Media use coverage of Bush funeral to criticize Trump

Many journalists used their reporting and commentary on the death of President George H.W. Bush as an opportunity to attack President Trump. Columbia Journalism Review’s daily newsletter stated: “In Bush’s case, that coverage has been dominated by favorable comparisons to President Trump.” That was an understatement. CNN turned to reliably liberal Patti Davis, President Reagan’s … Continue reading “Media use coverage of Bush funeral to criticize Trump”

Many journalists used their reporting and commentary on the death of President George H.W. Bush as an opportunity to attack President Trump. Columbia Journalism Review’s daily newsletter stated: “In Bush’s case, that coverage has been dominated by favorable comparisons to President Trump.”

That was an understatement.

CNN turned to reliably liberal Patti Davis, President Reagan’s daughter, to criticize President Trump. She predictably complained about “the loss of dignity associated with the presidency under President Trump.” CBS reported the pivotal news that “the Trumps and Clintons did not shake hands.”

Please stop the presses.

ABC decided to turn the coverage of President Bush’s death into a depraved liberal fantasy and tried to envision what Trump’s funeral would be like. "It will be the best presidential funeral ever. No one will ever have seen anything like that funeral," ABC News correspondent Terry Moran said, mocking President Trump.

NBC News Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent Andrea Mitchell said it was “extraordinary” seeing President Trump “sitting with the former presidents paying tribute to a leader whose humility and decency is different from today's politics.”

Journalists all wanted in on the action. The Washington Post needled Trump for not reciting a prayer and used it as a chance to make fun of the “faith and values of Trump.” The story included a 46-word attack sentence that said “many religious conservatives embraced him, despite what critics say is his dishonesty, philandering, crudeness and policies many see as anti-Christian.”

The Post also made fun of the president for using a limousine to go a short distance to visit the Bush family, though the article later noted the Obamas did the same thing for security reasons. Still we got this gem: “President Trump traveled 250 yards to greet George W. Bush. He used a stretch limo and an eight-vehicle motorcade to make the trip.”

Neutral journalism.

After the funeral, CNN waited just six minutes and 34 seconds to return to its regularly scheduled anti-Trump barrage. And CNN Senior Political Analyst John Avlon didn’t even give Trump credit for keeping a low profile during the event. "I don't think you want to give out too many medals for not screwing up a presidential funeral. The president was on best behavior this week, but that's a fairly low bar," Avlon said.

In one notable exchange, CNN anchors Chris Cuomo and Don Lemon were debating how President Obama should have reacted when President Trump tried to shake his hand.

Lemon, ever taking the low road, told viewers: “I don't think I would shake hands with him. I don't know. I would just … nope, couldn't do it. I'm not that big a person.” Lemon even re-enacted how he would have dissed the president.

Amazingly, Cuomo shamed him, saying it was all about "Me, me, I, I." He concluded: “You're petty and small.”

It was an impressive moment.

2. They also attacked Bush 41: Many journalists didn’t react with the same class that Cuomo chose to exhibit. The media went after the late President George H.W. Bush, just as they had during his life. They also attacked former Vice President Dan Quayle, former Vice President Dick Cheney and the late President Reagan.

Slate even devoted an entire article to kicking President George H.W. Bush’s service dog, Sully. Slate staff writer and curmudgeon Ruth Graham was apparently appalled at the kind words that were tied to a photo of the dog laying in front of the president’s casket. Among the many memorably stupid things Graham said was that it was “a bit demented to project soul-wrenching grief onto a dog’s decision to lie down in front of a casket.”

“This is simply a photograph of a dog doing something dogs love to do: Lie down,” Graham wrote. And this is just what journalists do, attack anything and everything on the right. Even service dogs.

HuffPost claimed that Bush had caused “Catastrophic Harm To LGBTQ People.” Several outlets accused Bush of being “racist” for running the infamous Willie Horton ad, which was actually run by a third-party group.

