Oregon inmate’s flu-related death leads family to sue state for $7.5M

A family is suing the state of Oregon for $7.5 million after their relative, 53-year-old Tina Ferri, an inmate at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, died of complications related to the flu because she reportedly did not receive a preventive vaccine. A lawsuit filed Monday in Washington County Circuit Court and reviewed by The Oregonian … Continue reading “Oregon inmate’s flu-related death leads family to sue state for $7.5M”

A family is suing the state of Oregon for $7.5 million after their relative, 53-year-old Tina Ferri, an inmate at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, died of complications related to the flu because she reportedly did not receive a preventive vaccine.

A lawsuit filed Monday in Washington County Circuit Court and reviewed by The Oregonian states Ferri died on Jan. 15 after a flu outbreak hit the women’s prison.

SHOULD YOU GET THE FLU SHOT? WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT THE 2018-19 FLU SEASON

While the facility had purchased the vaccine to administer to its tenants, it reportedly didn’t purchase a sufficient amount — only enough for 519 out of the 1,645 inmates housed at the facility, the lawsuit said, according to the newspaper.

A lawyer representing Ferri’s estate, Michael Fuller, told The Oregonian that the prison only used 300 of the 519 vaccines and claimed they were only distributed after some of the inmates fell ill.

Ferri contracted the flu and was subsequently quarantined in her cell, the lawsuit reportedly stated. At one point, Ferri allegedly began to cough up blood and was later transported by ambulance to a local hospital.

There, the 53-year-old was shackled to her hospital bed and was supervised by armed guards, the suit said, according to The Oregonian.

She died just hours after she arrived at the hospital.

The lawsuit, citing hospital records, claimed her death was “set in motion due to an Influenza A infection with staph superinfection.” Her cause of death was organ failure, the hospital records reportedly said.

Ferri’s death came just months after she began serving a six-year sentence for her involvement in an impaired driving crash, according to The Oregonian.

While the vaccine for last year’s flu season was about 40 percent effective, Fuller told the publication Ferri ’s death could have been better prevented if “most if not all” of the inmates at the facility had been vaccinated. The vaccine could have limited her exposure to the virus, he argued.

MONTANA 6-YEAR-OLD IS STATE'S FIRST FLU DEATH OF SEASON, FAMILY SAYS

Additionally, “a government report from the Federal Bureau of Prisons will state that at a minimum, prisons must always tell each inmate about the availability of flu shots, and must always tell each inmate when they may receive a flu shot through handbooks, fliers, electronic messages, and other announcements,” the suit stated, according to The Oregonian. But despite the alleged policy, some inmates at the facility testified that they were not informed about their access to the vaccine.

Jennifer Black, an Oregon Department of Corrections spokeswoman, declined to comment on the lawsuit when contacted by The Oregonian, citing the pending litigation. Black did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment on Thursday.

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.

Former inmate claims he was injured in shower; suing county jail for $905G

A former inmate, who claims he slipped and tore his rectum in the shower of a county jail in Oregon, is now suing the county for $905,000.

In the lawsuit, plaintiff Christopher Troy Depue, 36, alleges negligence on the part of Multnomah County Detention Center. He claims employees failed to give him a bath mat or "any equipment to aid him in showering" on Nov. 22, 2016, the filing says.

Deputies had escorted him to the shower to wash himself because he arrived at the jail with dog feces on his pants, the lawsuit said.

The county is responsible for the safety of the showers and well-being of individuals at the jail, the suit says.

The suit alleges that as a result of the "unsafe conditions," Depue suffered physical injuries, including pain, bruising, tearing, burning sensations, as well as "fear and embarrassment."

Jessica Morkert-Shibley, a county spokeswoman, declined to comment, citing the pending litigation, the Oregonian reported.

Depue is seeking $5,000 in economic damages and $900,000 for pain and suffering.

The suit was filed last month in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

It was unclear when the inmate was released from the jail.

Amy Lieu is a news editor and reporter for Fox News.

Sudden death of baby elephant leaves Oregon Zoo staff heartbroken

The Oregon Zoo in Portland was closed Friday following the unexpected death Thursday night of Lily, a 6-year-old Asian elephant who was considered "the darling of the zoo," according to the park's director.

Lily, the youngest member of the zoo's elephant family, had been diagnosed Wednesday with an active strain of endotheliotropic herpesvirus, but didn't immediately show any symptoms, the zoo said in a statement, the Oregonian reported.

When she was lethargic and uninterested in food on Thursday morning, vets treated her with fluids, medication and a transfusion, but to no avail. Lily succumbed to the viral infection late Thursday night — one day before her sixth birthday, the paper reported.

