Mexico theme park still offering ‘Night Walk’ illegal border crossing experience, amid migrant crisis

The treacherous trek to illegally cross into the United States is rife with peril, as migrants risk death, sexual assault and separation from their loved ones. And for less than $20, tourists can join in the journey. As the migrant crisis continues to unfold along the southern border, visitors looking for a fully-immersive experience can pay … Continue reading “Mexico theme park still offering ‘Night Walk’ illegal border crossing experience, amid migrant crisis”

The treacherous trek to illegally cross into the United States is rife with peril, as migrants risk death, sexual assault and separation from their loved ones. And for less than $20, tourists can join in the journey.

As the migrant crisis continues to unfold along the southern border, visitors looking for a fully-immersive experience can pay for the opportunity to become an immigrant for the night at a theme park in Mexico. Parque EcoAlberto in El Alberto advertises the "Night Walk" online as a "totally different and unique concept" that allows participants to reenact an illegal border crossing into the U.S.

The "Caminata Nocturna," also known as the "Night Walk" to play the role of an illegal immigrant crossing the border. (EcoAlberto.com)

The theme park, located about 80 miles north of Mexico City, has been offering the attraction since 2004, and participants can choose to fork out $17 ($350 Mexican pesos) for the typical version or $24 ($500 in Mexican pesos) for an "extreme" version that lasts an additional six hours.

Participants begin their journey at a local Catholic church, where they received a motivational talk that describes the attraction as being about creating awareness of immigration issues and providing a source of employment for area residents.

Maribel Garcia, an administrator at the park, told PBS in 2013 the region faced hardships after previously relying on agriculture and the park was seen as a way to create jobs to keep people in Mexico.

MIGRANT GROUP DEMANDS TRUMP EITHER LET THEM IN OR PAY THEM EACH $50G TO TURN AROUND: REPORT

“Our objective is to stop the immigration that exists amongst our citizens, principally from the state of Mexico to the U.S.,” Garcia told PBS at the time.

During the "Night Walk," guests are eventually led through a mountainous area at night with dark trails, where eventually guests are treated to a "great surprise" at the end.

During the experience, participants receive a motivational talk before going on a trek through a mountainous area. (EcoAlberto.com)

While guests may not actually break the law and cross the border illegally, the park makes sure that the experience is as realistic as possible. A video promoting the park shows guests being chased by a mock-border patrol vehicle, and also encountering cartel members.

The experience is also not for those looking to take a stroll in the dark. Officials advertise the attraction as one only for those who are in "good physical condition" and participants are advised to wear comfortable clothing.

For those who don't want to partake in the experience, there are plenty of other options at the park, including rock climbing, kayaking and boat rides in the Tula River. The theme park also offers cabins and a camping area for guests to stay during their visit.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed

Migrant group demand Trump either let them in or pay them each $50G to turn around: report

Two groups of Central American migrants marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana on Tuesday with a list of demands, with one group delivering an ultimatum to the Trump administration: either let them in the U.S. or pay them $50,000 each to go home, a report said.

Among other demands were that deportations be halted and that asylum seekers be processed faster and in greater numbers, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

The first group of caravan members, that included about 100 migrants, arrived at the consulate around 11 a.m. Alfonso Guerreo Ulloa, an organizer from Honduras, said the $50,000 figure was chosen as a group.

“It may seem like a lot of money to you,” Ulloa told the paper. “But it is a small sum compared to everything the United States has stolen from Honduras.”

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He said the money would allow the migrants to return home and start a small business.

A letter from the group criticized U.S. intervention in Central America and asked the U.S. to remove Honduran President Orlando Hernandez from office. They gave the consulate 72 hours to respond.

A letter from the second group of about 50 migrants arrived at the consulate around 1:20 p.m. asking the U.S. to speed up the asylum process and to admit up to 300 asylum seekers each day at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego. Currently, around 40 to 100 are admitted.

EIGHT-MONTH-OLD BOY PUSHED UNDER HOLE IN BORDER WALL

“In the meantime, families, women and children who have fled our countries continue to suffer and the civil society of Tijuana continue to be forced to confront this humanitarian crisis, a refugee crisis caused in great part by decades of U.S. intervention in Central America,” the letter states.

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Of the roughly 6,000 migrants who’ve traveled from Central America to Tijuana, around 700 have returned home, 300 have been deported and 2,500 have applied for humanitarian visas in Mexico, according to Xochtil Castillo, a caravan member who met with Mexican officials Tuesday.

