Hillary Clinton’s use of private email server among ‘gravest’ offenses to transparency, judge says

A conservative group won a court victory this week when a federal judge ordered more fact-finding in the Hillary Clinton email investigation. In his ruling Thursday, U.S. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth assailed Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of state as “one of the gravest modern offenses to government transparency.” Conservative … Continue reading “Hillary Clinton’s use of private email server among ‘gravest’ offenses to transparency, judge says”

A conservative group won a court victory this week when a federal judge ordered more fact-finding in the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

In his ruling Thursday, U.S. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth assailed Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of state as “one of the gravest modern offenses to government transparency.”

Conservative group Judicial Watch had filed a Freedom of information Act (FOIA) lawsuit against the State and Justice departments, alleging that Clinton’s email practices represented a deliberate effort to violate the FOIA, Politico reported.

On Friday, Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton praised Lamberth’s ruling, telling Fox News it showed the court was “not terribly convinced” that former FBI Director James Comey adequately investigated Clinton’s use of the private server while secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.

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As a result of the judge’s ruling, “Some people like Mrs. Clinton potentially will have to answer further questions,” Fitton said.

On Thursday, Lamberth ordered the State and Justice departments to work with Judicial Watch on a discovery plan to determine whether Clinton used the server to circumvent FOIA requirements, the Hill reported.

President Trump and Republicans have repeatedly slammed Clinton’s use of the private email server, arguing in part that the practice potentially placed classified government information at risk.

Clinton was found to have deleted emails that she said were personal and not related to her State Department work. Comey announced during the 2016 presidential campaign that Clinton’s handling of emails was “extremely careless” but did not warrant criminal charges.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Pompeo urges Senate to spike Yemen resolution, defends Saudi ties amid Khashoggi furor

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urged senators on Wednesday to kill a resolution to end U.S. involvement in the Yemen civil war, arguing it would be against American interests and could derail fragile United Nations peace talks — as the administration ramped up its defense of U.S.-Saudi ties amid outrage over the killing of activist Jamal Khashoggi.

Pompeo told reporters that “we are on the cusp” of a possible ceasefire as U.N. Special Envoy Martin Griffiths is due to sit down with both parties of the catastrophic conflict next month in Sweden — coming after months of trying to get representatives from both the Saudi-led coalition and the Iran-backed Houthis to sit down and talk. Pompeo said the "poorly-timed" resolution could hurt the prospect of a cease-fire.

“It is the view of the administration … that passing a resolution at this point undermines that, it would encourage the Houthis, it would encourage the Iranians, and it would undermine the fragile agreement for everyone to go to Sweden and have this discussion,” he said.

Pompeo, along with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, briefed senators on U.S. involvement in the civil war. The years-long war, which began when the Houthis ousted the Yemen government in 2014, has wreaked havoc upon the country and led to the bombing of civilians and a devastating cholera outbreak.

Tens of thousands of people are believed to have been killed in the conflict. Two-thirds of Yemen’s 27 million population rely on aid and more than 8 million are at risk of starvation. Griffiths told the U.N. Security Council this month that Yemen “remains the largest humanitarian disaster in the world” and civilians are dying from preventable diseases as the economy remains on the verge of collapse.

“This requires urgent action from all of us,” he said.

The U.S. is not directly involved in the civil war, but provides assistance to the Saudi-led coalition, including intelligence sharing and weapons sales. There has been increased scrutiny of that support in the wake of the killing of writer Jamal Khashoggi at a Saudi consulate in Turkey. U.S. intelligence agencies reportedly have concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman must have at least known about the plan to kill Khashoggi, although Trump has appeared to doubt that assessment.

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Pompeo told reporters Wednesday that the murder was "heinous" but there was no piece of intelligence that links bin Salman to the murder.

Earlier, Pompeo told senators in prepared remarks that abandoning the conflict in Yemen was a “bad call” and would “do immense damage to U.S. national security interests and those of our Middle Eastern allies and partners.”

He said the first mission was to help the Saudis in the fight against the Iran-backed rebels for the control of Sanaa as part of a broader push to combat Iranian influence in the region.

“The U.S. interest in this first mission is to counter Iran’s regional ambitions and to help our allies and partners protect themselves,” Pompeo said. “Just as we must constrain Iranian expansion in Syria, in the Golan Heights, and in Iraq, we must also prevent Iran from entrenching itself in Yemen.”

He said that the other objectives were to protect Americans in the region and also to “decapitate” the rising presence of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), which has been gaining ground particularly in the south of Yemen.

Mattis agreed with Pompeo’s warnings to senators, saying that U.S. disengagement would “have the opposite effect of mitigating the humanitarian crisis.”

“Pulling back our limited U.S. military support, our weapons sales to our partners, and our protection of the Saudi and Emirati populations would be misguided on the eve of the promising initial negotiations. It took us too long to get here,” Mattis said in his prepared remarks.