MSNBC tried to get both Bush and Trump by comparing ads and talking about how the “dog whistle politics” had gotten worse under the current administration.

Former conservative turned MSNBC host Joe Scarborough complained that conservatives dared to remember how much the media hated Bush. Morning Joe himself tried to rewrite the history: “It was like Ronald Reagan and Tip O'Neill had a deal that they fought like hell every day. And then at 6, they put it to the side.”

Hardly. The press attacked Bush, tried to destroy Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and did destroy Quayle … over a typo.

The only difference from then to now is that the press is far worse now.

3. Another bad week for media: The story about former CBS CEO Les Moonves continues to get more horrifying. The New York Times reported new details about the network investigation. “Investigators wrote that they had received ‘multiple reports’ about a network employee who was ‘on call’ to perform oral sex on Mr. Moonves.”

Moonves was one of the most powerful men in TV before his fall. The question now is whether the investigation will end other careers, too.

That wasn’t all of the bad news for the news media. Journalism took it on the chin this week. Mic was sold for a pittance, the right-leaning Weekly Standard appeared it may close its doors and Bloomberg might be laying off all of its political staff.

Mic, one of the popular web start-ups, collapsed from a peak valuation of $100 million to selling for just $5 million. The Weekly Standard, popular with right-leaning anti-Trump readers, was trying to stay alive despite reports of its demise.

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who spends tens of millions of dollars to fund anti-gun groups, is prepping for a possible presidential run. He expressed possible interest in having his massive media enterprise “not cover politics at all.” “Quite honestly,” reported Buzzfeed, “I don’t want all the reporters I’m paying to write a bad story about me,” he said in a radio interview.

Then there was a huge error at NPR involving the First Son. The public radio network falsely reported testimony that Donald Trump Jr. gave to the Senate. The NPR correction said, in part, an “earlier version of this report mischaracterized an answer Donald Trump Jr. gave to Senate investigators in 2017.” That’s a nifty way to say the reporter screwed up big time.

Dan Gainor is the Media Research Center’s Vice President for Business and Culture. He writes frequently about media for Fox News Opinion. He can also be contacted on Facebook and Twitter as dangainor.

Peggy Noonan: History finally gives George Bush his due

I feel it needs to be said again: George Herbert Walker Bush should have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his leadership during the collapse of the Soviet Union. It was an epic moment in modern world history, and a close-run thing. “One mishap and much could unravel,” former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney said, in his eulogy, of those days when the wall was falling, the Warsaw Pact countries rising and the Soviet Union trying to keep its footing as it came to terms with its inevitable end. Patience and shrewdness were needed from the leader of the West, a sensitive, knowing hand.

In “A World Transformed” (1998), Bush described his public approach as being marked by “gentle encouragement.” It caused him some trouble: “I had been under constant criticism for being too cautious, perhaps because I was subdued in my reaction to events. This was deliberate.” He didn’t want to embarrass or provoke. He reminded Mikhail Gorbachev, at the December 1989 Malta summit, that “I have not jumped up and down on the Berlin Wall.”

It was Bush’s gift to be sensitive even to Soviet generals who were seeing their world collapse around them. He knew a humiliated foe is a dangerous foe—and this foe had a nuclear arsenal. He slowly, carefully helped ease Russia out of its old ways and structures, helped it stand as its ground firmed up, and helped divided Germany blend together peacefully, fruitfully.

You’d think the world would have been at his feet, and the prizes flying in from Oslo. It didn’t happen. Why?

Keep reading Peggy Noonan's column in the Wall Street Journal. 

Millennial socialists have a lot to learn from George H.W. Bush’s legacy

I was born on November 11, 1989, the day after the Berlin Wall fell. Nearly 30 years later, President George H.W. Bush, the heroic leader who presided over the fall of the Soviet Union, has passed.

Unfortunately, my generation – the so-called millennials – has no memory of the Soviet Union, nor much of Bush’s presidency. It is no coincidence that socialism’s popularity is rising again as this generation – the first to be ignorant of the anti-communist legacy of Bush and his predecessor, President Ronald Reagan – comes of age.