MIGRANT CARAVAN SHELTER SHUT DOWN OVER 'BAD SANITARY CONDITIONS' AS HUNDREDS MOVE TO NEW FACILITY

Others have either crossed into the U.S. illegally, moved to other parts of Mexico or have fallen through the cracks, the Union-Tribune said.

“A lot of people are leaving because there is no solution here,” said Douglas Matute, 38, of Tijuana. “We thought they would let us in. But Trump sent the military instead of social workers.”

Migrants put US asylum plans on hold as they seek temp jobs in Tijuana

SAN DIEGO – Thousands of asylum-seeking migrants from Central America are starting to pick up day jobs in Mexico as they wait for their shot at legal entry into the United States.

Even though America is the ultimate goal, migrants including 20-year-old Josue Pineda understand it can take up to several months to get the asylum process rolling.

“Most of these people are still dreaming of America, but if there’s a chance to get a job here, there’s no way I’m not going to take it,” the Honduran migrant told NPR recently.

Pineda and hundreds of other migrants spend their mornings looking for work.

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Most days they won’t know where they’re going or when they’ll be back. In a majority of cases, they’re just happy to leave the stifling conditions of the overcrowded, grimy shelters at the border. And, they get to pick up some cash to make their lives easier while waiting for asylum.

“Here you make a little money,” said Nelson Davis Landaverde, a 21-year-old Honduran man who was out looking for food for his 1 ½-year-old son when someone asked him if he wanted to work at a car wash. He didn’t hesitate and took it. He could earn 75 cents per car – so if he washes 10 cars a day, he’ll make more than Mexico’s minimum wage which is around $4.35 per day.

Since thousands of Central Americans marched into Mexico a few months ago, setting up temporary housing has become a problem. Officials recently closed the shelter near the border and relocated many of the migrants to another location deeper inland. Hundreds, though, refused to leave and have set up makeshift camps and tents. They've said it’s easier to find jobs nearby if they stay put.

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Migrants looking for longer-term jobs have gathered at a downtown location to begin paperwork for temporary visas in Mexico allowing them to work legally. Once they get their Mexican identification numbers, they can meet with recruiters for spots at assembly plants, where turnover is high and jobs are up for grabs.

In November, the Baja California state government even launched a month-long job fair, mostly for manufacturing positions along the border.

Francisco Iribe Paniagua, the state's labor secretary, told the Arizona Republic the idea for the job fair came after Haitian migrants swarmed the Tijuana area two years ago. When officials tried out a job fair program, many ended up staying and becoming productive residents in the city.

EIGHT-MONTH-OLD BOY PUSHED UNDER HOLE IN BORDER WALL

"They had also come with the purpose (of seeking asylum in the U.S.), but the reality on the ground forced many of them to stay in Baja California," he told the newspaper. "This time around we're acting more quickly, taking advantage of that experience."

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Attendance at a job fair set up to help the migrants find work has surged since a Nov. 25 march on the U.S. border devolved into chaos as some migrants rushed toward the border and U.S. agents responded by firing tear gas into Mexico. Before the march, only about 100 migrants were showing up each day, a number that has grown to 400 or more since.

HONDURAN WOMAN, 19, IN MIGRANT CARAVAN SCALES WALL TO GIVE BIRTH IN U.S.

U.S. officials announced Monday they will start withdrawing many of the active-duty troops that President Trump ordered to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to the caravan. About 2,200 of the active duty troops will be out before the holidays. The move by the Trump administration to beef up the military just before the midterm election was viewed by some as a political stunt and a waste of military resources.

Col. Rob Manning said there are currently 2,200 active-duty troops in Texas; 1,350 in Arizona; and 1,650 in California.

“Some units have completed their mission and they have already started to partially redeploy. Other units have been identified to rotate home and will be returning home over the next several weeks,” Manning said.

Fox News’ Travis Fedschun and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

You can find Barnini Chakraborty on Twitter @Barnini.

Dozens of faith leaders arrested at San Diego ‘Love Knows No Borders’ protest

SAN DIEGO – U.S. authorities Monday arrested 32 faith leaders marching in California toward the Mexican border during a protest organized by a Quaker group. One activist was charged with assaulting an officer and remains in custody.

