American student stabbed to death in Netherlands told friend her roommate threatened to kill 3 people

A Minnesota blues drummer studying psychology who was stabbed to death in her apartment in the Netherlands had texted a friend last week, saying her roommate threatened to kill three people. Sarah Papenheim of Minnesota was discovered Wednesday stabbed to death in a Rotterdam apartment near Erasmus University, where she’d been studying since 2016, police spokeswoman … Continue reading “American student stabbed to death in Netherlands told friend her roommate threatened to kill 3 people”

A Minnesota blues drummer studying psychology who was stabbed to death in her apartment in the Netherlands had texted a friend last week, saying her roommate threatened to kill three people.

Sarah Papenheim of Minnesota was discovered Wednesday stabbed to death in a Rotterdam apartment near Erasmus University, where she’d been studying since 2016, police spokeswoman Miriam Boers said. A 23-year-old man has been arrested in her slaying, though his identity has not been released. On Friday, he was ordered detained for two more weeks while the investigation continues.

Adam Pryor [left] said his friend Sarah Papenheim [right] texted him that her roommate wanted to kill three people. ( Adam Pryor via AP)

The 21-year-old woman’s friend, Adam Pryor, said he received a text message from Papenheim on Dec. 6, saying her roommate threatened to kill three people. In the messages, Papenheim said she was going to have to go to the police, The Associated Press reported. Pryor said he was not sure if she went to the police.

AMERICAN STUDENT LIVING IN THE NETHERLANDS STABBED TO DEATH IN APARTMENT, POLICE SAY

He told “Good Morning America” he felt something was wrong with her before she died.

Sarah Papenheim, an American psychology student who was fatally stabbed in her apartment in the Netherlands, had texted a friend saying her roommate threatened to kill three people.  (Facebook)

"I could tell she wasn't doing alright because she was just being weird over text and then I asked her what's wrong and she said she never talks to anyone anymore," Pryor said." "[She said], 'I work full time and I have school full time and everything is just so f—-d up right now. My roommate told me is going to kill three people so I'm gonna to have to go to the police.’”

He called his friend “one of a kind.”

"It was just incredible. We talked just all the time over there, through text and whatnot, in and out of school for both of us. It's just — she's one of a kind,” he said.

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Donee Odegard, Papenheim's mom, told the Star Tribune the man accused of murdering her daughter had been “getting more and more angry” over the last few weeks.

“They'd talk music all night,” Odegard said. “They kinda clicked on that. Then as time went on, he'd get highs and lows.”

Fox News’ Ryan Gaydos and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com. You can follow her at @Kathleen_Joyce8 on Twitter.

Ex-Minneapolis cop ‘intended’ to kill Australian woman, prosecutors say as they seek new charge

A former Minneapolis police officer “intended” to kill Justine Ruszczyk Damond when he shot the Australian woman multiple times last year, prosecutors argued as they seek to charge the cop with a more serious murder count.

Prosecutors said Thursday they are seeking to charge Mohamed Noor with intentional second-degree murder in the death of Damond, who the officer shot and killed in July 2017 after the 40-year-old woman called 911 to report a possible sexual assault in the alley behind her home.

"A person acts with the intent to kill not just when they have the purpose of causing death, but also when they believe that their act, if successful, will result in death," prosecutors wrote in a court filing. "As a trained police officer, the defendant was fully aware that such a shot would kill Ms. Ruszczyk, a result he clearly intended.”

Authorities prosecuting Mohamed Noor who shot and killed Justine Ruszczyk Damond, an Australian woman, in July 2017, are seeking to add a more serious charge to his case. (AP)

Noor already faces third-degree murder and manslaughter charges in the slaying. Prosecutors cited new evidence in seeking upgraded charges against Noor.

Peter Wold, one of Noor's attorneys, said he hasn't seen any new evidence since Noor was initially charged. When asked if an additional count would postpone trial, he said he doubted it, adding: "We're ready."