Anti-communism was an extremely unifying movement in American political life during the late 20th century. From the Kennedy-led Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba in the 1960s, to the covert funding of the Soviet-Afghan War under President Reagan in the 1980s, Democrats and Republicans were united in defeating what was famously called by all “the evil empire.”

Anti-communism was also a component of the “big tent” modern conservative movement – one that the movement sadly has lost, which has contributed to the lack of cohesion within present day Republican Party foreign policy circles.

Former communists turned anti-communists, like Whittaker Chambers and James Burnham, who left the movement after witnessing some of the most horrific acts of the Soviet regime, played a critically influential role in the middle of the 20th century. It's a shame that millennial socialist leaders, like 29-year old congresswoman-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, have no memory of the horrible legacy of the communist regime that was responsible for the deaths of over 50 million people, and no memory of those who fought against it like our 41st president.

The millennial generation could learn from the 41st president's famous words: "We know what works. Freedom Works. We know what's right. Freedom's right."

That wasn't just talk. Indeed, it was the President Bush who slammed the door shut on the most murderous regime in human history. It was President Bush who carefully led NATO to shepherd the collapse of the USSR under Mikhail Gorbachev, and allow for a relatively peaceful dissolution of the former Soviet bloc and the transition to a market economy.

President Bush didn't stop there. On this side of the Atlantic, he negotiated and instituted NAFTA, the largest free trade bloc in human history, which has been updated and modernized by President Donald Trump and today's Canadian and Mexican leaders in the USMCA.

President Bush even attempted to run a balanced budget through unpopular fiscal tightening in the 1990s (which arguably was a major contributor to his 1992 electoral defeat), so that my generation wouldn't have to pay for fiscal irresponsibility decades later. It's something that I'm sure few in my entitled generation have ever fathomed to be grateful for.

Finally, today’s millennials should remember President Bush's fierce belief in the power of volunteerism – his "thousand points of light" vision, which was a fundamental belief that free people and hard work have the power to successfully fight social ills without the management of government at every turn. It's a message that must be heard by today's young socialists who call for immediate government intervention and an increasingly larger welfare state to fight every social ill.

Our 41st president has passed onto the next world. But we should seize this moment to go back and learn from his remarkable legacy.

Jon Hartley is an economics writer based in New York and was an economic policy adviser on Jeb Bush’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Dear President Bush, thank you for your tears

To President George W. Bush:

Mr. President, I’m writing to tell you that I watched the eulogy you gave your dad this week, and it hit me hard. I thought you were going to get through it without giving into emotion, but right at the end, grief snuck up on you and did a sucker punch to your gut. The tears came.

It was the line about how your dad was “a great and noble man, the best father a son or daughter could have.” That was the one that got you. It got me too.

A year ago this month, my brother and I said goodbye to my dad, a great and noble man, the best father a son or daughter could have. It was at a different sort of funeral though – a graveside service out in the hills of northwest Arkansas with about 25 people in attendance. I did the eulogy for my dad too, and like you, I cried as I gave it.

When it came time to lower Dad’s casket into the dirt, my brother Caleb cried as well. His tears – the tears of a man’s man who shared my grief – gave me comfort. Your tears at your dad’s funeral comforted Caleb and me this week.

Caleb and I texted with each other the other day about your eulogy, how it struck a raw nerve. We felt our hurt through your hurt. We saw our own tears on your face.

I know you’re a Bible reading man, so you’ll appreciate this verse that reminded me of you this week: “God is our merciful Father and the source of all comfort. He comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others. When they are troubled, we will be able to give them the same comfort God has given us” (2 Corinthians 1:3-4 NLT).

Even though you were the one weeping, God used your tears to give my brother and me a strange comfort: He allowed us to see our pain on another son’s face. He used you to remind us that we aren’t alone in our grief.

So thank you for your tears. Thank you for not holding back. I needed to see them, to be reminded that I’m in good company – that we all are.

