struggle with borderline personality disorder in August, revealing he tried to drown himself after his father passed away in the 9/11 attacks.

This story originally appeared on the New York Post's Page Six.

Melania Trump calls opioid epidemic ‘worst drug crisis in American history’

LYNCHBURG, Va. – First lady Melania Trump called the opioid epidemic the "worst drug crisis in American history" during a town-hall meeting with students at Liberty University in Virginia on Wednesday. 

"When I took on opioid abuse as one of one of my pillars of my initiative 'Be Best,' I did it with the goal of helping children of all ages," the first lady said. "I have visited several hospitals and facilities that are dedicated to helping all who have been affected with this disease, including people who are addicted, babies born addicted and families coping with the addiction of a loved one."

Trump said she viewed the opportunity to talk to students at Liberty University — one of the world’s largest Christian universities – as important and coming at a critical stage of their lives as they make decisions on how they will manage the stress that comes with being an adult.

First lady Melania Trump speaking during a town-hall meeting on opioid addiction at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

“If you or someone you know needs help, you need to be brave enough to ask, or strong enough to stand with them as they fight through the disease. You need to be educated enough to know the signs of addiction and secure enough to talk about it and keep talking about it until help arrives,” Trump said.

The first lady then challenged students to think of the opioid crisis not as a set of statistics, but rather as a larger “human story” and as an opportunity to save lives.

MELANIA TRUMP UNVEILS BE BEST INITIATIVE TO HELP KIDS

Charis Gnanakan, a 20-year-old Liberty Univerity senior studying strategic communication, told Fox News she was moved by the first lady's assertion that the opioid crisis is part of a larger human story.

“I think she's right in her urge for everyone to be prepared to help those who are addicted,” said Joshua Smith, a 20-year-old accounting major.

First lady Melania Trump speaking at "Battling the Opioid Crisis" at Liberty University. (Fox News)

More than 13,000 students attended the event titled “Battling the Opioid Crisis.”

Political commentator, author and former Fox News host Eric Bolling, whose 19-year-old son Eric Chase Bolling died due to an accidental opioid overdose in 2017, moderated the panel after the first lady's speech. 

The panel included Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Liberty President Jerry Falwell and his wife, Becki Falwell.

TRUMP SIGNS BIPARTISAN OPIOID BILL AIMED AT CURBING NATIONAL CRISIS

Their overall message emphasized the need for more awareness on how opioid addictions start and the importance of extreme precaution when taking prescription narcotics.

“Most people becoming addicted to opioids today were first prescribed a legal painkiller," Azar said.

Students listening to a panel on "Battling the Opioid Crisis" at Liberty University. (Fox News)

Last month, President Trump signed a bipartisan bill into law that aimed at making medical treatment for opioid addiction more widely available while also cracking down on illicit drugs being sent through the mail.

Calli Thurlow, 19, a sophomore studying social work, said she appreciated political leaders finally speaking out on the health issue.

“Being in social work, you see families torn apart by the opioid crisis every day. People coming together on all sides to combat it is something really amazing to see for our country,” she said.

Liberty University students at first lady Melania Trump’s speech on the opioid crisis. (Fox News)

Students were encouraged via university social media to "make their voice heard" and email personal questions for the panel.

On how students could make a difference, Bolling encouraged them to talk to friends and family if they see someone slipping into addiction and to fight against promoting the stigma of shame that often comes with addiction.

“It was incredible to see the administration taking such active steps, both in awareness and financial support, to protect our communities," Kyler Beal, a digital media senior, said. 

Fox News’ Alex Hein contributed to this report.

Construction worker suicide rates are highest in the US, CDC study says

Males working in construction have the highest suicide rates in the country, according to a recent analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Comparing the suicides of more than 22,000 people across 17 states in 2012 and 2015, researchers found males working in construction and extraction took their lives the most often, a rate of roughly 44 per 100,000 “civilian noninstitutionalized working persons” for construction workers and 53 per 100,000 for extraction workers.