Prosecutors wrote in their filing that it will be up to a jury to weigh which degree of homicide, if any, is proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

Damond’s death made international headlines last year that led to major changes in the Minneapolis Police Department, especially with the use of body cameras. Damond, a life coach and dual Australian-U.S. citizen, was engaged to be married at the time of her death.

Her father, John Ruszczyk, filed a $50 million civil rights lawsuit against Noor, the city and others.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Katherine Lam is a breaking and trending news digital producer for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter at @bykatherinelam

Iranian accused of procuring parts for IEDs used on US troops; $3M reward offered for capture

U.S. authorities this week announced a $3 million reward for the capture of an Iranian man accused of procuring parts from a Minnesota company later used to make roadside bombs targeting U.S. military forces in Iraq.

Hossein Ahmad Larijani went on the run after a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicted him in 2010 on charges related to the shipment of 6,000 radio transceiver modules made in the state, an FBI news release states.

The reward is being offered by the State Department.

According to the release, Larijani, 55, was assisted by companies in Iran and Singapore, along with four co-conspirators in Singapore, from 2007-08 in transporting the modules from the Minnesota company –referred to in court documents as Company A – to Iran.

Singapore-based Corezing International deceived the firm into shipping the devices to Singapore by telling it the components would be used in a local telecommunications project, the FBI said.

Once the shipments arrived in Singapore, they were allegedly shipped illegally to Iran and used to make remote detonation systems for improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The modules could transmit data from up to 40 miles away and were outfitted with encryption capabilities, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

“In addition to commercial uses, these same modules have other lethal and destructive applications,” the indictment said.

According to the indictment, between 2008 and 2009, U.S. and coalition forces retrieved numerous remote detonation systems in Iraq assembled using modules shipped from Minnesota.

Three of Larijani's co-conspirators were extradited to the U.S. where they served prison terms before being deported back to Singapore. One remains at large in Singapore, the FBI said.

The FBI believes Larijani is living in Tehran and poses an international flight risk.

Crackdown on snow-shoveling scofflaws reveals that scolding Dem is one of them: report

A Minneapolis city official who backed a get-tough approach on residents who don't shovel snow from their sidewalks was herself the subject of seven complaints last winter and was issued a fine of $149 at a home she owns, according to a report.

City Council President Lisa Bender, a member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor party who owns the home in the Wedge neighborhood with her husband, told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that she didn't know what condition her sidewalk was in when the complaints were made or why her family wasn't able to clear the snow on time.

“We’ve owned our house for ten years. We’re a family of two working parents with two small children, and we do our very best to shovel our sidewalk at all times,” Bender said.

The city sent out letters earlier this month reminding residents of the requirement to shovel their sidewalks after snowstorms, the paper reported.

Bender said she supports a stricter approach so that sidewalks remain clear this winter, according to the report.

“If there are times when we haven’t gotten to it, then that’s why the city’s enforcement mechanism is there,” she said. “I should be treated like every other property owner in the city.”

City inspectors will be more proactive this winter in searching for unshoveled sidewalks and issuing notices of violations, the report said.

Click here for more from the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Iranian accused of procuring parts for IEDs used on US troops; $3M reward offered for capture

U.S. authorities this week announced a $3 million reward for the capture of an Iranian man accused of procuring parts from a Minnesota company later used to make roadside bombs targeting U.S. military forces in Iraq.

Hossein Ahmad Larijani went on the run after a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicted him in 2010 on charges related to the shipment of 6,000 radio transceiver modules made in the state, an FBI news release states.

The reward is being offered by the State Department.

According to the release, Larijani, 55, was assisted by companies in Iran and Singapore, along with four co-conspirators in Singapore, from 2007-08 in transporting the modules from the Minnesota company –referred to in court documents as Company A – to Iran.

Singapore-based Corezing International deceived the firm into shipping the devices to Singapore by telling it the components would be used in a local telecommunications project, the FBI said.