Very truly yours,

Joshua Rogers

Joshua Rogers is a writer and attorney who lives in Washington, D.C. You can follow Joshua on Twitter @MrJoshuaRogers and Facebook, and read more of his writing at JoshuaRogers.com. You can also subscribe to emails with updates about his writing.

Steve Doocy: Bush funeral train brought back an almost-lost American tradition not seen for decades

As the presidential funeral train pulled into the final station, a 13-year-old school boy stood on the sidewalk in front of the Rexall drugstore where the crowd was ten deep. The kid was on his tiptoes because this was the biggest thing that had ever happened in that town and he didn’t want to miss a thing.

By today’s standards it was surprising he didn’t have his iPhone out, but there was a reason…the smartphone hadn’t been invented yet.

The day was April 2, 1969 and the funeral train of Dwight Eisenhower, America’s 34th President had just pulled into Ike’s boyhood home of Abilene, Kansas.

I know this for a fact because I was that 13-year-old boy standing on tiptoes, as an eyewitness to history.

FILE — The funeral train of Dwight Eisenhower. (National Archives)

Before the Bush train 4141 this week, Eisenhower was the last president to ride to his final resting place on the rails.

This week, 49 years later I watched as the funeral train of George Herbert Walker Bush, which was painted the same shade of sky blue as Air Force One made the final leg of his incredible journey home, not at 35,000 feet like Air Force One, but at ground level, where the people could get as close to two American presidents as they may ever be able to again.

The day in 1969 when President Eisenhower returned home, by my dumb luck of stopping to watch where I did, I wound up being barely 20 feet from the casket and I remember how despite being surrounded by thousands of people, it was pin-drop quiet.

It seemed to me that it was taking a long time for the honor guard to move the casket from the train, until the military band from Fort Riley played ‘Ruffles and Flourishes,' and it reminded us not only that a native son was returning home but this one was one of the most popular people on earth who’d been elected president twice.

That day became even more surreal to me at the time because many of the people I watched every night on the Walter Cronkite news seemed to have been beamed live into our town of 5,000 people.

Most of the Pentagon brass was in attendance including General Omar Bradley who was one of Ike’s pallbearers. There were legions of foreign diplomats and dignitaries who’d flown halfway around the globe to our little town in the middle of the map to say thank you, not only to the president of the United States, but to General Eisenhower, the Allied Forces commander who helped save the world in World War ll.

Ike’s family climbed into cars and then drove toward the Eisenhower Presidential Library Chapel just a couple blocks south on Buckeye.

Just behind the hearse was a limo I now presume to have been the only bulletproof car in Kansas, because it seemed to be jammed with important people. Former President Lyndon Johnson had to ride on jump seat, in the front, facing backward, as the then-current President, Richard Nixon got the good seat in the middle.

This week as Fox News broadcast the chopper shots of thousands gathered along the 70-mile route to College Station. I knew exactly how those people gathered in the Texas rain felt. They rearranged their schedules to make sure they would be at the various locations along the route when the train would pass.

The almost-lost American tradition of the funeral train, used once upon a time by presidents Lincoln, McKinley, Grant and FDR, gave everyday folks the chance to pay their respects to the commander in chief.

Late Thursday we saw social media snapshots of the Bush family riding one car behind the casket car, most poignantly with former President 43 facing the picture window, so those who came to salute his father could see him and his appreciation of what they were doing. He was paying respect to the people who were paying their respects.

Television is a wonderful thing, in its ability to bring the viewer up close to an event than they possibly could get on your own, but watching isn’t the same as paying your respects, in person. At least that’s how I feel almost 50 years after I first spotted that Presidential flag and heard Hail to the Chief, and we all knew we weren’t in Kansas anymore…we were a part of history.

Steve Doocy currently serves as co-host of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) FOX & Friends (weekdays 6-9AM/ET). Based in New York, he joined the network in 1996. His latest book is, “The Happy Cookbook.” Click here for more information on Steve Doocy.