More than 300 people, many the leaders of churches, mosques, synagogues and indigenous communities, took part in the demonstration at San Diego's Border Field State Park, which borders Tijuana, Mexico.

Activists have demanded the U.S. government pull the military from border communities, “respect” the human right to petition for asylum and end deportations of illegal immigrants. The group also is calling on Congress to defund Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Protection.

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The rally, held on a beach divided by the border wall, was the second confrontation for U.S. agents since a caravan of more than 6,000 migrants, predominantly Hondurans, reached Tijuana last month. A confrontation with rock-throwers from Mexico led to U.S. agents firing tear gas into Mexico on Nov. 25 and a five-hour closure at the world’s busiest border crossing.

On Monday, the agents were dressed in riot gear, waiting in front of the border wall.

Protesters detained near the border with Tijuana, Mexico, on Monday. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

“Step back behind the caution tape! That is where you can peacefully demonstrate,” agents announced to those who showed up to demand a more “humane” border.

“Let us give (migrants) the resources they need,” Rev. Pamela Anderson said. “We don’t need military. We need judges.”

Women detained during the protest. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

The Federal Protective Service arrested 31 people while Border Patrol arrested the demonstrator accused of assault.

Daniel Burns, a protestor who made the trip from Maine, told KGTV the agents were professional.

“I sat down when they started walking toward us… they were professional,” he said.

Members of various faith groups walking on the beach toward the U.S. border with Mexico. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The demonstration Monday was meant to launch a national week of action called "Love Knows No Borders: A Moral Call for Migrant Justice," which falls between Human Rights Day — on Monday — and International Migrants' Day on Dec. 18, the group said.

SOME MIGRANTS PUT ASYLUM PLANS ON HOLD, SEEK TEMP JOBS IN TIJUANA

"Showing up to welcome and bless children, mothers and fathers seeking asylum from very difficult and dehumanizing circumstances is the right and humane thing to do," said Bishop Minerva G. Carcano from the United Methodist Church. "How we act in these moments determines who we will become as a nation."

U.S. police and Border Patrol holding the line at the protest near the border. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Thousands of migrants are living in crowded tent cities in Tijuana after undertaking a grueling journey from Central America to the U.S. border. Many face waiting weeks or months in Mexico while they apply for asylum. The U.S. is processing up to about 100 claims a day at the San Diego crossing, which is creating a backlog.

Earlier Monday, U.S. officials announced Monday they will start withdrawing many of the active-duty troops that President Trump ordered to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to the caravan. About 2,200 of the active duty troops are set to leave before the holidays. The move by the Trump administration to beef up the military just before the midterm election was viewed by some critics as a political stunt and a waste of military resources.

Members of various faith groups showing support for Central American asylum-seekers who arrived in recent caravans. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

EIGHT-MONTH-OLD BOY PUSHED UNDER HOLE IN BORDER WALL

Col. Rob Manning said there are currently 2,200 active-duty troops in Texas; 1,350 in Arizona; and 1,650 in California.

“Some units have completed their mission and they have already started to partially redeploy. Other units have been identified to rotate home and will be returning home over the next several weeks,” Manning said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

You can find Barnini Chakraborty on Twitter @Barnini.

Eight-month-old boy pushed under hole in US-Mexico border wall as attempts to cross illegally prove perilous

SAN DIEGO – Eight-month-old Daniel Mendez was dressed in a gray hooded sweatshirt. The bottoms of his white-footed onesie were caked in dirt and grime and he was holding his bottle. He smiled at his father, Joel Mendez, one last time before being pushed under a crudely dug hole at the border wall separating Mexico and the United States.

Honduran migrant Mendez, 22, handed off baby Daniel to his 24-year-old girlfriend Yesenia Martinez, who had climbed under moments earlier, ready to cross onto American soil this past Friday. Mendez didn’t make the risky journey. He stayed behind in Tijuana to work because he said he feared immediate deportation if he'd crossed.

Cradling Daniel, Martinez surrendered to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents waiting for border crossers.

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Like Martinez, many Central American migrants — who are frustrated by the asylum process or say they feel unsafe because Mexicans are becoming more hostile towards them — have been taking matters into their own hands. At times, the results have been deadly.

On Wednesday night, an unidentified migrant and two others from El Salvador were spotted illegally entering the country about two miles west of the Gran Plaza Outlets near Calexico, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said.

