Nebraska man who killed wife decades ago admits killing parents, niece

A Nebraska man who pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the death of his wife two decades ago admitted Monday to fatally shooting his parents and an 18-year-old niece last year. John Dalton Jr., 46, pleaded guilty to three counts of first-degree murder and four weapons counts in Douglas County District Court. He was sentenced to … Continue reading “Nebraska man who killed wife decades ago admits killing parents, niece”

A Nebraska man who pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the death of his wife two decades ago admitted Monday to fatally shooting his parents and an 18-year-old niece last year.

John Dalton Jr., 46, pleaded guilty to three counts of first-degree murder and four weapons counts in Douglas County District Court. He was sentenced to three life terms plus up to 230 years in prison.

"They're looking for answers — and they're asking lots of questions — but sometimes there are none. It's just pure evil," chief deputy Douglas County attorney Brenda Beadle said. "If ever there was a case that warranted the maximum sentence, this is it."

Dalton was arrested in Tennessee on Dec. 27, 2017, and accused of shooting 70-year-old John Dalton Sr., 65-year-old Jean Dalton and Leonna Dalton-Phillip in his parents' Omaha home. Investigators said another niece, age 6, was also present but hid under a couch and was able to identify the younger Dalton as the shooter.

Dalton was paroled in 2010 after spending 11 years in jail for the September 1998 death of his wife Shannon. After that shooting, Dalton fled to Tennessee, where he was captured a few days later

The couple had three daughters, all of whom were at home when the shooting took place. Dalton's youngest daughter, Alicia, said Monday that the deaths of her grandparents and cousin were devastating.

"In a matter of seconds," she said, "everything I had was lost."

In addition to the manslaughter conviction, Dalton's criminal record included convictions for delivery of cocaine, and leaving the scene of an accident and fleeing to avoid arrest in the early 1990s.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Midwest snowstorm cancels hundreds of flights as holiday weekend winds down

A massive storm blanketed much of the central Midwest with snow Sunday, canceling hundreds of flights at airports in Chicago and Kansas City and forcing parts of some major highways to shut down as the Thanksgiving holiday weekend drew to a close.

The National Weather Service on Sunday issued blizzard and winter storm warnings for much of the central Plains and Great Lakes region. According to flight-tracking website FlightAware, 1,200 flights headed to or from the U.S. were canceled.

A fast-moving winter storm is expected to blanket much of the central Midwest with snow. (AP)

FlightAware reported that 792 flights into or out of Chicago's O'Hare International Airport had been canceled as of 9 p.m. local time, with another 426 flights experiencing delays. Another 124 flights into or out of Chicago Midway International Airport were canceled, with 83 other flights experiencing delays.

Kansas City International Airport closed to arriving flights at approximately 2:30 p.m. local time due to visibility that was reduced to less than a quarter-mile. The airport re-opened to arrivals approximately four hours later.

A total of 188 flights into and out of Kansas City were canceled as of 9 p.m. local time, with another 35 flights experiencing delays.

In St. Louis, a tornado warning was issued for an area including Lambert International Airport shortly before 5 p.m. local time. It was not immediately clear how many flights were affected. The warning expired approximately 15 minutes later.

Strong winds and snow created blizzard-like conditions across much of Nebraska and parts of Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri. The National Weather Service was warning those conditions would make travel difficult in places.

By midday, the blizzard warning had extended to parts of eastern Illinois near Chicago, where snow is forecast to fall at a rate of about 2 inches per hour. On Sunday evening, the warning was extended to Chicago and surrounding counties. It was set to expire at 9 a.m. Monday.

Other parts of the Central Plains and Great Lakes region were under a winter storm warning, that could see a foot or more of snow dumped in some places by the end of the day.

DEADLY WILDFIRE '100 PERCENT CONTAINED' AS GRIM SEARCH CONTINUES

In eastern Nebraska, part of Interstate 80 between Lincoln and Omaha was closed Sunday morning because of multiple accidents after snow blanketed that area. That included semitrailer trucks jackknifed across the highway. It was re-opened by Sunday afternoon.