President George H.W. Bush’s casket makes train journey to final resting place

The special funeral train carrying former President George H.W. Bush arrived in College Station, Texas on Thursday – the last leg of his journey before America's 41st president is laid to rest.

Following a funeral at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston, Bush’s casket – draped in an American flag – was loaded aboard a Union Pacific Locomotive 4141 train car in Spring, Texas.

Former President George W. Bush and his family were among those in attendance at the ceremony, after which they boarded the train.

Video

GEORGE H.W. BUSH HONORED AT TEXAS FUNERAL: ‘A LIFE NOBLY LIVED’

During the funeral, the elder Bush – who died Friday at age 94 – was remembered for his “decency, boundless kindness and consideration of others” by a longtime friend and former secretary of state, James Baker.

Bush is to be interred on the grounds of the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, on the Texas A&M University campus, near his wife, Barbara, and Robin, their daughter who died of leukemia at the age of 3 in 1953.

People paying their respects and take photos as the train carrying the casket of former President George H.W. Bush passes on Thursday. The train was making its way from Spring, Texas, to College Station. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool)

The train was scheduled to slow down through a number of towns along its roughly 70-mile trip. That included Magnolia, where hundreds of people gathered to see 4141 go by. Crowd members waved flags and cheered as the train arrived.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH’S FUNERAL, MEMORIAL SERVICES: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

There have been several other such funeral trains in the nation's history. That includes the one that carried Dwight D. Eisenhower’s body from the National Cathedral in Washington to his Kansas hometown of Abilene several decades ago, according to The Associated Press.

A man makes a patriotic display as the train carrying the casket of former President George H.W. Bush passes. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool)

Upon the train’s arrival in College Station, members of the Bush family and guests observed as the casket was placed into a hearse.

He was later buried during a private service.

Fox News Alex Pappas, Madeleine Rivera and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

George H.W. Bush will be taken to final resting place on his special ‘4141’ train

George H.W. Bush will be taken to his final resting place Thursday by a train designed more than a decade ago in honor of the former president.

Bush, who died on Nov. 30 at his home in Houston, was honored with multiple services in Washington, D.C. this week before his casket was flown back home to Texas. After services at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, the Union Pacific will transport Bush’s casket to College Station – where he will be buried at the George Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M University – on a custom train dedicated to Bush in 2005.

The train is painted light blue, meant to resemble Air Force One and bears the logo "4141" – a reference to Bush as the 41st U.S. president.

Former President George H.W. Bush and his wife Barbara wave out the window of a locomotive numbered 4141 on Oct. 18, 2005, at Texas A&M in College Station, Texas.  (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

The 4,300-horsepower train's sixth car, a converted baggage hauler called "Council Bluffs," has been fitted with transparent sides to allow mourners lining the tracks to be able to view Bush's flag-draped coffin.

Dedicated to Bush near his library in 2005, the president took a tour of the train and inquired about how it operated. And then he asked to drive it, Mike Iden, a former Union Pacific official, told KFDX-TV.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH'S FUNERAL, MEMORIAL SERVICES: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

“We described the operation with respect to what the conductor does at this desk and what the locomotive engineer does on the control stand on the other side of the cab. It was at that point President Bush said, ‘Can I take this for a drive? Can I run it?’” Iden recalled. “And we made the decision to bring him into the engineer seat on that side of the cab and give him a little training, and of course our engineer was directly behind him.”

During the unveiling of the train, Bush said he wanted his presidential library to “touch a broader cross-section of American life, encompassing an eventful period of our history.” It included an exhibit dedicated to the railroad industry in an effort to attract “the most unique, educational, and entertaining exhibits,” according to Union Pacific.

Former President George H.W. Bush was able to drive the train after a demonstration from crewmembers.  (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

“If we had the UP 4141 back when I was still in office, I might have left Air Force One behind more often,” Bush joked at the unveiling.

