Taylor Swift concert had facial recognition scan for stalkers: report

Concertgoers who viewed a kiosk display set up at a Taylor Swift show in May were reportedly caught on camera by facial recognition software that was searching for stalkers. The technology was used at the pop star’s performance at the Rose Bowl on May 18 via a booth that played videos from her rehearsal, Rolling … Continue reading “Taylor Swift concert had facial recognition scan for stalkers: report”

Concertgoers who viewed a kiosk display set up at a Taylor Swift show in May were reportedly caught on camera by facial recognition software that was searching for stalkers.

The technology was used at the pop star’s performance at the Rose Bowl on May 18 via a booth that played videos from her rehearsal, Rolling Stone reported Monday.

TAYLOR SWIFT NAMED 2018’S MOST INFLUENTIAL PERSON ON TWITTER

The disclosure came from Oak View Group’s Chief Security Officer Mike Downing, who was invited to the event by the kiosk’s manufacturing company, the outlet said. That company was not identified. Downing told Rolling Stone that he was there to view a software demo.

“Everybody who went by would stop and stare at it, and the software would start working,” Downing told the outlet.

ZAYN MALIK SAYS TAYLOR SWIFT ‘WAS TRAVELING AROUND IN A SUITCASE’ DURING THE SUMMER OF 2017

The snapshots obtained by the camera were then sent over to a “command post” in Nashville that compared them against a catalog of her stalkers, Downing said.

Neither representatives for Swift or the Rose Bowl Arena immediately returned Fox News’ request for comment.

China tells Canada to release Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou or face severe consequences

China has warned Canada it will face severe consequences unless it releases Huawei Technologies’ chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who faces extradition to the U.S. after being arrested in the country last week.

Meng, 46, was taken into custody on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018, on behalf of the U.S., while she was transferring flights in Vancouver, the tech company said. She’s accused of trying to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran. She is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, a former Chinese military engineer worth $3.2 billion, according to Forbes magazine.

During her bail hearing on Friday, a prosecutor for the Canadian government said U.S. charges against her have to do with Huawei using an unofficial subsidiary to access the Iran market in dealings that would contravene U.S. sanctions. The prosecutor said she is accused of fraud.

If extradited to the U.S., she could face charges of “conspiracy to defraud multiple financial institutions,” which holds a “maximum sentence of 30 years for each charge,” Reuters reported.

HUAWEI CFO MENG WANZHOU’S ARREST MAY PROMPT CHINA TO RETALIATE, ‘TAKE HOSTAGES,’ EXPERT SAYS

Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng summoned the Canadian ambassador in Beijing and “lodged a strong protest,” a statement from China’s Foreign Ministry stated. The ministry called Meng’s arrest “extremely nasty.”

Meng Wanzhou, right, attends a bail hearing at British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver on Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. (AP)

“China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained person, and earnestly protect their lawful, legitimate rights, otherwise Canada must accept full responsibility for the serious consequences caused,” a statement from Le stated.

It was not immediately clear what the consequences would entail.

David Mulroney, a former Canadian ambassador to China, said the consequences would probably have to do with trade.

HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CFO ARRESTED IN CANADA, ACCUSED OF VIOLATING IRAN SANCTIONS

“The ability to talk about free trade will be put in the icebox for a while. But we’re going to have to live with that,” Mulroney said, according to Reuters. “That’s the price of dealing with a country like China.”

Chinese officials blasted Meng’s arrest, and experts warned more forceful actions could be coming.

The chief financial officer of China’s Huawei Technologies was arrested in Canada on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018. (AP)

James Lewis, the director of technology policy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, told Axios the U.S. should be prepared for a backlash and warned American tech executives to steer clear of China for now.

"If I was an American tech executive, I wouldn't travel to China this week," warned Lewis, who labeled Huawei "one of the Chinese government's pet companies" and charged the communist country's leaders wouldn't be afraid to "take hostages."

Meng will spend the weekend in jail after a Canadian judge said Friday that he needs to weigh her proposed bail conditions. The bail hearing continues Monday.

Fox News’ Katherine Lam and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com. You can follow her at @Kathleen_Joyce8 on Twitter.

Uber, Lyft drivers get $17.22 hourly wage guarantee in New York after commission’s vote

New York City taxi regulators approved new pay standards for app-based car services Tuesday that they say will raise drivers' annual earnings by $10,000 a year, making it the first U.S. city to set such minimum pay standards.