"I can't imagine a more devastating loss for this zoo family and our community," zoo director Don Moore said in a statement obtained by the Oregonian. "Lily was the darling of the zoo. She was loved by everyone from her elephant family to the people who cared for her every day to her thousands of fans.”

"I can’t imagine a more devastating loss for this zoo family and our community. Lily was the darling of the zoo. She was loved by everyone from her elephant family to the people who cared for her every day to her thousands of fans.”

— Don Moore, director, Oregon Zoo

Her mother Rose-Tu and people who cared for her since birth surrounded Lily when she passed, a statement on the zoo's Facebook said.

"Veterinary and care staff did all they could to save her, and Lily fought hard to the end," the statement said. "Lily brought joy to everyone she encountered. This is a heartbreaking loss for the herd and our entire community.

The Oregon Zoo was closed all of Friday, including for the scheduled evening ZooLights. It was to reopen Saturday, Fox 12 Oregon reported.

Amy Lieu is a news editor and reporter for Fox News.

Voters faced with hundreds of state referendums across the country

For many Americans, Election Day will involve more than just voting for representatives in Congress. Some 38 states this November will offer some form of direct democracy — generally speaking, the initiative and referendum system, under which citizens can vote for a specific rule, if enough registered voters have signed petitions to put the question on the ballot.

The idea has actually been around from the beginning — Georgia's constitution in 1777 allowed for initiatives. The modern initiative and referendum system began in Oregon in 1902, and has since been adopted, in one fashion or another, by numerous states.

Video

As common as it is, many are concerned about the system, feeling that citizens' votes are, in essence, being bought by the wealthy. One such citizen is David Trahan, a political activist and former state legislator in Maine. Formerly, he supported dozens of measures on the Maine ballot, but he has now changed his mind about referendums. He says he's seen how the money flows, and doesn't like it.

"They pour their money into a little state like Maine and these billionaires can buy a law," Trahen said. He believes outside groups with money deform a system that's supposed to be the direct voice of the people.

Good or bad, there's no denying a lot of hot button issues are being determined by initiative. For instance, this November:

Alabama, Oregon and West Virginia will vote on abortion rights.Idaho, Nebraska and Utah will vote on health care policies.Colorado, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Utah will vote on gerrymandering rules.

Other issues in which the voters will have their say include tax policy and energy policy. All in all, there will be over 160 ballot measures considered by various states.

Video

But, if people like Trahan are concerned the system has been hijacked by money, others see it as part of the rough and tumble of politics, not to mention a chance for the public to be heard.

There's Paul Jacob, for instance, who's a long-time supporter of the ballot measure process. He's worked on over 100 initiative and referendum campaigns across the country. As he puts it, "what better way …than to let the people vote directly on the issues at hand?"

CLICK FOR COMPLETE FOX NEWS MIDTERMS COVERAGE

Jacob admits money — sometimes outside money — comes into play, but adds that money is already part of politics, so better to give the power to the people and not just the politicians.

For Trahan, this won't do.

"Direct democracy," he maintains, "is Maine people passing laws that govern Maine people."

CRUZ COULD SEE MIDTERM BOOST FROM STRAIGHT-TICKET VOTING

Jacob believes that "people who don't like direct democracy don't want the people to be in charge."

Steve Kurtz is a producer for the Fox News Channel, and author of “Steve’s America (the perfect gift for people named Steve)”.

Voters faced with hundreds of state referendums across the country

For many Americans, Election Day will involve more than just voting for representatives in Congress. Some 38 states this November will offer some form of direct democracy — generally speaking, the initiative and referendum system, under which citizens can vote for a specific rule, if enough registered voters have signed petitions to put the question on the ballot.

The idea has actually been around from the beginning — Georgia's constitution in 1777 allowed for initiatives. The modern initiative and referendum system began in Oregon in 1902, and has since been adopted, in one fashion or another, by numerous states.

Video

As common as it is, many are concerned about the system, feeling that citizens' votes are, in essence, being bought by the wealthy. One such citizen is David Trahan, a political activist and former state legislator in Maine. Formerly, he supported dozens of measures on the Maine ballot, but he has now changed his mind about referendums. He says he's seen how the money flows, and doesn't like it.

"They pour their money into a little state like Maine and these billionaires can buy a law," Trahen said. He believes outside groups with money deform a system that's supposed to be the direct voice of the people.

Good or bad, there's no denying a lot of hot button issues are being determined by initiative. For instance, this November:

Alabama, Oregon and West Virginia will vote on abortion rights.Idaho, Nebraska and Utah will vote on health care policies.Colorado, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Utah will vote on gerrymandering rules.

