Threesome twist revealed during testimony in Denise Williams murder trial

The murder trial against Denise Williams – who allegedly helped stage her husband’s death as a boating mishap – revealed a twisted web of extramarital affairs that included threesomes, according to court testimony. Denise Williams, 48, faced the second day of testimony Wednesday in her trial for allegedly conspiring to kill her 31-year-old spouse, Mike Williams, who … Continue reading “Threesome twist revealed during testimony in Denise Williams murder trial”

The murder trial against Denise Williams – who allegedly helped stage her husband’s death as a boating mishap – revealed a twisted web of extramarital affairs that included threesomes, according to court testimony.

Denise Williams, 48, faced the second day of testimony Wednesday in her trial for allegedly conspiring to kill her 31-year-old spouse, Mike Williams, who vanished in December 2000 on a duck hunting trip at Lake Seminole in Florida.

Prosecutors allege Denise was involved in an affair with Mike’s best friend, Brian Winchester, and they plotted to kill her husband so they could be together.

The pair is accused of staging Mike’s disappearance and collecting on his $1.75 million life insurance.

Mike, Denise and Winchester were close friends and attended North Florida Christian School together, along with Winchester’s wife, Kathy Thomas, according to officials.

FLORIDA WOMAN ACCUSED OF PLOTTING HUSBAND'S DEATH, MARRYING KILLER STANDS TRIAL

Both couples were high school sweethearts and would go on double-dates – even after they each married in 1994 and had children.

But court testimony revealed Wednesday that the relationships between all four became more tangled over the years.

TEEN PLEADS GUILTY TO MURDERING FATHER, 6-YEAR-OLD BOY

Scandalous photos of Denise and Kathy were shown to jurors Wednesday from when the two women went on spring break with Winchester to Panama City Beach.

Click to read more from The New York Post.

El Chapo’s beauty queen wife disses media’s ‘unfair’ caricature of her drug-lord husband in rare interview

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the 29-year-old wife of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán and the mother of their twin 7-year-old daughters, claimed in a rare interview that the media have given her husband a bad rap: she said he’s normal and ordinary, and not an infamous horror media fabrication.

“They don’t want to bring him down from the pedestal to make him more like he is, a normal, ordinary person,” the former beauty queen told the Spanish-language network Telemundo about the media’s “unfair” portrayal of “El Chapo.” The interview aired Monday evening; it was unclear where it took place.

“I think he did like it, he does like it a little,” Aispuro added about the media attention’s effect on her 61-year-old husband who has been on trial in federal court in Brooklyn since Nov. 13.

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Aispuro has been dubbed the Kim Kardashian doppelgänger of Mexico — a beauty queen fond of flaunting her designer dresses, oversized sunglasses and bikini body for a growing flock of followers across social media.

CRUELTY OF EL CHAPO'S SINALOA CARTEL KNOWS NO BOUNDS

The notorious drug lord has been denied contact with his wife as a security measure since being brought to New York City to face drug conspiracy charges.

During the trial, witnesses have described how her husband used tunnels dug under the border and fake jalapeno cans to smuggle tons of cocaine into the United States during the 1990s and early 2000s.

The Sinaloa cartel, sometimes referred to by insiders as "The Federation," made hundreds of millions of dollars, most of it in U.S. currency collected in such volume it had to be stashed in safe houses while the gang figured out what to do with it. Guzmán spent some of it on a private zoo, a diamond-encrusted pistol and paying off police and politicians.

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Aispuro has been trying to humanize her husband who allegedly runs the multibillion-dollar cartel that continues to operate from Mexico and throughout the United States.

“That’s what he really wants,” she added to Telemundo. “For everyone to realize how things really are and see it all from another perspective. More than anything, I think that’s what he wants. Just tell it like it is.”

EL CHAPO'S SINALOA CARTEL DOES HUGE U.S. BUSINESS

She said she is happy to stand by her man during his trial, and she told Telemundo she is looking forward to the future.

“I don’t dream of big things,” Aispuro said. “Tranquility, happiness, nothing out of the ordinary.”

Fox News’ Hollie McKay and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Florida woman accused of plotting husband’s death, marrying killer stands trial

The trial of a Florida woman accused of plotting the murder of her husband in 2000 and marrying his killer, with whom she was said to be having an affair, began Tuesday.