Traffic moves west along I-70 near Lawrence, Kan., Sunday. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

In Kansas, Gov. Jeff Colyer issued a state of emergency declaration. The action came as a large stretch of Interstate 70, spanning much of the state, was closed between Junction City and WaKeeney.

Kearney resident Amy Scott told the Kansas City Star her brother-in-law, his wife and their son were hoping to make it as far as Salina, Kan., on Sunday evening. They reported seeing numerous crashes on Interstate 70, including an ambulance that was tipped over on its side. Scott added that the group was stuck on the highway for approximately an hour and hoped not to run out of gas.

AIR FORCE FAMILY FOUND DEAD IN THANKSGIVING SUV CRASH

"They wanted to get as far as they could because they were supposed to be back to work tomorrow [Monday],” Scott told the paper. “I’m just saying prayers for them and others who have to be out on the roads. I wish they didn’t have to, but I understood why they did have to.”

Separately, a portion of Interstate 29 was shut down in Missouri, near the Iowa border. As much as a foot was expected in Chicago. The weather service said on Twitter Sunday night that Kansas City International Airport got 5.3 inches of snow, and at least 7 inches fell in Rockford, Illinois.

Forecasters predict more than a foot of snow is likely in southeast Nebraska, northeast Kansas, northwest Missouri, and southwest Iowa. By Monday morning, the storm was expected to hit parts of northern Indiana and southern Michigan.

Schools in parts of Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois called off Monday classes.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Midwest snowstorm cancels hundreds of flights as holiday weekend winds down

A massive storm blanketed much of the central Midwest with snow Sunday, canceling hundreds of flights at airports in Chicago and Kansas City and forcing parts of some major highways to shut down as the Thanksgiving holiday weekend drew to a close.

The National Weather Service on Sunday issued blizzard and winter storm warnings for much of the central Plains and Great Lakes region. According to flight-tracking website FlightAware, 1,200 flights headed to or from the U.S. were canceled.

A fast-moving winter storm is expected to blanket much of the central Midwest with snow. (AP)

FlightAware reported that 792 flights into or out of Chicago's O'Hare International Airport had been canceled as of 9 p.m. local time, with another 426 flights experiencing delays. Another 124 flights into or out of Chicago Midway International Airport were canceled, with 83 other flights experiencing delays.

Kansas City International Airport closed to arriving flights at approximately 2:30 p.m. local time due to visibility that was reduced to less than a quarter-mile. The airport re-opened to arrivals approximately four hours later.

A total of 188 flights into and out of Kansas City were canceled as of 9 p.m. local time, with another 35 flights experiencing delays.

In St. Louis, a tornado warning was issued for an area including Lambert International Airport shortly before 5 p.m. local time. It was not immediately clear how many flights were affected. The warning expired approximately 15 minutes later.

Strong winds and snow created blizzard-like conditions across much of Nebraska and parts of Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri. The National Weather Service was warning those conditions would make travel difficult in places.

By midday, the blizzard warning had extended to parts of eastern Illinois near Chicago, where snow is forecast to fall at a rate of about 2 inches per hour. On Sunday evening, the warning was extended to Chicago and surrounding counties. It was set to expire at 9 a.m. Monday.

Other parts of the Central Plains and Great Lakes region were under a winter storm warning, that could see a foot or more of snow dumped in some places by the end of the day.

DEADLY WILDFIRE '100 PERCENT CONTAINED' AS GRIM SEARCH CONTINUES

In eastern Nebraska, part of Interstate 80 between Lincoln and Omaha was closed Sunday morning because of multiple accidents after snow blanketed that area. That included semitrailer trucks jackknifed across the highway. It was re-opened by Sunday afternoon.

Traffic moves west along I-70 near Lawrence, Kan., Sunday. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

In Kansas, Gov. Jeff Colyer issued a state of emergency declaration. The action came as a large stretch of Interstate 70, spanning much of the state, was closed between Junction City and WaKeeney.