Border Patrol agents arrested two men after they swam across the All-American Canal, which runs parallel to the Mexico-California border. The third man was struggling to stay afloat; the two others left him behind. A search-and-rescue team was unable to get to him because a freak storm that night triggered heavy rain and low visibility. His body was recovered the next morning.

Honduran migrant Joel Mendez, 22, feeding his eight-month-old son Daniel as his partner Yesenia Martinez, 24, crawled through the hole under the U.S. border wall. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

“This incident tragically illustrates how human smuggling organizations place migrants in perilous situations,” Chief Patrol Agent Gloria I. Chavez said. “This man put his trust in human smugglers and it cost him his life.”

U.S. inspectors at the main border crossing in San Diego are processing up to 100 asylum claims every day, but thousands still wait. And while the U.S. and Mexico have worked to make the journey into America seem less appealing, many in the caravan claim it’s still better than the realities they face at home, which include extreme violence and poverty. Most, upon crossing illegally, claim asylum.

In late November, a Honduran teenager who was 8 months pregnant scaled the border wall with her 3-year-old son and husband. Maryury Elizabeth Serrano-Hernandez and her family had traveled more than 2,000 miles.

Moments later, Martinez surrendered to waiting border guards while Mendez stayed behind in Tijuana to work, saying he feared he’d be deported if he crossed. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

She, too, claimed asylum after she crossed illegally and was taken to the Imperial Beach Station in San Diego County for processing. She started experiencing pain and went into labor early. Serrano-Hernandez was rushed to a hospital in San Diego where she gave birth and is believed to be the first member of the migrant caravan to have a child in the United States. Border Patrol told Fox News that members of her family “placed into immigration proceedings and released on their own recognizance on December 2.”

The controversy at the border – and the administration’s response to it – has polarized much of the country. Last month, images of federal agents firing tear gas on hundreds of migrants sparked some outrage with several high-ranking Democrats blaming the White House. Those complaints were tamped down after data from the Department of Homeland Security revealed that agents also used tear gas at the U.S.-Mexico border dozens of times during the Obama administration.

HONDURAN WOMAN, 19, IN MIGRANT CARAVAN SCALES BORDER WALL TO GIVE BIRTH

President Trump has vowed to stop migrants from entering the U.S. He’s ramped up rhetoric about the types of people seeking asylum and has claimed many in the caravan are hardened criminals and ready to wreak havoc. He’s also sent thousands of troops to patrol the border.

Yesenia Martinez, 24, carrying her eight-month-old son Daniel as she looked for a place to cross the U.S. border wall. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The border mission was supposed to come to an end on Dec. 15, but on Tuesday, Defense Secretary James Mattis extended the deployments of active duty troops into early 2019.

MIGRANT DROWNS IN CANAL AFTER ILLEGALLY CROSSING BORDER DURING STORM, OFFICIALS SAY

Currently, there are about 5,600 troops stationed in Texas, Arizona and California. Some troops in California have been helping Border Patrol place concertina wire and construct concrete barriers at border crossing points – something Mattis indicated two weeks ago was close to completion.

Fox News’ Katherine Lam and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

You can find Barnini Chakraborty on Twitter @Barnini.

San Diego non-profits running out of space for migrant caravan asylum seekers

SAN DIEGO, Calif. - A group of San Diego-based nonprofits claim they are running out of money and space to house, clothe and feed hundreds of asylum-seeking families ICE agents have been quietly transporting in and dumping onto the streets.

The San Diego Rapid Response Network (SDRRN), a coalition of human rights, service and faith-based organizations, is urging government officials to develop and implement “a sustainable plan to keep vulnerable asylum-seeking families off the streets and help them reach their final destination.”

The organization claims that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has released hundreds of migrants into San Diego – the largest land border crossing in the world.

The problem, SDRRN says, is that the recent influx is too much to handle.

“The shelter can accommodate only about 150 people, with average stays of 24 to 48 hours,” Edward Sifuentes, a spokesman for the ACLU of San Diego & Imperial Counties, said. “It stays filled to capacity because as quickly as one group of families moves on, others are released by immigration authorities.”

MIGRANT CARAVAN HURTS TOURISM IN TIJUANA: 'THEY'RE KIND OF SCARED'

Central American migrants planning to surrender to U.S. border guards climb over the U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, late Monday, Dec. 3. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Sifuentes warns that “the need for migrant shelter and related services is expected to escalate in coming weeks as hundreds gather in Tijuana hoping to claim asylum in the U.S.”