The city's Taxi and Limousine Commission approved the rules that will establish a per-minute and per-mile payment formula for Uber, Lyft, Via and Gett. The formula is supposed to result in drivers earning $17.22 an hour.

"This first-time regulation to form a floor for app driver earnings and give a modest first raise is a long time in the making," said Bhairavi Desai, executive director of the Taxi Workers Alliance. "It's the first real attempt anywhere to stop app driver pay cuts, which is an Uber and Lyft business practice at the heart of poverty wages. "

New York's City Council authorized the commission to set pay standards in August at the same time that it approved a cap on new vehicle licenses for ride-hail services.

SECRET FACEBOOK DOCS SHOW COMPANY ALLEGEDLY GAVE ADVERTISERS SPECIAL ACCESS TO USER DATA

Both yellow cab and ride-hail drivers have complained for years that the surge in app-based cars in New York has driven down pay across the industry, making it impossible for many drivers to earn a living.

The new formula factors in drivers' total working time and their time spent transporting fares in order to incentivize efficient use of drivers. The rules are intended to cut traffic congestion by reducing the amount of time drivers spend circling around in busy areas without fares, but that could result in longer waits for a ride.

Taxi commission chairwoman Meera Joshi said she believes New Yorkers "are willing to pay a little more and wait a little longer so the people transporting them are able to provide for themselves and their families."

But Uber, which is pushing for congestion pricing as a way to unclog Manhattan traffic, said in a statement that the new rules "will lead to higher than necessary fare increases for riders while missing an opportunity to deal with congestion in Manhattan's central business district."

Lyft said the rules "will undermine competition by allowing certain companies to pay drivers lower wages." It called the new system "a step backward for New Yorkers."

Video gaming becomes official after-school league at US high schools

PHOENIX – Charles Slack is a student at Mesa Community College who plays video games several hours a day. He considers it his passion. And he’s not alone.

As video games keep gaining popularity, schools are taking notice – and trying to capitalize on the booming trend.

Schools across the country are beginning to recognize gaming as an “electronic sport” – and making it an official, after-school activity, complete with statewide tournaments.

Arizona became just the latest in a growing number of states welcoming video games in schools. Beginning in February, the Arizona Interscholastic Association, or AIA, will partner with Legacy eSports to start a regular season, tournament, and championship for schools to compete in.

“We find this as a unique opportunity to get those students that might normally go home after school and play a game on their computer but now get them into school to where they can meet up with their peers,” said Brian Bolitho, AIA director of business development. “And school pride—compete for a state tournament and a championship there and engage these students that normally might not be involved in their high school community.”

Charles Slack is a student at Mesa Community College who plays video games several hours a day. He considers it his passion. And he’s not alone.<br data-cke-eol="1"> (Fox News)

Bolitho said at some Arizona schools, there’s already been more students at the eSports informational meetings than football, basketball, and baseball informational meetings combined.

Legacy eSports will be launching similar leagues in California, New Mexico and Louisiana next year. The High School eSports League, another group that organizes eSports tournaments and clubs, has partnered with high schools in almost every state, including Hawaii, Florida, Texas and New York.

But the move has triggered a backlash among parents, mental health professionals and athletic coaches who call the trend both troubling – and dangerous.

“I think sitting in front of a TV is a sedative – your metabolism is going to change. It’s going to cause us to become fatter, it’s going to cause us to become more unhealthy than we are as a community and a society versus if we can get out and get everyone playing together, it’s better for our brains,” said Brieann Salisbury, a mother of two from Washington state, where some schools have video game leagues.

She said she will not allow her kids to join gaming clubs.

“It’s better for our kids to be outside and enjoy it,” she said.

Brian Bolitho, AIA director of business development, said at some Arizona schools, there’s already been more students at the eSports informational meetings than at informational meetings of football, basketball, and baseball combined. (Fox News)

Michael Fraser, a child psychologist who specializes in video game addiction, said he’s seen firsthand the drawbacks of gaming. He said an alarming number of kids are becoming video game addicts, which affects their grades and could make them physically aggressive.