Kearney resident Amy Scott told the Kansas City Star her brother-in-law, his wife and their son were hoping to make it as far as Salina, Kan., on Sunday evening. They reported seeing numerous crashes on Interstate 70, including an ambulance that was tipped over on its side. Scott added that the group was stuck on the highway for approximately an hour and hoped not to run out of gas.

AIR FORCE FAMILY FOUND DEAD IN THANKSGIVING SUV CRASH

"They wanted to get as far as they could because they were supposed to be back to work tomorrow [Monday],” Scott told the paper. “I’m just saying prayers for them and others who have to be out on the roads. I wish they didn’t have to, but I understood why they did have to.”

Separately, a portion of Interstate 29 was shut down in Missouri, near the Iowa border. As much as a foot was expected in Chicago. The weather service said on Twitter Sunday night that Kansas City International Airport got 5.3 inches of snow, and at least 7 inches fell in Rockford, Illinois.

Forecasters predict more than a foot of snow is likely in southeast Nebraska, northeast Kansas, northwest Missouri, and southwest Iowa. By Monday morning, the storm was expected to hit parts of northern Indiana and southern Michigan.

Schools in parts of Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois called off Monday classes.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Blizzard stymies travel across Midwest, as hundreds of flights canceled and ‘thundersnow’ reported

The first major winter storm of the season targeting the Midwest at the end of the busy Thanksgiving weekend has created travel headaches that stretched into Monday, with hundreds of flights grounded and major highways closed.

The National Weather Service said the storm has dropped over a foot of snow from parts of the Mississippi Valley into the greater Chicago area, where heavy snow was beginning to taper off as daylight broke.

The storm was strong enough to cause "thundersnow" in some areas, which prompted a warning from the NWS' Chicago office.

"…just because it is snowing, does not diminish the dangers from lightning," the agency said. "Remember, if you're close enough to hear thunder or see lightning, you should seek shelter indoors! Shoveling or snow blowing can wait!"

The storm was also bringing wind gusts up to 50 mph throughout northern Illinois, leading to whiteout conditions on area highways. The strong winds also caused power outages for tens of thousands of people across the Chicago area, FOX32 reported.

For travelers flying out of Chicago's two main airports, the winter storm put their plans on hold. As of Monday morning, over 800 flights were canceled at O'Hare International Airport, while Midway International Airport reported about 70 flights had been canceled, according to the Chicago Department of Aviation.

"Make sure that you give yourself plenty of time and if all possible, do not travel if you don't have to," said Alicia Tate-Nadeau, the executive director of the Chicago's Office of Emergency Management and Communications.

Crews de-ice an American Airlines plane at O’Hare International Airport on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Noreen Nasir)

One Chicago native trying to fly to Orlando, Florida, chided himself for not heeding the forecast.

"I knew it was right around the corner, and behold I stayed that one extra day and paid the price. So I was able to spend the evening here at beautiful O'Hare and had plenty of company," Mark McCoy told the Associated Press.

"It's all part of the Thanksgiving travel experience," he added.

A commuter walks to a bus stop as snow falls, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)

Further west in Kansas City, which got the brunt of the storm on Sunday, officials warned travelers that morning flights out of Kansas City International Airport were facing cancellations due to aircraft not being able to get in.

The airport was forced to close for several hours due to low visibility and heavy snow, as maintenance crews had to clear the runway.

Bridget Fortner, who was trying to get to Newark, New Jersey with her family had to connect through Chicago and had their original flight canceled.

"It's gonna be a long day," she told FOX4.

MIDWEST SNOWSTORM CANCELS HUNDREDS OF FLIGHTS AS HOLIDAY WEEKEND WINDS DOWN

Drivers trying to get around the region did not have any better luck.

This Nov. 25, 2018 photo which was released by the Nebraska State Patrol, shows a broken up trailer amid blowing snow on Interstate 80 near Bradshaw, Neb. (Nebraska State Patrol via AP)

In Kansas, a large stretch of Interstate 70, spanning much of the state, was closed between Junction City and WaKeeney on Sunday, and Gov. Jeff Colyer declared a state of emergency. Separately, a portion of Interstate 29 was shut down due to heavy snow in Missouri, near the Iowa border.