Once asylum seekers are processed, federal agents drop off them off at various shelters and Greyhound bus stations around the city at the person’s request.

Norma Chavez-Peterson, the executive director of the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties, said the network’s resources have been stretched to their thinnest point yet. The network is on their fifth shelter location in six weeks, and for the first time has had to turn families away due to capacity.

“We're at a moment of a lack of capacity, we cannot sustain this any longer,” Chavez-Peterson said. “We need a higher level of leadership.”

During a press conference at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in San Ysidro, Chavez-Peterson outlined what the network needs to continue to fill the gaps of care for asylum seekers. In a series of meetings with state and local government leaders, she has advocated for an infusion of cash and physical resources, along with a concrete plan of sustainability.

Specifically, she said the network needs a high-capacity facility that can house up to 200 people, along with the resources to hire staff, security, provide food, travel money, and cover some transportation costs for the asylum seekers. Most urgent among these is a secure, stable shelter.

Often, though, the migrants themselves have nowhere to go, Vino Panjanor, executive director of Catholic Charities at the Diocese of San Diego, told Fox News. If they by chance have a place to go, they typically have no way of getting there.

“These migrant families consist of small children as young as a 3-day old baby,” he said. “We don’t have resources. We are working on shoe-string budgets. This started on Oct. 26. It’s week 5. It’s not sustainable.”

Several other humanitarian groups echoed Panjanor’s sentiments and say they are running out of options.

HONDURAN WOMAN, 19, IN MIGRANT CARAVAN SCALES BORDER WALL TO GIVE BIRTH IN US AFTER 2,000-MILE TRIP

The San Diego Rapid Response Network claims that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has released hundreds of migrants into San Diego – the largest land border crossing in the world. The problem, SDRRN says, is that the recent influx is too much to handle. (San Diego Rapid Response Network)

“SDRRN’s efforts were intended as a stopgap measure, but the growing number of asylum-seeking families in need is surpassing the network’s collective ability to provide basic resources, including food, shelter, emergency healthcare and travel assistance,” the organization told Fox News in a written statement.

Since setting up an emergency shelter in November, SDRRN has helped more than 1,700 migrants released by federal immigration authorities. Those released have been initially processed by Homeland Security and are waiting for their scheduled ICE hearing which can be months away. Without a safe place to go, many wander the streets homeless and hungry.

“We have to take some to the ER for medical help,” Panjanor said. “This isn’t a political issue. We aren’t taking a political stand. It’s a humanitarian one.”

ICE told Fox News: “Family units that are released will be enrolled in a form of ICE’s Alternatives to Detention or released on another form of supervision.”

It added: “ICE continues to work with local and state officials and NGO partners in the area so they are prepared to provide assistance with transportation or other services.”

Not satisfied, SDRRN has reached out to local and state leaders pleading for help.

California’s Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom, a Democrat who frequently takes on the Trump administration over immigration issues, recently said the state government needs to step up and make a greater effort in supporting asylum seekers.

Since setting up an emergency shelter in November, SDRRN has helped more than 1,700 migrants released by federal immigration authorities. (San Diego Rapid Response Network)

“We’re all in this together,” he said. “I feel a deep sense of responsibility to address the issues that we as a border community face and I think we need to humanize this issue, not politicize the issue.”

For now, it seems that migrants are stuck in San Diego.

Many, though not all, have fled countries like Honduras after receiving death threats from brutal street thugs such as MS-13 and the 18th Street gang. Some are also running from corrupt government officials in their home countries that have made living there sheer hell.

The migrants are also having a tough time returning to Mexico. Residents there are fed up by thousands of Central American asylum seekers pushing their way onto Mexican soil. Some have circled encampments and shouted at migrants.

In one case, things got so bad that an 8-month pregnant woman, her husband and toddler son, scaled a portion of the border wall after feeling unsafe at a caravan stopping point near the Tijuana-San Diego border.

Late last month, Mexicans in Tijuana marched down the street with one clear message to the migrants: Get out!

“We want the caravan to go; they are invading us," Patricia Reyes, a 62-year-old protester, hiding from the sun under an umbrella, told NPR. "They should have come into Mexico correctly, legally, but they came in like animals."

Fox News’ Andrew Keiper contributed to this report.

You can find Barnini Chakraborty on Twitter @Barnini.