“I think it starts out as recreational. Certainly they have fun,” Fraser said. “A lot of kids, instead of doing their homework, are going to play the video games after school. The homework then either doesn’t get done or the homework gets pushed back to a very late hour where the child is either too tired to do it or they’re up late, they lose sleep. The next day they’re showing poor focus, poor attention. They fall asleep in class.”

Regardless of the backlash, gaming keeps growing at an astronomical pace. The 2018 professional League of Legends video game final was watched live by more than 200 million people. That’s more than the Super Bowl, NBA Finals, and Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony combined, according to figures compiled by ESC, Sports Media Watch, and Variety.

And supporters don’t only point to its growth as the reason to train students. Professional gaming has become a lucrative enterprise – with players making millions a year sitting on a couch for video game competitions.

Bolitho said more than 70 universities are offering scholarships for students to play video games at their college and he said studies have shown that kids playing eSports are more likely to pursue STEM-related careers.

There are more than 70 universities offering scholarships for students to play video games at their colleges. (Fox News)

“There's obviously opportunity for these students, after the fact, to then get involved in those tech-related fields—streaming, programming and development,” Bolitho said. “So, that's the avenue that we're looking at here.”

Some say gaming could also help with socialization, particularly with kids who have trouble making friends.

“I think electronic sports…they provide you ways to socialize and become closer to other people,” said Luis Perez Cortes, an Arizona State University doctoral student who plans on conducting eSports research and how it affects learning. “In schools, that might translate to any number of other positive things, such as greater feelings of belongingness. This might also increase retention or, in other words, how students want to stay in school maybe even because they can now play video games in school.”

The amount of time Americans spend playing video games (and board games) has risen by 50 percent since 2003, according to the Washington Post.

Pure eSports in Gilbert, Ariz., opened up recently this year and houses gaming counsels for teams like Saint Benedictine University – Mesa eSports team to use for practice. (Fox News)

That has athletic instructors concerned, particularly since some schools are encouraging gaming.

“If they do this, they also understand that they need to go out and play—that they need to do physical activities in addition to this,” said William Kuehl, Grand Canyon University exercise science professor and lead for physical education.

Studies on the effects of gaming are uneven. One study by RMIT University in Australia study found competition in video games leads to increased aggression. Another study by the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine found that “competitive active video games improved children’s psychological responses (affect and rate of perceived exertion) compared with single play, providing a solution that may contribute toward improved adherence to physical activity."

AIA and Legacy eSports said they steer away from violent games and prohibit games rated “M” for “M” for Mature.

“They’re a trend, I think it's important for us to recognize that and channel it and not try to fight it,” Kuehl said. “I don't think that that's going to solve anything, anyway. Children are going to do what they're going to do.”

Charlie Lapastora is a multimedia reporter based in Phoenix, Ariz.

Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year.

“He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone that would,” Chisolm, the founder of “50 Shades of Silence,” told Fox News.

His threats didn’t end there, she said. Chisolm, a former news anchor, became the latest victim of revenge porn. Within weeks, he began texting her lewd photos and videos he had taken of her while she was asleep. He threatened to make them public – and then followed through on his threats, creating a website full of naked images of her.

She grew frustrated because, for months, there was nothing she could do about it. A new app and search engine aims to help women like Chisolm by helping them find all their images on the web – and, in some instances, helping them pull them from the Internet.

“The quicker you can get the photos, the content, the harassing memes, whatever it is removed,” Chisolm said, “obviously, it can spread quickly so you want to move.”

“They (victims) need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.” (Fox News)

The app, FacePinPoint, launched three months ago and claims to be the first of its kind. It uses facial recognition technology to track down a victim’s intimate photos and videos online.

Chisolm said the site, which she did not use but endorses, is designed to give a voice to victims of cyber harassment and other online crimes. And, she added, it helps victims trace content they may not know existed.

“With his app, at least with this facial recognition for some people, particularly those whose content has been imported on to a porn website, you’re able to use his app and hone in and hopefully track it down and possibly get it removed,” Chisolm said.

In Chisolm’s case, she said she reached out to GoDaddy.com, the webhosting company where the images were displayed, but the company said she had to get a court order to have them removed. Months later, she is still in court.

"If we can independently confirm a violation of our terms of service we will take action," Godaddy.com representative Nick Fully told Fox News. "However, this is not often the case, such that we rely on due process afforded by the courts to dictate the appropriate course of action."

She now travels the world giving speeches and helping other victims of revenge porn through her site, 50ShadesofSilence.com.