HOW GEORGE H.W. BUSH'S FUNERAL COMPARES TO TRADITIONS OF PAST PRESIDENTS' SERVICES

Aside from Bush’s connection to the specially-made locomotive, presidential funeral trains have played a part in American history.

President Abraham Lincoln’s train traveled through 180 cities and seven states to transport his body from Washington, D.C., to Springfield, Illinois, after he was assassinated. The train had been commissioned specifically for the president by the U.S. military, but the procession was the only time he used it, according to Union Pacific.

President Dwight Eisenhower was the last president to be transported by locomotive for his funeral. He was taken from Washington, D.C., to Abilene, Kansas – crossing through seven states – in 1969.

Union Pacific was contacted by federal officials in early 2009 and asked, at Bush's request, about providing a funeral train at some point, company spokesman Tom Lange said.

"We said, 'Of course, and also we have this locomotive that we would want to have obviously be part of it,'" Lange said. He noted that trains were the mode of transportation that first carried Bush to his service as a naval aviator in World War II and back home again.

Bush also previously recalled taking trains "all the time," and often slept on them during trips as a child with his family. He traveled by train as he campaigned for the presidency in 1988 and 1992 as well.

His final train ride, from Spring, Texas to College Station, is about 70 miles and will take more than 2 hours to complete as it travels through five towns. UP 4141 will leave with the president at about 1 p.m. Thursday.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Kaitlyn Schallhorn is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter: @K_Schallhorn.

George H.W. Bush’s funeral program for Texas services Thursday

Former President George H.W. Bush is finally home in Texas where he will be laid to rest later Thursday.

America's 41st president died late last week at his home in Houston at the age of 94. Following three days of tributes and a funeral at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., Bush's casket was brought back to Houston late Wednesday night.

More than 11,000 people have paid their respects to Bush as he lay in repose at St. Martin's Episcopal Church, where his family has long worshiped.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH EULOGISTS RECALL FUNNY MEMORIES, STANDOUT QUOTES: READ THE HIGHLIGHTS

The final funeral will begin around 11 a.m. ET Thursday at St. Martin's Episcopal Church. After, Bush will be taken to the George Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M University where he will be laid to rest alongside Barbara Bush, his wife of 73 years who died in April, and Robin Bush, the daughter they lost to leukemia in 1953 at age 3.

Read on for a look at the funeral program.

Organ Prelude

Arranged by Jari A. Villanueva

Brass Voluntary

"America the Beautiful"

Hymn 

"O Beautiful for Spacious Skies"

Anthem

"This is My Country" by the St. Martin's Parish Choir

Reception of the Body

Opening Sentences

National Anthem

"The Star-Spangled Banner"

The Collect

The First Lesson

Lamentations 3:22-26; 31-33 by Marshall Lloyd Bush

Reading

Psalm 23 by Barbara Pierce Bush, Noelle Lucila Bush and Elizabeth Dwen Andrews

Tribute

Former Secretary of State James Baker

Tribute

Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush

The Second Lesson

1 Corinthians 12:31b – 13:13 by Georgia Grace Koch and Nancy Ellis LeBlond Sosa

Hymn

"Eternal Father, Strong to Save" (verses 1-2)

Gospel Reading

John 11:21-27 by Rev. Martin J. Bastian of St. Martin's Episcopal Church

Hymn

"Eternal Father, Strong to Save" (verses 3-4)

Homily

Rev. Dr. Russell J. Levenson Jr., rector of St. Martin's Episcopal Church

Anthem

"Amazing Grace" by The Oak Ridge Boys

The Apostles’ Creed

Anthem

"The Lord's Prayer" by Reba McEntire

The Prayers of the People

Rev. Peter G. Cheney, chaplain of St. Ann's Episcopal Church in Kennebunkport, Maine

Rev. Dr. Susannah E. McBay of St. Martin's Episcopal Church

The Commendation

The Blessing

Rt. Rev. C. Andrew Doyle, bishop of The Episcopal Church of Texas

Hymn 

"Onward, Christian Soldiers"

Organ and Brass Voluntary

"Toccata"

Departure 

The Bush family will depart the church following the service around 12:15 ET. Later in the afternoon, the specially-designed train dedicated to the former president more than a decade ago will depart with the family and Bush's casket for College Station.