Migrant caravan hurts tourism in Tijuana: ‘They’re kind of scared’

TIJUANA, Mexico – Fears of a possible U.S.-Mexican border shutdown associated with the migrant caravan is keeping customers away from Tijuana businesses, according to merchants, tour guides and even dentists who cater to Americans.

“It's been kind of slow,” Giancarlo Marshall, who co-owns Nativo Coffee in Tijuana, told Fox News. “Around town, everybody was really nervous and didn't know what was going to happen."

One of Nativo Coffee's two locations is just steps from the San Ysidro border crossing. Much of its business comes from those who commute between San Diego and Tijuana. Marshall, who also has seen a slowdown with his rentals listed on Airbnb, said Nativo’s customers are mostly concerned with getting stuck on one side or the other.

"They're kind of scared,” Marshall said. "We're people that commute a lot to the U.S., and back and forth.”

On November 25, U.S. Customs and Border Protection temporarily suspended northbound and southbound crossings after agents deployed tear gas when some migrants tried to breach the fence and enter the U.S. illegally. But even before the incident, President Donald Trump indicated closures are a possibility.

On November 25, U.S. Customs and Border Protection temporarily suspended northbound and southbound crossings after agents deployed tear gas when some migrants tried to breach the fence and enter the U.S. illegally. But even before the incident, President Donald Trump indicated closures are a possibility. REUTERS/Kim Kyung

“If we find it gets to a level where we are going to lose control or where people are going to start getting hurt, we will close entry into the country for a period of time until we get it under control,” he told the press at his Mar-a-Lago resort on November 22.

"They still think that it's a little bit uncertain,” Marshall said.  “They don't want to take the risk of coming over and getting stuck.”

Marshall says unlike his neighbors, when the caravan first arrived, Nativo Coffee actually saw an uptick in traffic, thanks to visiting media. But as news coverage slowed down, that brief boost has also waned and Marshall said some of his regular customers have stopped showing up.

“[If] they close the border, it's kind of bad for everyone around,” Marshall said.

Businesses as well as medical and dental offices in Tijuana, which draw in Americans looking for cheaper care, have seen a slowdown in customer traffic. Companies in San Diego have also been impacted. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

Medical and dental offices in Tijuana, which draw in Americans looking for cheaper care, have also seen a slowdown in customer traffic.

“Some patients are saying, ‘let’s wait for the situation to cool down and we’ll set up another appointment later,’’ said Georgina Carabarin, a prosthodontist in Tijuana, told the Associated Press, which reported that 70 percent of her patients are San Diego-based.  “We’re hoping everything goes back to normal."

Companies on the San Diego side have also been impacted.

“What we’ve been experiencing is on par with the rest of the businesses across the border,” Derrik Chinn, owner of tourism company Turista Libre, told The San Diego Union-Tribune. “My concern is how long will it take for this ripple effect to subside.”

The former San Diego journalist who now gives tours told the paper he has lost about $4,000 to $5,000 worth of business and has had to cancel at least five of his tours, which “give visitors a way to experience Mexico like an insider,” according to the paper.

The majority of migrants who arrived with the caravan are now housed at a new shelter about nine miles from the border. The first shelter, which Tijuana officials closed, sits on the other side of a street that runs along a border wall.

Honduran, woman, 19, in migrant caravan scales border wall to give birth in US after 2,000-mile trip

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Maryury Elizabeth Serrano-Hernandez was more than seven months pregnant when she left Honduras.

At just 19-years-old, she and her husband Miguel Ortiz, along with their three-year-old son, traveled more than 2,000 miles in search of a better life.

Sometimes they walked. Other times they relied on rides from strangers or traveled on crowded trucks used to transport pigs. They slept in tents on sidewalks and washed up where they could.

Late last month, they finally made their way to Tijuana, Mexico, where thousands of other Central Americans had gathered, hoping to cross into the United States.

At the makeshift camp, Serrano-Hernandez and her husband say they feared for their safety after being surrounded by Mexicans who weren’t happy they were there. Scared and outnumbered, they decided to cross the border illegally.

CARAVAN MIGRANTS BEGIN TO BREACH BORDER AS FRUSTRATION WITH SLOW ASYLUM PROCESS GROWS

“With the faith in God, I always said my son will be born there (in America),” Serrano-Hernandez told Univision, which documented parts of their journey.

After somehow climbing the border wall, the young Honduran family were met by three border patrol agents who demanded they return to Tijuana. The family refused and asked for asylum. They were taken to the Imperial Beach Station in San Diego County for processing.