Many sites require the original photo in order to have it removed, making it difficult for victims to have them removed if they did not take or have access to the photo. FacePinPoint uses a profile picture that clearly shows the victims face to find the explicit content.

“FacePinPoint is the best insurance to make sure your content is not online and if it is online, then you’re going to find it before someone that you know is going to use that to jeopardize your reputation,” FacePinPoint Founder Lionel Hagege told Fox News.

Once the user's identity has been confirmed – using photos and metrics – the website uses facial recognition to search for inappropriate images.

‘When we find those naked pictures, we store the face,” Hagege said. “We store them in our database and after, as a user, you just have to visit FacePinPoint.com.”

Hagege says facial recognition is very accurate unless there is excessive weight gain or loss.

“We measure the distance between your eyes, your nose, your forehead, everything. So, basically we not looking for your face, we are looking for the measures of your face,” Hagege said. “…if it’s like a couple pounds it will work fine.”

Hagege says if there is a match, the customer will get results in their user interface and a link where they can locate the photos online.

But experts question how effective these types of technology will be given that many of these revenge porn photos are posted in subscription sites – which are difficult to track down.

Facebook is developing its own revenge porn service, which is now being tested in Australia. Google Image Search could also be used.

Archie Agarwal, CEO of ThreatModeler, a cybersecurity firm, said regardless, finding the images is easy – it's taking them down from the web that is difficult.

“In my opinion, this type of service may not be worth using because it is unclear how accurate it will be and in the end, it’s not finding the images that is the problem, it’s getting the sites to take them down,” Agarwal said.

FacePinPoint does provide a network of pro-bono lawyers and psychologists, but only in five states. They are hoping to extend this service to the one in 25 Americans who are victims of revenge porn across the US by the end of 2018.

“They need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.”

Terace Garnier is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Columbia, South Carolina. Follow her on twitter: @TeraceGarnier

Incredible 311-mph maglev train station could transform DC, would make trip to Baltimore in 15 minutes

Imagine zipping along at 311 mph on a train from Baltimore to Washington, D.C. in a mere 15 minutes or from the nation's capital to New York in one hour.

If it sounds implausible, it's not, and it could be a reality in less than 10 years.

The people behind Northeast Maglev, a team of private investors, want to connect the two cities with a 40-mile "superconducting magnetic levitation train system," known as maglev, which would be the first leg of the infrastructure to carry passengers between the two urban centers.

APPLE SUPPLIERS SUFFER AS IT STRUGGLES TO FORECAST DEMAND

In terms of stations, the District of Columbia's Mount Vernon Square is in the running for one, and either Inner Harbor or South Baltimore will likely get one. Although a third station is planned for Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport, there won't be any additional stops between the two cities.

Proponents claim the rail network would ease road congestion and revolutionize train travel in the U.S. by applying technology that's being tested in Japan, a country revered for the ease and safety of its high-speed rail system.

Unlike trains that run on regular steel railroad tracks, maglev trains "levitate" between the walls of a concrete structure called a guideway. The U-shaped guideway has walls surrounding the trains on both sides, which makes the system free from the possibility of derailment.

“This is a transformational change to this corridor, and it’s long past due,” David Henley, project director for Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail, which would develop and operate the train, told the Washington Post.

According to Amtrak, the Northeast Corridor is already home to 52 percent of the nation's worst highway bottlenecks. A study conducted by the organization predicts a 200 percent increase in delays over the next 30 years. The Northeast Maglev team's own fact sheet shows that 51 million people live in the Northeast Corridor region, responsible for 20 percent of the country's jobs — numbers that are both expected to increase.

The first stretch of the project could cost between $10 to $12 billion, the Post reports. The team of private investors and a sister company, Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail, claim to have secured financial commitments, including $5 billion from Japan.

NEO-NAZIS HAVE NO FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHT TO HARASSMENT, JUDGE RULES IN DAILY STORMER CASE

The Post reports that the two potential routes are parallel to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, and about 75 percent of the route would run about 80 to 260 feet underground.

Northeast Maglev, which is headquartered in Maryland, has a number of former politicians and executives on its advisory board, including Christine Todd Whitman, George Pataki, Ed Rendell and Tom Daschle.