Heavy snow also left motorists stranded in western Illinois, forcing police to use snowmobiles to rescue people trapped in their cars.

Illinois State police and LaSalle County emergency management said crews were removing people from their cars by snowmobile and urged people to stay off the roads into Monday, WBBM-TV reported.

Conditions are expected to improve Monday as the storm system moves out, but downed tree limbs and power lines will continue to affect people throughout the day.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed

Nebraska cockfighting bust leads to 32 arrests

OMAHA, Neb. – Nebraska authorities arrested 32 men and seized 186 roosters when they broke up a cockfighting event.

The Omaha World-Herald reports the Nebraska Humane Society raided a farm near Louisville, Nebraska, on Saturday after receiving a tip about a cockfighting event there.

Mark Langan with the Nebraska Humane Society says the raid broke up a large, well-organized cockfighting operation.

The men who were arrested range in age between 20 and 67. They all face charges of participating, viewing or promoting cockfighting. Two juveniles were also detained.

Cass County Sheriff William Brueggemann says the two property owners said they didn't know why so many people were on their property.

Many others at the cockfighting event were able to escape into fields near the property before officers could arrest them.

Winter storm to bring ‘hazardous’ conditions during busy post-Thanksgiving travel rush

A vigorous winter storm across the nation's midsection may throw a wrench in plans for millions of Americans making their way home on Sunday on one of the busiest travel days of the year.

The National Weather Service said that the winter storm is expected to bring near-blizzard conditions from the Central Plains into the Great Lakes, impacting the Kansas City and Chicago metro areas the hardest.

"It's going to impact many going home after this long holiday weekend," Fox News' Chief Meteorologist Rick Reichmuth said Sunday on "Fox & Friends."

Heavy snow is expected to fall throughout the day on Sunday, with many areas seeing between 6 to 12 inches from eastern Kansas, Iowa, Northern Missouri and into Illinois. Some places may see up to 18 inches and strong winds, according to the NWS.

"We'll see some spots over a foot of snow, a lot of places 6 to 12 inches, and that means a lot of troubles all over the roads," Reichmuth said.

In Illinois, state officials warned drivers that conditions are expected to deteriorate throughout the day, with heavy snow, high winds, and "much longer travel times" to be anticipated.

“This storm is expected to hit at a time when millions of people are on the roads, heading home after visiting friends and family,” Illinois Transportation Secretary Randy Blankenhorn said in a statement. “Please take all necessary precautions, including altering travel plans to leave early or asking yourself if your trip can wait.”

At Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, the sixth-busiest in the world, at least 197 flights were canceled as of Sunday morning, according to flight tracking website FlightAware. Nationwide, FlightAware reported that nearly 500 flights were canceled on the last day of the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

Weekend storm threatens to snarl Thanksgiving travel

Airline travelers brace for delays as they head home from Thanksgiving; Jacqui Heinrich reports from LaGuardia Airport in New York.

The site reported that the majority of the cancellations are flights that were supposed to be routed through Chicago or Kansas City — two areas forecast to be hit hard by the storm.

MAJOR SNOW STORM IN CENTRAL U.S. THREATENS THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY WEEKEND TRAVEL

Several airlines that operate out of Kansas City International Airport were waiving fees for rebooking flights due to the storm, FOX4 reported.

Many in the region decided to hit the road on Saturday in order to beat the oncoming storm, filling area gas stations.

"I`m a college student at Mizzou and I`m trying to beat the storm back," graduate student Sydney Eastman told FOX4. "When I saw the weather, I thought I better get out of here now."

In Nebraska, the state highway patrol said that Interstate 80 was closed westbound from Mahoney to Lincoln because of "multiple crashes."

Multiple crashes were reported on Interstate 80 in Nebraska due to the snow. (Nebraska State Patrol)

Authorities in Kansas said that Interstate 70 was shut down in several places Sunday morning due to drifting snow, and several crashes were reported.