As the events were unfolding however, Serrano-Hernandez could tell something wasn’t quite right.

“The day I came across, I felt a little pain, but I thought it will be because of my nerves,” she said.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agency told Fox News: “The woman, who was eight months pregnant, began complaining of abdominal pain (Nov. 27) and was immediately transported to a local hospital by Border Patrol agents.”

Serrano-Hernandez was in labor. Soon thereafter, she gave birth to a baby boy.

CARAVAN ORGANIZER SAYS MOST MIGRANTS NOT BAD PEOPLE, TELLS TRUMP: 'LET THESE PEOPLE IN!'

But it wasn’t all roses and rainbows after that.

“I felt like a criminal,” Serrano-Hernandez said.

Her husband claims immigration officials, who stood guard outside the hospital room, closed all the windows and tried placing handcuffs on the new mother moments after giving birth. They also inspected food brought in by nurses and monitored people entering and exiting the room. The nurses held a drive and gifted the family clothes, diapers and baby wipes but Ortiz says once his family returned to the San Diego detention center, their property was confiscated.

Central American migrants walk along the U.S. border fence looking for places they might be able to cross, in Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 5.  (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Border Patrol did not respond to specific inquiries Fox News made about whether agents took the items, nor did they respond to requests seeking data on the number of pregnant women making similar attempts to give birth on U.S. soil.

Serrano-Hernandez is believed to be the first member of the migrant caravan to have a child after crossing the border to seek asylum.

Border Patrol did tell Fox News that the family was “placed into immigration proceedings and released on their own recognizance on December 2.”

MIGRANT CARAVAN SHELTER SHUT DOWN OVER 'BAD SANITARY CONDITIONS' AS HUNDREDS MOVE TO NEW FACILITY

The news comes after President Trump vowed to stop migrants from entering the U.S. He’s ramped up rhetoric about the types of people seeking asylum and claims many in the caravan are hardened criminals and ready to wreak havoc. He’s also sent thousands of troops to patrol the border.

The border mission was supposed to come to an end on Dec. 15, but on Tuesday, Defense Secretary James Mattis extended the deployments of active duty troops into early 2019.

Currently, there are about 5,600 troops stationed in Texas, Arizona and California. Some troops in California have been helping Border Patrol place concertina wire and construct concrete barriers at border crossing points – something Mattis indicated last week was close to completion.

The controversy at the border – and the administration’s response to it – has polarized much of the country. Last month, images of federal agents firing tear gas on hundreds of migrants created outrage with several high-ranking Democrats blaming the White House. Those complaints were tamped down after data from the Department of Homeland Security revealed that agents also used tear gas at the U.S.-Mexico border dozens of times during the Obama administration.

You can find Barnini Chakraborty on Twitter @Barnini.

Caravan migrants begin to breach border as frustration with slow asylum process grows

At least two dozen Central American migrants– disillusioned and frustrated with the asylum-seeking process– breached the U.S.-Mexico border on Monday just before dusk by scaling a 10-foot metal fence, Reuters reported.

Other migrants managed to squeeze through the fence on the beach.

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Karen Mayeni, a 29-year-old Honduran mother with three children aged between six and 12, told Reuters that she’s only observing others penetrating the border and “waiting to see what happens.” The woman will decide her family's next action “in a couple of days,” she said.

TIJUANA MAYOR SAYS ARREST CARAVAN ORGANIZER, VOWS TO STOP FUNDING MIGRANTS

About 90 minutes later, she and her children were seen on the U.S. side of the border, the outlet reported.

Some migrants reportedly tried to escape the capture by the U.S. Border Patrol, but most were caught. It remains unclear how many migrants managed to escape the detention.

The migrants are part of the caravan that traveled towards the U.S. in an effort to enter the U.S. – some illegally, others legally in the hope of applying for asylum – citing issues such as rampant violence in their home countries.

But the plans were curbed by the Trump administration’s decision to send troops to protect the border from illegal entry and impose a new policy that requires every migrant seeking asylum to remain in Mexico where their case will be heard. The rule was struck down last month by a federal judge.

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Thousands of migrants are currently residing in Tijuana, a Mexican border city, that’s increasingly warning about the crisis caused by the sudden influx of the migrants.

Mayor Juan Manuel Gastélum told Fox News that his city cannot continue providing support for the migrants, saying already-stretched city resources were emptied since the crisis began.