The next steps include an environmental review process that won't be done until early 2020. Although tunneling could begin as early as fall of 2020, the Federal Railroad Administration could still rule against building the infrastructure.

Christopher Carbone covers technology and science for Fox News Digital. Tips or story leads: christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow @christocarbone.

Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year.

“He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone that would,” Chisolm, the founder of “50 Shades of Silence,” told Fox News.

His threats didn’t end there, she said. Chisolm, a former news anchor, became the latest victim of revenge porn. Within weeks, he began texting her lewd photos and videos he had taken of her while she was asleep. He threatened to make them public – and then followed through on his threats, creating a website full of naked images of her.

She grew frustrated because, for months, there was nothing she could do about it. A new app and search engine aims to help women like Chisolm by helping them find all their images on the web – and, in some instances, helping them pull them from the Internet.

“The quicker you can get the photos, the content, the harassing memes, whatever it is removed,” Chisolm said, “obviously, it can spread quickly so you want to move.”

“They (victims) need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.” (Fox News)

The app, FacePinPoint, launched three months ago and claims to be the first of its kind. It uses facial recognition technology to track down a victim’s intimate photos and videos online.

Chisolm said the site, which she did not use but endorses, is designed to give a voice to victims of cyber harassment and other online crimes. And, she added, it helps victims trace content they may not know existed.

“With his app, at least with this facial recognition for some people, particularly those whose content has been imported on to a porn website, you’re able to use his app and hone in and hopefully track it down and possibly get it removed,” Chisolm said.

In Chisolm’s case, she said she reached out to GoDaddy.com, the webhosting company where the images were displayed, but the company said she had to get a court order to have them removed. Months later, she is still in court.

"If we can independently confirm a violation of our terms of service we will take action," Godaddy.com representative Nick Fully told Fox News. "However, this is not often the case, such that we rely on due process afforded by the courts to dictate the appropriate course of action."

She now travels the world giving speeches and helping other victims of revenge porn through her site, 50ShadesofSilence.com.

Many sites require the original photo in order to have it removed, making it difficult for victims to have them removed if they did not take or have access to the photo. FacePinPoint uses a profile picture that clearly shows the victims face to find the explicit content.

“FacePinPoint is the best insurance to make sure your content is not online and if it is online, then you’re going to find it before someone that you know is going to use that to jeopardize your reputation,” FacePinPoint Founder Lionel Hagege told Fox News.

Once the user's identity has been confirmed – using photos and metrics – the website uses facial recognition to search for inappropriate images.

‘When we find those naked pictures, we store the face,” Hagege said. “We store them in our database and after, as a user, you just have to visit FacePinPoint.com.”

Hagege says facial recognition is very accurate unless there is excessive weight gain or loss.

“We measure the distance between your eyes, your nose, your forehead, everything. So, basically we not looking for your face, we are looking for the measures of your face,” Hagege said. “…if it’s like a couple pounds it will work fine.”

Hagege says if there is a match, the customer will get results in their user interface and a link where they can locate the photos online.

But experts question how effective these types of technology will be given that many of these revenge porn photos are posted in subscription sites – which are difficult to track down.

Facebook is developing its own revenge porn service, which is now being tested in Australia. Google Image Search could also be used.

Archie Agarwal, CEO of ThreatModeler, a cybersecurity firm, said regardless, finding the images is easy – it's taking them down from the web that is difficult.

“In my opinion, this type of service may not be worth using because it is unclear how accurate it will be and in the end, it’s not finding the images that is the problem, it’s getting the sites to take them down,” Agarwal said.

FacePinPoint does provide a network of pro-bono lawyers and psychologists, but only in five states. They are hoping to extend this service to the one in 25 Americans who are victims of revenge porn across the US by the end of 2018.

“They need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.”

Terace Garnier is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Columbia, South Carolina. Follow her on twitter: @TeraceGarnier

Incredible 311-mph maglev train station could transform DC, would make trip to Baltimore in 15 minutes

Imagine zipping along at 311 mph on a train from Baltimore to Washington, D.C. in a mere 15 minutes or from the nation's capital to New York in one hour.

If it sounds implausible, it's not, and it could be a reality in less than 10 years.

The people behind Northeast Maglev, a team of private investors, want to connect the two cities with a 40-mile "superconducting magnetic levitation train system," known as maglev, which would be the first leg of the infrastructure to carry passengers between the two urban centers.