ADENOVIRUS OUTBREAK IN NEW JERSEY KILLS 11, OFFICIALS ORDER CENTER TO SEPARATE PATIENTS

Men working in the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media came in second — an increase of 47 percent during the years studied, according to the CDC. Installation, maintenance and repair rounded out the top three for males in 2015.

Comparatively, in 2015, women working in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media had the highest suicide rates for females, while women in protective services came in second. The third were women who worked in health care support, according to the study.

“Among both males and females, the lowest suicide rate in 2015 was observed in Education, Training, and Library occupations,” the CDC reported.

The research comes adjacent to the rising suicide rates in the U.S. overall. The health agency announced in June the rates have been rising in “nearly every state,” with 25 states reporting a more than 30 percent increase during the study period.

SUCKING ON YOUR BABY’S PACIFIER TO CLEAN IT MAY BE GOOD FOR THEIR HEALTH, STUDY SAYS

“Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said in an online statement. “Knowing who is at greater risk for suicide can help save lives through focused prevention efforts.”

The study Thursday is a correction to a similar 2016 study, which mistakenly included the misclassification of some workers as farmers instead of managers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Construction worker suicide rates are highest in the US, CDC study says

Males working in construction have the highest suicide rates in the country, according to a recent analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Comparing the suicides of more than 22,000 people across 17 states in 2012 and 2015, researchers found males working in construction and extraction took their lives the most often, a rate of roughly 44 per 100,000 “civilian noninstitutionalized working persons” for construction workers and 53 per 100,000 for extraction workers.

ADENOVIRUS OUTBREAK IN NEW JERSEY KILLS 11, OFFICIALS ORDER CENTER TO SEPARATE PATIENTS

Men working in the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media came in second — an increase of 47 percent during the years studied, according to the CDC. Installation, maintenance and repair rounded out the top three for males in 2015.

Comparatively, in 2015, women working in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media had the highest suicide rates for females, while women in protective services came in second. The third were women who worked in health care support, according to the study.

“Among both males and females, the lowest suicide rate in 2015 was observed in Education, Training, and Library occupations,” the CDC reported.

The research comes adjacent to the rising suicide rates in the U.S. overall. The health agency announced in June the rates have been rising in “nearly every state,” with 25 states reporting a more than 30 percent increase during the study period.

SUCKING ON YOUR BABY’S PACIFIER TO CLEAN IT MAY BE GOOD FOR THEIR HEALTH, STUDY SAYS

“Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said in an online statement. “Knowing who is at greater risk for suicide can help save lives through focused prevention efforts.”

The study Thursday is a correction to a similar 2016 study, which mistakenly included the misclassification of some workers as farmers instead of managers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Construction worker suicide rates are highest in the US, CDC study says

Males working in construction have the highest suicide rates in the country, according to a recent analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Comparing the suicides of more than 22,000 people across 17 states in 2012 and 2015, researchers found males working in construction and extraction took their lives the most often, a rate of roughly 44 per 100,000 “civilian noninstitutionalized working persons” for construction workers and 53 per 100,000 for extraction workers.

ADENOVIRUS OUTBREAK IN NEW JERSEY KILLS 11, OFFICIALS ORDER CENTER TO SEPARATE PATIENTS

Men working in the arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media came in second — an increase of 47 percent during the years studied, according to the CDC. Installation, maintenance and repair rounded out the top three for males in 2015.

Comparatively, in 2015, women working in arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media had the highest suicide rates for females, while women in protective services came in second. The third were women who worked in health care support, according to the study.

“Among both males and females, the lowest suicide rate in 2015 was observed in Education, Training, and Library occupations,” the CDC reported.

The research comes adjacent to the rising suicide rates in the U.S. overall. The health agency announced in June the rates have been rising in “nearly every state,” with 25 states reporting a more than 30 percent increase during the study period.

SUCKING ON YOUR BABY’S PACIFIER TO CLEAN IT MAY BE GOOD FOR THEIR HEALTH, STUDY SAYS

“Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said in an online statement. “Knowing who is at greater risk for suicide can help save lives through focused prevention efforts.”

The study Thursday is a correction to a similar 2016 study, which mistakenly included the misclassification of some workers as farmers instead of managers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.