Once the shipments arrived in Singapore, they were allegedly shipped illegally to Iran and used to make remote detonation systems for improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The modules could transmit data from up to 40 miles away and were outfitted with encryption capabilities, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

“In addition to commercial uses, these same modules have other lethal and destructive applications,” the indictment said.

According to the indictment, between 2008 and 2009, U.S. and coalition forces retrieved numerous remote detonation systems in Iraq assembled using modules shipped from Minnesota.

Three of Larijani's co-conspirators were extradited to the U.S. where they served prison terms before being deported back to Singapore. One remains at large in Singapore, the FBI said.

The FBI believes Larijani is living in Tehran and poses an international flight risk.

Minnesota mom, 25, charged with giving 9-month-old son laxatives to inflict starvation

A 25-year-old mom in Minnesota was charged last week with one count of felony-level child endangerment that could result in substantial harm or death, after authorities discovered she allegedly gave her 9-month-old son laxatives to inflict starvation.

Authorities discovered that Megan Lee Kafer of Lewiston, Minn., who is scheduled to appear in court on the charge in mid-December, had searched the web on her phone for ways to poison a baby, including: “MiraLax overdose,” “Can a doctor tell if you overdose on MiraLax,” “How to make a baby really sick,” “Mom gets 20 years to life for poisoning son with salt,” “Salt child death,” and “How to make a baby vomit,” according to court documents via the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office.

Kafer’s husband, Jacob Kafer, didn’t return Fox News’ request for comment.

“I am not saying there wasn’t an issue, there definitely was … I just don’t think it’s (Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome),” Jacob Kafer told the Twin Cities Pioneer Press. “My wife was definitely not in a proper mental state, but to the extreme that they make it out to be and have laid out in the complaint, it’s not quite like that.”

The woman's parental rights have been terminated, according to officials.

“We are trying to get the family back together in a way that is safe and healthy for everyone,” he added.

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The Pioneer Press reported that Kafer’s son was hospitalized in the middle of July for “failure to thrive.”

Hospital officials said they suspected foul play when the baby continued to be “emaciated,” despite doctors’ “inexplicably ineffective” efforts to help the boy gain weight.

Court documents said medical staff monitored the mom interacting with her baby at the hospital through a hidden surveillance camera at the end of July. Investigators said the camera captured Kafer inject a substance into her son’s feeding tube with a syringe.

EL CHAPO'S LAVISH, JET-SETTING LIFESTYLE REVEALED IN COURT

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension determined that the substance was MiraLax.

The child underwent “numerous procedures and surgeries” because of the mom’s misconduct, court documents said.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Iranian accused of procuring parts for IEDs used on US troops; $3M reward offered for capture

U.S. authorities this week announced a $3 million reward for the capture of an Iranian man accused of procuring parts from a Minnesota company later used to make roadside bombs targeting U.S. military forces in Iraq.

Hossein Ahmad Larijani went on the run after a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicted him in 2010 on charges related to the shipment of 6,000 radio transceiver modules made in the state, an FBI news release states.

The reward is being offered by the State Department.

According to the release, Larijani, 55, was assisted by companies in Iran and Singapore, along with four co-conspirators in Singapore, from 2007-08 in transporting the modules from the Minnesota company –referred to in court documents as Company A – to Iran.

Singapore-based Corezing International deceived the firm into shipping the devices to Singapore by telling it the components would be used in a local telecommunications project, the FBI said.

Once the shipments arrived in Singapore, they were allegedly shipped illegally to Iran and used to make remote detonation systems for improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The modules could transmit data from up to 40 miles away and were outfitted with encryption capabilities, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

“In addition to commercial uses, these same modules have other lethal and destructive applications,” the indictment said.

According to the indictment, between 2008 and 2009, U.S. and coalition forces retrieved numerous remote detonation systems in Iraq assembled using modules shipped from Minnesota.

Three of Larijani's co-conspirators were extradited to the U.S. where they served prison terms before being deported back to Singapore. One remains at large in Singapore, the FBI said.

The FBI believes Larijani is living in Tehran and poses an international flight risk.