APPLE SUPPLIERS SUFFER AS IT STRUGGLES TO FORECAST DEMAND

In terms of stations, the District of Columbia's Mount Vernon Square is in the running for one, and either Inner Harbor or South Baltimore will likely get one. Although a third station is planned for Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport, there won't be any additional stops between the two cities.

Proponents claim the rail network would ease road congestion and revolutionize train travel in the U.S. by applying technology that's being tested in Japan, a country revered for the ease and safety of its high-speed rail system.

Unlike trains that run on regular steel railroad tracks, maglev trains "levitate" between the walls of a concrete structure called a guideway. The U-shaped guideway has walls surrounding the trains on both sides, which makes the system free from the possibility of derailment.

“This is a transformational change to this corridor, and it’s long past due,” David Henley, project director for Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail, which would develop and operate the train, told the Washington Post.

According to Amtrak, the Northeast Corridor is already home to 52 percent of the nation's worst highway bottlenecks. A study conducted by the organization predicts a 200 percent increase in delays over the next 30 years. The Northeast Maglev team's own fact sheet shows that 51 million people live in the Northeast Corridor region, responsible for 20 percent of the country's jobs — numbers that are both expected to increase.

The first stretch of the project could cost between $10 to $12 billion, the Post reports. The team of private investors and a sister company, Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail, claim to have secured financial commitments, including $5 billion from Japan.

NEO-NAZIS HAVE NO FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHT TO HARASSMENT, JUDGE RULES IN DAILY STORMER CASE

The Post reports that the two potential routes are parallel to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, and about 75 percent of the route would run about 80 to 260 feet underground.

Northeast Maglev, which is headquartered in Maryland, has a number of former politicians and executives on its advisory board, including Christine Todd Whitman, George Pataki, Ed Rendell and Tom Daschle.

The next steps include an environmental review process that won't be done until early 2020. Although tunneling could begin as early as fall of 2020, the Federal Railroad Administration could still rule against building the infrastructure.

Christopher Carbone covers technology and science for Fox News Digital. Tips or story leads: christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow @christocarbone.

Incredible 311-mph maglev train station could transform DC, would make trip to Baltimore in 15 minutes

Imagine zipping along at 311 mph on a train from Baltimore to Washington, D.C. in a mere 15 minutes or from the nation's capital to New York in one hour.

If it sounds implausible, it's not, and it could be a reality in less than 10 years.

The people behind Northeast Maglev, a team of private investors, want to connect the two cities with a 40-mile "superconducting magnetic levitation train system," known as maglev, which would be the first leg of the infrastructure to carry passengers between the two urban centers.

APPLE SUPPLIERS SUFFER AS IT STRUGGLES TO FORECAST DEMAND

In terms of stations, the District of Columbia's Mount Vernon Square is in the running for one, and either Inner Harbor or South Baltimore will likely get one. Although a third station is planned for Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport, there won't be any additional stops between the two cities.

Proponents claim the rail network would ease road congestion and revolutionize train travel in the U.S. by applying technology that's being tested in Japan, a country revered for the ease and safety of its high-speed rail system.

Unlike trains that run on regular steel railroad tracks, maglev trains "levitate" between the walls of a concrete structure called a guideway. The U-shaped guideway has walls surrounding the trains on both sides, which makes the system free from the possibility of derailment.

“This is a transformational change to this corridor, and it’s long past due,” David Henley, project director for Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail, which would develop and operate the train, told the Washington Post.

According to Amtrak, the Northeast Corridor is already home to 52 percent of the nation's worst highway bottlenecks. A study conducted by the organization predicts a 200 percent increase in delays over the next 30 years. The Northeast Maglev team's own fact sheet shows that 51 million people live in the Northeast Corridor region, responsible for 20 percent of the country's jobs — numbers that are both expected to increase.

The first stretch of the project could cost between $10 to $12 billion, the Post reports. The team of private investors and a sister company, Baltimore-Washington Rapid Rail, claim to have secured financial commitments, including $5 billion from Japan.

NEO-NAZIS HAVE NO FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHT TO HARASSMENT, JUDGE RULES IN DAILY STORMER CASE

The Post reports that the two potential routes are parallel to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, and about 75 percent of the route would run about 80 to 260 feet underground.