“In those six hours that the border was closed, we lost approximately 129 million pesos,” he said, referring to recent clashes at the border. “That's not fair. How do you think people from Tijuana feel towards those people who are making problems?”

ONE-THIRD OF MIGRANTS IN CARAVAN ARE BEING TREATED FOR HEALTH ISSUES, TIJUANA HEALTH OFFICIAL SAYS

Migrants residing in Tijuana are also suffering and are exposed to health problems, its Health Department said last week.

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The spokesman told Fox News that out of 6,000 migrants currently residing in the city, over a third of them (2,267) are being treated for health-related issues.

There are three confirmed cases of tuberculosis, four cases of HIV/AIDS and four separate cases of chickenpox, the spokesman said.

At least 101 migrants have lice and multiple instances of skin infections, the department’s data shows.

There’s also a threat of Hepatitis outbreak due to unsanitary conditions, the spokesman said. The thousands of migrants are currently being sheltered at a former concert venue. They previously were residing at the Benito Juarez Sports Complex near the San Ysidro U.S.-Mexico Port of Entry until this past weekend, when that camp was shut down over "bad sanitary conditions."

Fox News’ Griff Jenkins contributed to this report.

Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @LukasMikelionis.

Migrant caravan shelter shut down over ‘bad sanitary conditions’ as hundreds move to new facility

Mexican authorities shut down a crowded, unsanitary and mud-filled shelter at a sports complex, moving the remaining migrants who want to enter the U.S. to a new, government-run facility that's further from the border.

Thousands of Central American migrants, mostly Hondurans, have joined caravans in recent weeks in an effort to speed across Mexico to request refuge at the border with America, provoking the ire of President Trump, who frequently urged Mexico to keep them away from the border and previously ordered thousands of U.S. troops to the area.

Officials in Tijuana cited "bad sanitary conditions" as the reason for closing the sports complex shelter. Mud, lice and respiratory infections were rampant in the space that holds up to 6,000 people, officials said, while many areas were filled with trash.

“It’s a much better place, and all of the help and government services will be there,” Edgar Corzo Sosa, a spokesman for Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission, told the Washington Post of the new space.

A woman rests inside a tent on the street near a sports complex shelter as authorities tried to persuade migrants to move to a new, more distant shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Still, some of the migrants were reportedly wary of the Mexican government's efforts.

“People are distrustful that it’s an immigration trick, that it’s not what they say it is and that they will really be deported,” Amelia Frank-Vitale, a doctoral candidate in anthropology at the University of Michigan and an immigration expert who has traveled with migrant caravans for years, told the Washington Post. “It’s happened before in southern Mexico.”

Tijuana's Mayor Juan Manuel Gastélum previously called the migrant caravan a “humanitarian crisis,” telling Fox News that he needed federal assistance to help fund shelter for the migrants.

“I’m not going to break public services to solve this problem,” the Tijuana mayor said.

Marlen Gallegos, 48, told the Post that she was initially worried by rumors floating around the sports complex that anyone who went to the new shelter would eventually be deported.

She later learned that was not true.

“It’s as they said it would be,” said Gallegos, who is from Honduras and planned to wait on her application for U.S. asylum from the new camp. “I’ll look for some work around here in the meantime.”

A migrant helps bundle and clear trash as most Central Americans leave a sports complex shelter that authorities were trying to close, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

On Saturday, in one of his first acts in office, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador signed an agreement with his counterparts from three Central American countries to establish a development plan to stem the flow of migrants seeking asylum in the U.S.

Meanwhile, a U.S. judge on Friday refused to immediately allow the Trump administration to enforce a ban on asylum for any immigrants who illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border.

Judge Jon Tigar rejected the Justice Department's request to suspend his earlier order temporarily blocking the ban. The administration had still not shown that the ban was legal, or that any harm would come from continuing to implement existing immigration laws, Tigar said in his order.

A migrant greets people while being transferred via a bus to a new shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

At issue is President Trump's Nov. 9 proclamation that barred anyone who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border between official ports of entry from seeking asylum. Trump issued the proclamation in response to caravans of migrants approaching the border.

The Trump administration has indicated that it will appeal Tigar's ruling.

Fox News' Griff Jenkins and the Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Christopher Carbone covers technology and science for Fox News Digital. Tips or story leads: christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow @christocarbone.