The trip is about 70 miles and will take more than 2 hours to complete.

Arrival Ceremony

Bush's casket is scheduled to arrive at Texas A&M University around 4:30 ET where a ceremony will take place.

Following the ceremony, Bush will be interned at George Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M University during a private event.

Kaitlyn Schallhorn is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter: @K_Schallhorn.

For George H.W. Bush’s funeral, The Oak Ridge Boys traveled with suits everywhere they went just in case

Ever since The Oak Ridge Boys were asked to perform at former President George H.W. Bush’s funeral, the country music group reportedly made sure to take suits with them wherever they traveled just in case.

And on Thursday, The Oak Ridge Boys will don those suits and sing “Amazing Grace” at the 41st president’s funeral service in Houston.

Bush was 94 years old when he died late last week at his Houston home. After three days of memorials and a funeral at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. – which was attended by President Trump and the first lady as well as all of the former living presidents and their wives: Barack and Michelle Obama; Bill and Hillary Clinton; and Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter – his casket was brought back to Texas where he will be honored with another funeral service before his burial.

Bush will be laid to rest at his presidential library at Texas A&M University in College Station, next to Barbara Bush, his wife of 73 years who died in April, and Robin Bush, the daughter they lost to leukemia in 1953 at the age of 3.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH PRAISED FOR MAKING MAINE PARAMEDIC'S 'DREAM COME TRUE'

Duane Allen, a member of The Oak Ridge Boys, previously told Fox News the group’s relationship with Bush began when they were scheduled to perform at a White House event in the 1980s when Bush was then the vice president. Due to his schedule, Bush wouldn’t be able to see the performance, but he made sure to stop by and see the group before he left.

“We believe in our hearts we’ll see him again one day, and we’ll sing it for him again.”

— Richard Sterban

“We were doing a soundcheck in the afternoon and here comes this long and lanky guy with a sack over his shoulder running toward the stage,” Allen said. “And when he got to the stage, he said, ‘Boys, I’m a big fan of yours and … would you do a song or two for me because I’m a huge fan.’”

GEORGE H.W. BUSH’S FUNERAL PROGRAM FOR TEXAS SERVICES THURSDAY

After that, a relationship developed between Bush and the country music group, Allen told The Tennessean. He said they would travel with their wives to Bush’s home in Kennebunkport, Maine, and spend summers with the family. They also performed “Amazing Grace” multiple times for the president, including at his inauguration ceremony.

“Those were some of the most special times in our lives,” Allen said.

After they were asked to perform at the funeral, The Oak Ridge Boys made sure to travel with a suit and tie just in case, they told The Tennessean. They flew to Texas from Spokane, Washington, Wednesday night after a concert and will fly immediately back to Washington.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH MOURNERS PAY TRIBUTE TO THE LATE PRESIDENT WITH COLORFUL SOCKS

Richard Sterban of the band said Bush specifically requested they sing “Amazing Grace” at his funeral, as it was his favorite song.

“There’s no way we wouldn’t do it,” Sterban told The Tennessean. “He always taught us to do the right thing, and it is a tremendous honor. One final time here on this earth, we’re going to sing it for him, and we believe in our hearts we’ll see him again one day, and we’ll sing it for him again.”

After Bush’s death, the group recalled the time they gifted Bush a flashy jacket “which covered every aspect of his life.” The blue and white speckled jacked was covered with images of an American flag, the White House and the U.S. Capitol building.

“Barbara said, ‘Oh My God, If he starts wearing that everywhere I may kill all four of you!’” The Oak Ridge Boys recalled.

Aside from The Oak Ridge Boys, country music star Reba McEntire will perform at Thursday’s service at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church. She will sing “The Lord’s Prayer” at the service.