Northeast Maglev, which is headquartered in Maryland, has a number of former politicians and executives on its advisory board, including Christine Todd Whitman, George Pataki, Ed Rendell and Tom Daschle.

The next steps include an environmental review process that won't be done until early 2020. Although tunneling could begin as early as fall of 2020, the Federal Railroad Administration could still rule against building the infrastructure.

Christopher Carbone covers technology and science for Fox News Digital. Tips or story leads: christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow @christocarbone.

Tech company using facial recognition technology to combat revenge porn

Darieth Chisolm was moving on from a year-long relationship when she got a chilling message from her ex last year.

“He said to me: ‘I will shoot you in your head and stab you in your heart if I don’t come back to the relationship. And if he wouldn’t do it he would find someone that would,” Chisolm, the founder of “50 Shades of Silence,” told Fox News.

His threats didn’t end there, she said. Chisolm, a former news anchor, became the latest victim of revenge porn. Within weeks, he began texting her lewd photos and videos he had taken of her while she was asleep. He threatened to make them public – and then followed through on his threats, creating a website full of naked images of her.

She grew frustrated because, for months, there was nothing she could do about it. A new app and search engine aims to help women like Chisolm by helping them find all their images on the web – and, in some instances, helping them pull them from the Internet.

“The quicker you can get the photos, the content, the harassing memes, whatever it is removed,” Chisolm said, “obviously, it can spread quickly so you want to move.”

“They (victims) need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.” (Fox News)

The app, FacePinPoint, launched three months ago and claims to be the first of its kind. It uses facial recognition technology to track down a victim’s intimate photos and videos online.

Chisolm said the site, which she did not use but endorses, is designed to give a voice to victims of cyber harassment and other online crimes. And, she added, it helps victims trace content they may not know existed.

“With his app, at least with this facial recognition for some people, particularly those whose content has been imported on to a porn website, you’re able to use his app and hone in and hopefully track it down and possibly get it removed,” Chisolm said.

In Chisolm’s case, she said she reached out to GoDaddy.com, the webhosting company where the images were displayed, but the company said she had to get a court order to have them removed. Months later, she is still in court.

"If we can independently confirm a violation of our terms of service we will take action," Godaddy.com representative Nick Fully told Fox News. "However, this is not often the case, such that we rely on due process afforded by the courts to dictate the appropriate course of action."

She now travels the world giving speeches and helping other victims of revenge porn through her site, 50ShadesofSilence.com.

Many sites require the original photo in order to have it removed, making it difficult for victims to have them removed if they did not take or have access to the photo. FacePinPoint uses a profile picture that clearly shows the victims face to find the explicit content.

“FacePinPoint is the best insurance to make sure your content is not online and if it is online, then you’re going to find it before someone that you know is going to use that to jeopardize your reputation,” FacePinPoint Founder Lionel Hagege told Fox News.

Once the user's identity has been confirmed – using photos and metrics – the website uses facial recognition to search for inappropriate images.

‘When we find those naked pictures, we store the face,” Hagege said. “We store them in our database and after, as a user, you just have to visit FacePinPoint.com.”

Hagege says facial recognition is very accurate unless there is excessive weight gain or loss.

“We measure the distance between your eyes, your nose, your forehead, everything. So, basically we not looking for your face, we are looking for the measures of your face,” Hagege said. “…if it’s like a couple pounds it will work fine.”

Hagege says if there is a match, the customer will get results in their user interface and a link where they can locate the photos online.

But experts question how effective these types of technology will be given that many of these revenge porn photos are posted in subscription sites – which are difficult to track down.

Facebook is developing its own revenge porn service, which is now being tested in Australia. Google Image Search could also be used.

Archie Agarwal, CEO of ThreatModeler, a cybersecurity firm, said regardless, finding the images is easy – it's taking them down from the web that is difficult.

“In my opinion, this type of service may not be worth using because it is unclear how accurate it will be and in the end, it’s not finding the images that is the problem, it’s getting the sites to take them down,” Agarwal said.

FacePinPoint does provide a network of pro-bono lawyers and psychologists, but only in five states. They are hoping to extend this service to the one in 25 Americans who are victims of revenge porn across the US by the end of 2018.

“They need to be heard,” Hagege said. “They need to get the justice they deserve.”

Terace Garnier is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in Columbia, South Carolina. Follow her on twitter: @TeraceGarnier