Other issues in which the voters will have their say include tax policy and energy policy. All in all, there will be over 160 ballot measures considered by various states.

Video

But, if people like Trahan are concerned the system has been hijacked by money, others see it as part of the rough and tumble of politics, not to mention a chance for the public to be heard.

There's Paul Jacob, for instance, who's a long-time supporter of the ballot measure process. He's worked on over 100 initiative and referendum campaigns across the country. As he puts it, "what better way …than to let the people vote directly on the issues at hand?"

CLICK FOR COMPLETE FOX NEWS MIDTERMS COVERAGE

Jacob admits money — sometimes outside money — comes into play, but adds that money is already part of politics, so better to give the power to the people and not just the politicians.

For Trahan, this won't do.

"Direct democracy," he maintains, "is Maine people passing laws that govern Maine people."

CRUZ COULD SEE MIDTERM BOOST FROM STRAIGHT-TICKET VOTING

Jacob believes that "people who don't like direct democracy don't want the people to be in charge."

Steve Kurtz is a producer for the Fox News Channel, and author of “Steve’s America (the perfect gift for people named Steve)”.

Oregon woman busted with meth, handgun, throwing star

An Oregon woman is behind bars after she was busted with a large amount of meth, a handgun, a knife, and a throwing star, officials said.

Kathelina Test, 22, was pulled over at around 9 p.m. Saturday in Aloha after she was seen leaving a “known drug house,” the Washington County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

“In addition to a large quantity of methamphetamine, Ms. Test was in possession of a handgun and restricted weapons,” officials said.

A photo shared on the sheriff’s office social media pages showed Test had with her a plastic bag that appears to contain drugs, a large knife, a handgun, a cell phone, an undisclosed amount of money and a throwing star.

According to KOIN, there were four other people in the vehicle with Test.

Three others – Daniel Marcum, 22, Anthoney Smith, 33, and Patrick Darnielle, 28 – were also arrested.

Daniel Marcum, 22, Anthoney Smith, 33, and Patrick Darnielle, 28 were also arrested. (Washington County Sheriff’s Office)

Test was charged with delivering meth, being a felon with a gun, being a felon with restricted weapons, and a warrant for parole violation.

The other three men were given a variety of charges including heroin possession and parole violations. They are currently being held in the Washington County Jail.

Lucia I. Suarez Sang is a Reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

Voters faced with hundreds of state referendums across the country

For many Americans, Election Day will involve more than just voting for representatives in Congress. Some 38 states this November will offer some form of direct democracy — generally speaking, the initiative and referendum system, under which citizens can vote for a specific rule, if enough registered voters have signed petitions to put the question on the ballot.

The idea has actually been around from the beginning — Georgia's constitution in 1777 allowed for initiatives. The modern initiative and referendum system began in Oregon in 1902, and has since been adopted, in one fashion or another, by numerous states.

Video

As common as it is, many are concerned about the system, feeling that citizens' votes are, in essence, being bought by the wealthy. One such citizen is David Trahan, a political activist and former state legislator in Maine. Formerly, he supported dozens of measures on the Maine ballot, but he has now changed his mind about referendums. He says he's seen how the money flows, and doesn't like it.

"They pour their money into a little state like Maine and these billionaires can buy a law," Trahen said. He believes outside groups with money deform a system that's supposed to be the direct voice of the people.

Good or bad, there's no denying a lot of hot button issues are being determined by initiative. For instance, this November:

Alabama, Oregon and West Virginia will vote on abortion rights.Idaho, Nebraska and Utah will vote on health care policies.Colorado, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Utah will vote on gerrymandering rules.

Other issues in which the voters will have their say include tax policy and energy policy. All in all, there will be over 160 ballot measures considered by various states.

Video

But, if people like Trahan are concerned the system has been hijacked by money, others see it as part of the rough and tumble of politics, not to mention a chance for the public to be heard.

There's Paul Jacob, for instance, who's a long-time supporter of the ballot measure process. He's worked on over 100 initiative and referendum campaigns across the country. As he puts it, "what better way …than to let the people vote directly on the issues at hand?"

CLICK FOR COMPLETE FOX NEWS MIDTERMS COVERAGE

Jacob admits money — sometimes outside money — comes into play, but adds that money is already part of politics, so better to give the power to the people and not just the politicians.

For Trahan, this won't do.

"Direct democracy," he maintains, "is Maine people passing laws that govern Maine people."

CRUZ COULD SEE MIDTERM BOOST FROM STRAIGHT-TICKET VOTING

Jacob believes that "people who don't like direct democracy don't want the people to be in charge."

Steve Kurtz is a producer for the Fox News Channel, and author of “Steve’s America (the perfect gift for people named Steve)”.