McEntire shared a touching photo of her with Bush on Instagram after he passed away. In the picture, she is sitting next to the former president holding his hand.

"My favorite," McEntire captioned the photo, with the hashtags "great president" and "great friend."

Kaitlyn Schallhorn is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter: @K_Schallhorn.

For George H.W. Bush’s funeral, The Oak Ridge Boys traveled with suits everywhere they went just in case

Ever since The Oak Ridge Boys were asked to perform at former President George H.W. Bush’s funeral, the country music group reportedly made sure to take suits with them wherever they traveled just in case.

And on Thursday, The Oak Ridge Boys will don those suits and sing “Amazing Grace” at the 41st president’s funeral service in Houston.

Bush was 94 years old when he died late last week at his Houston home. After three days of memorials and a funeral at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. – which was attended by President Trump and the first lady as well as all of the former living presidents and their wives: Barack and Michelle Obama; Bill and Hillary Clinton; and Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter – his casket was brought back to Texas where he will be honored with another funeral service before his burial.

Bush will be laid to rest at his presidential library at Texas A&M University in College Station, next to Barbara Bush, his wife of 73 years who died in April, and Robin Bush, the daughter they lost to leukemia in 1953 at the age of 3.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH PRAISED FOR MAKING MAINE PARAMEDIC'S 'DREAM COME TRUE'

Duane Allen, a member of The Oak Ridge Boys, previously told Fox News the group’s relationship with Bush began when they were scheduled to perform at a White House event in the 1980s when Bush was then the vice president. Due to his schedule, Bush wouldn’t be able to see the performance, but he made sure to stop by and see the group before he left.

“We believe in our hearts we’ll see him again one day, and we’ll sing it for him again.”

— Richard Sterban

“We were doing a soundcheck in the afternoon and here comes this long and lanky guy with a sack over his shoulder running toward the stage,” Allen said. “And when he got to the stage, he said, ‘Boys, I’m a big fan of yours and … would you do a song or two for me because I’m a huge fan.’”

GEORGE H.W. BUSH’S FUNERAL PROGRAM FOR TEXAS SERVICES THURSDAY

After that, a relationship developed between Bush and the country music group, Allen told The Tennessean. He said they would travel with their wives to Bush’s home in Kennebunkport, Maine, and spend summers with the family. They also performed “Amazing Grace” multiple times for the president, including at his inauguration ceremony.

“Those were some of the most special times in our lives,” Allen said.

After they were asked to perform at the funeral, The Oak Ridge Boys made sure to travel with a suit and tie just in case, they told The Tennessean. They flew to Texas from Spokane, Washington, Wednesday night after a concert and will fly immediately back to Washington.

GEORGE H.W. BUSH MOURNERS PAY TRIBUTE TO THE LATE PRESIDENT WITH COLORFUL SOCKS

Richard Sterban of the band said Bush specifically requested they sing “Amazing Grace” at his funeral, as it was his favorite song.

“There’s no way we wouldn’t do it,” Sterban told The Tennessean. “He always taught us to do the right thing, and it is a tremendous honor. One final time here on this earth, we’re going to sing it for him, and we believe in our hearts we’ll see him again one day, and we’ll sing it for him again.”

After Bush’s death, the group recalled the time they gifted Bush a flashy jacket “which covered every aspect of his life.” The blue and white speckled jacked was covered with images of an American flag, the White House and the U.S. Capitol building.

“Barbara said, ‘Oh My God, If he starts wearing that everywhere I may kill all four of you!’” The Oak Ridge Boys recalled.

Aside from The Oak Ridge Boys, country music star Reba McEntire will perform at Thursday’s service at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church. She will sing “The Lord’s Prayer” at the service.

McEntire shared a touching photo of her with Bush on Instagram after he passed away. In the picture, she is sitting next to the former president holding his hand.

"My favorite," McEntire captioned the photo, with the hashtags "great president" and "great friend."

Kaitlyn Schallhorn is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter: @K_Schallhorn.