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The showdown on Capitol Hill comes as the administration has come out swinging in its defense of the U.S.-Saudi relationship.

President Trump, an in interview with The Washington Post, doubled down on his past statements that a strong U.S.-Saudi relationship is good for the U.S. national interest, and has pointed to lowering oil prices as an example of that relationship.

“I’m the president of this country. I have to do what’s the best for our country. We have a very important ally in Saudi Arabia,” he said. “We have an ally that has tremendous oil reserves, which are – frankly, they can make prices go up and down, and I want to keep them down.”

Pompeo wrote in The Wall Street Journal Wednesday that degrading U.S.-Saudi ties would be a “grave mistake” and again drew a contrast between the Saudi and U.S. actions, and Iran’s.

“The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has invested billions to relieve suffering in Yemen. Iran has invested zero,” he wrote.

He also used the op-ed to announce that the U.S. is providing almost $131 million in food assistance for the country via The World Food Program and other organizations.

Fox News’ Nick Kalman and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.

Ten years after Mumbai terror attacks, US offers $5M reward for info leading to attackers

The U.S. on Sunday offered up to $5 million for information about the attackers who unleashed terror in India's largest city 10 years ago in a horrifying siege that killed 166 people, including six Americans.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the reward in a statement, calling for justice for the families of the victims in Mumbai.

10 YEARS ON, MUMBAI MOVES ON FROM ATTACKS BUT SCARS REMAIN

"It is an affront to the families of the victims that, after ten years, those who planned the Mumbai attack have still not been convicted for their involvement," Pompeo said. "We call upon all countries, particularly Pakistan, to uphold their UN Security Council obligations to implement sanctions against the terrorists responsible for this atrocity, including Lashkar-e-Tayyiba and its affiliates."

A girl walks past a wall of the Chabad House, with bullet marks on the eve of the tenth anniversary of the Mumbai terror attacks in Mumbai, India on Sunday, Nov 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

The reward, which was offered by the State Department's Rewards for Justice Program, is extended to those with "information leading to the arrest or conviction of any individual who was involved in planning or facilitating the 2008 Mumbai attack."

India's financial capital with a population of over 18 million, Mumbai turned into a war zone on Nov. 26, 2008, as a group of Pakistani gunmen who launched coordinated attacks on the city. They targeted two luxury hotels, a Jewish center, a tourist restaurant and a crowded train station. Three days of carnage killed 166 people, including foreign tourists, and wounded hundreds more.

FLASHBACK: SEE PHOTOS FROM THE 2008 MUMBAI TERRORIST ATTACKS

The focal point of the assault was the iconic Taj Mahal Palace hotel. Thirty-one people died inside the hotel, including staff trying to guide the guests to safety. Images of smoke leaping out of the city landmark have come to define the 60-hour siege.

The focal point of the assault was the iconic Taj Mahal Palace hotel. Thirty-one people died inside the hotel, including staff trying to guide the guests to safety. Images of smoke leaping out of the city landmark have come to define the 60-hour siege. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

India blamed the attack on the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, throwing relations between the nuclear-armed neighbors into a tailspin. Indian officials accused Pakistan's intelligence agency of working with the militant group to mastermind the attack — an allegation Islamabad denied.

Pompeo, in his statement, said the U.S. stood with the friends and family of those who "were lost in this act of barbarism, including six American citizens. The barbarity of 26/11 shocked the entire world."

Fox News’ Kelly Phares and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Ten years after Mumbai terror attacks, US offers $5M reward for info leading to attackers

The U.S. on Sunday offered up to $5 million for information about the attackers who unleashed terror in India's largest city 10 years ago in a horrifying siege that killed 166 people, including six Americans.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the reward in a statement, calling for justice for the families of the victims in Mumbai.

10 YEARS ON, MUMBAI MOVES ON FROM ATTACKS BUT SCARS REMAIN

"It is an affront to the families of the victims that, after ten years, those who planned the Mumbai attack have still not been convicted for their involvement," Pompeo said. "We call upon all countries, particularly Pakistan, to uphold their UN Security Council obligations to implement sanctions against the terrorists responsible for this atrocity, including Lashkar-e-Tayyiba and its affiliates."

A girl walks past a wall of the Chabad House, with bullet marks on the eve of the tenth anniversary of the Mumbai terror attacks in Mumbai, India on Sunday, Nov 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

The reward, which was offered by the State Department's Rewards for Justice Program, is extended to those with "information leading to the arrest or conviction of any individual who was involved in planning or facilitating the 2008 Mumbai attack."