Kansas Highway Patrol Public Information Officer Tod Hileman posted a video to Twitter showing the conditions, which read: “We have 100% snowpacked & iced roads with drifting. Winds are near 45 to 50 at times. There are many slide offs. We have jackknifed semi’s in Gove, Ellis and Russell Counties!”

For those who decide to wait to let the storm pass, conditions are expected to improve by Monday across the region with partly-sunny skies and temperatures into the 30s, according to the NWS.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed

Midwest snowstorm cancels hundreds of flights as holiday weekend winds down

A massive storm blanketed much of the central Midwest with snow Sunday, canceling hundreds of flights at airports in Chicago and Kansas City and forcing parts of some major highways to shut down as the Thanksgiving holiday weekend drew to a close.

The National Weather Service on Sunday issued blizzard and winter storm warnings for much of the central Plains and Great Lakes region. According to flight-tracking website FlightAware, 1,200 flights headed to or from the U.S. were canceled.

A fast-moving winter storm is expected to blanket much of the central Midwest with snow. (AP)

FlightAware reported that 792 flights into or out of Chicago's O'Hare International Airport had been canceled as of 9 p.m. local time, with another 426 flights experiencing delays. Another 124 flights into or out of Chicago Midway International Airport were canceled, with 83 other flights experiencing delays.

Kansas City International Airport closed to arriving flights at approximately 2:30 p.m. local time due to visibility that was reduced to less than a quarter-mile. The airport re-opened to arrivals approximately four hours later.

A total of 188 flights into and out of Kansas City were canceled as of 9 p.m. local time, with another 35 flights experiencing delays.

In St. Louis, a tornado warning was issued for an area including Lambert International Airport shortly before 5 p.m. local time. It was not immediately clear how many flights were affected. The warning expired approximately 15 minutes later.

Strong winds and snow created blizzard-like conditions across much of Nebraska and parts of Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri. The National Weather Service was warning those conditions would make travel difficult in places.

By midday, the blizzard warning had extended to parts of eastern Illinois near Chicago, where snow is forecast to fall at a rate of about 2 inches per hour. On Sunday evening, the warning was extended to Chicago and surrounding counties. It was set to expire at 9 a.m. Monday.

Other parts of the Central Plains and Great Lakes region were under a winter storm warning, that could see a foot or more of snow dumped in some places by the end of the day.

DEADLY WILDFIRE '100 PERCENT CONTAINED' AS GRIM SEARCH CONTINUES

In eastern Nebraska, part of Interstate 80 between Lincoln and Omaha was closed Sunday morning because of multiple accidents after snow blanketed that area. That included semitrailer trucks jackknifed across the highway. It was re-opened by Sunday afternoon.

Traffic moves west along I-70 near Lawrence, Kan., Sunday. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

In Kansas, Gov. Jeff Colyer issued a state of emergency declaration. The action came as a large stretch of Interstate 70, spanning much of the state, was closed between Junction City and WaKeeney.

Kearney resident Amy Scott told the Kansas City Star her brother-in-law, his wife and their son were hoping to make it as far as Salina, Kan., on Sunday evening. They reported seeing numerous crashes on Interstate 70, including an ambulance that was tipped over on its side. Scott added that the group was stuck on the highway for approximately an hour and hoped not to run out of gas.

AIR FORCE FAMILY FOUND DEAD IN THANKSGIVING SUV CRASH

"They wanted to get as far as they could because they were supposed to be back to work tomorrow [Monday],” Scott told the paper. “I’m just saying prayers for them and others who have to be out on the roads. I wish they didn’t have to, but I understood why they did have to.”

Separately, a portion of Interstate 29 was shut down in Missouri, near the Iowa border. As much as a foot was expected in Chicago. The weather service said on Twitter Sunday night that Kansas City International Airport got 5.3 inches of snow, and at least 7 inches fell in Rockford, Illinois.

Forecasters predict more than a foot of snow is likely in southeast Nebraska, northeast Kansas, northwest Missouri, and southwest Iowa. By Monday morning, the storm was expected to hit parts of northern Indiana and southern Michigan.

Schools in parts of Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois called off Monday classes.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.