India's financial capital with a population of over 18 million, Mumbai turned into a war zone on Nov. 26, 2008, as a group of Pakistani gunmen who launched coordinated attacks on the city. They targeted two luxury hotels, a Jewish center, a tourist restaurant and a crowded train station. Three days of carnage killed 166 people, including foreign tourists, and wounded hundreds more.

FLASHBACK: SEE PHOTOS FROM THE 2008 MUMBAI TERRORIST ATTACKS

The focal point of the assault was the iconic Taj Mahal Palace hotel. Thirty-one people died inside the hotel, including staff trying to guide the guests to safety. Images of smoke leaping out of the city landmark have come to define the 60-hour siege.

The focal point of the assault was the iconic Taj Mahal Palace hotel. Thirty-one people died inside the hotel, including staff trying to guide the guests to safety. Images of smoke leaping out of the city landmark have come to define the 60-hour siege. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

India blamed the attack on the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, throwing relations between the nuclear-armed neighbors into a tailspin. Indian officials accused Pakistan's intelligence agency of working with the militant group to mastermind the attack — an allegation Islamabad denied.

Pompeo, in his statement, said the U.S. stood with the friends and family of those who "were lost in this act of barbarism, including six American citizens. The barbarity of 26/11 shocked the entire world."

Fox News’ Kelly Phares and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Heather Nauert a ‘leading contender’ to replace Haley as UN ambassador, sources say

State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert is a "leading contender" to replace Nikki Haley as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, two sources familiar with the selection process told Fox News on Monday.

Nauert met with President Trump in the Oval Office earlier Monday, though it is not known if they discussed the position. Several other officials have been named as potential candidates, including U.S. Ambassador to France Jamie McCourt.

Haley, the former governor of South Carolina, surprised many observers earlier this month when she announced she would leave the post of U.N. envoy by the end of this year. She had been considered an effective advocate for U.S. interests at the world body, as well as an independent force in the Trump administration.

TRUMP TELLS FOX NEWS CARAVAN MIGRANTS 'WASTING THEIR TIME'

Nauert, a former Fox News host, was named State Department spokesperson in April 2017. Earlier this year, she also was named acting undersecretary for public diplomacy and public affairs after the dismissal of Steve Goldstein from that post.

On Oct. 20, Trump told The Associated Press after a Nevada campaign rally that he was interviewing five candidates to replace Haley — three women and two men — and said he hoped to select someone "very quickly." When asked if he would prefer to have a woman in the job, he said "Yes," later adding: "I think I might prefer that, but we'll see."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Ten years after Mumbai terror attacks, US offers $5M reward for info leading to attackers

The U.S. on Sunday offered up to $5 million for information about the attackers who unleashed terror in India's largest city 10 years ago in a horrifying siege that killed 166 people, including six Americans.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the reward in a statement, calling for justice for the families of the victims in Mumbai.

10 YEARS ON, MUMBAI MOVES ON FROM ATTACKS BUT SCARS REMAIN

"It is an affront to the families of the victims that, after ten years, those who planned the Mumbai attack have still not been convicted for their involvement," Pompeo said. "We call upon all countries, particularly Pakistan, to uphold their UN Security Council obligations to implement sanctions against the terrorists responsible for this atrocity, including Lashkar-e-Tayyiba and its affiliates."

A girl walks past a wall of the Chabad House, with bullet marks on the eve of the tenth anniversary of the Mumbai terror attacks in Mumbai, India on Sunday, Nov 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

The reward, which was offered by the State Department's Rewards for Justice Program, is extended to those with "information leading to the arrest or conviction of any individual who was involved in planning or facilitating the 2008 Mumbai attack."

India's financial capital with a population of over 18 million, Mumbai turned into a war zone on Nov. 26, 2008, as a group of Pakistani gunmen who launched coordinated attacks on the city. They targeted two luxury hotels, a Jewish center, a tourist restaurant and a crowded train station. Three days of carnage killed 166 people, including foreign tourists, and wounded hundreds more.

FLASHBACK: SEE PHOTOS FROM THE 2008 MUMBAI TERRORIST ATTACKS

The focal point of the assault was the iconic Taj Mahal Palace hotel. Thirty-one people died inside the hotel, including staff trying to guide the guests to safety. Images of smoke leaping out of the city landmark have come to define the 60-hour siege.

The focal point of the assault was the iconic Taj Mahal Palace hotel. Thirty-one people died inside the hotel, including staff trying to guide the guests to safety. Images of smoke leaping out of the city landmark have come to define the 60-hour siege. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

India blamed the attack on the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, throwing relations between the nuclear-armed neighbors into a tailspin. Indian officials accused Pakistan's intelligence agency of working with the militant group to mastermind the attack — an allegation Islamabad denied.

Pompeo, in his statement, said the U.S. stood with the friends and family of those who "were lost in this act of barbarism, including six American citizens. The barbarity of 26/11 shocked the entire world."

Fox News’ Kelly Phares and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.