Denise Williams, 48, is facing a first-degree murder charge in the suspicious death of her husband, Mike Williams, who had disappeared while duck hunting on a large lake near Tallahassee nearly 20 years ago. Investigators said they initially believed he fell from his boat and alligators ate him.

However, years later his best friend and insurance agent, Brian Winchester, confessed to the killing, adding that Williams’ wife was in on it. Investigators ultimately concluded the man had died from a shotgun blast to the head and had been buried near the lake.

A grand jury indictment released Wednesday accuses Denise Williams of conspiring with Brian Winchester, seen here, for more than nine months in order to kill Mike Williams. (Leon County Clerk of Court via Tallahassee Democrat)

Winchester testified Tuesday about his relationship with Denise Williams. He claimed Mike Williams apparently was growing suspicious about her activities. Winchester said that suspicion and the fact that one of Mike Williams' insurance policies was about to lapse led him and Denise to kill him. "We knew our window of opportunity was closing," Winchester testified.

Philip Padovano, one of the attorneys representing Denise Williams, said there was no proof his client was having an affair with Winchester or had helped plot the killing. "There's no tangible evidence or physical evidence to connect Denise Williams to this crime."

Winchester said he had intended to drown Mike Williams by pushing him from his canoe, but panicked when he saw Williams struggling in the water to get out of his jacket and duck waders and shot him. He said he dragged Williams' body back to shore, put him in his truck and buried him hours later.

SUSPECT ACCUSED OF SHOOTING 3 TEXAS OFFICERS IS FOUND DEAD

At the time of his death, Williams had three life insurance policies worth $1.75 million. Denise Williams initially petitioned to have him declared dead due to accidental drowning because crews hadn't found the body. She married Winchester in December 2005, but the relationship soured and they divorced in 2016.

Last year, Winchester pleaded no contest to kidnapping his ex-wife at gunpoint, and was sentenced to 20 years in prison. The very next day, officials announced that Mike Williams' remains were found at the end of a dead-end road after they received "new information." The body had been discovered two months earlier, but the state's Department of Law Enforcement needed to confirm through DNA tests that it actually was Williams.

JURY RECOMMENDS LIVE IN PRISON FOR JAMES FIELDS JR.

The woman’s defense team told the jury: "You will have to rely on the word of a murderer and a convicted felon."

She also faces charges including conspiracy to commit murder and accessory after the fact.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Paulina Dedaj is a writer/ reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter @PaulinaDedaj.

James Fields guilty of first-degree murder in Charlottesville car attack at white nationalist rally

Just over a year after he plowed his vehicle into a crowd protesting a white nationalist rally, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer, James Alex Fields Jr. was convicted Friday of first-degree murder and other felonies – and now faces the possibility of life in prison.

A jury needed a little more than seven hours to convict Fields, of Maumee, Ohio, in the killing of Heyer during a “Unite the Right” rally in Virginia on Aug. 12, 2017.

He was also found guilty of five counts of aggravated malicious wounding, three counts of malicious wounding and a count of leaving the scene of an accident. Fields faces life in prison.

During closing arguments Thursday, prosecutor Nina-Alice Antony portrayed Fields as a hateful young man who idled his vehicle for more than a minute before backing up and then speeding into the crowd, killing Heyer and injuring dozens of other people.

Video from a Virginia State Police helicopter captured the incident, showing a grey muscle car as it rammed the group and then drove away.

Antony also referenced a text message sent by Fields the day before the rally after his mother told him to be careful.

In the text, accompanied by a picture of Adolf Hitler, Fields wrote: “we’re not the one (sic) who need to be careful.”

Antony also repeatedly reminded jurors about a meme Fields posted on Instagram three months before the crash. The image showed a crowd, identified as “protesters,” being rammed by a car, and depicted bodies being tossed in the air.

"What we have is a man who had a decision, and he decides to turn his Instagram post into reality," she said.

Defense attorney Denise Lunsford urged the jury to consider the chaos of the day, including the use of tear gas and a series of street fights between white nationalists, Antifa activists and counter-protesters.

Lunsford said Fields only drove into the crowd out of fear after finding himself alone and unprotected.

“Look at the circumstances as they appeared to him,” Lunsford said. “He says he felt he was in danger, there were people coming at him.”

On Thursday, she urged the jury to find Fields guilty of “no more than” the lesser charges of manslaughter in Heyer’s death and unlawful wounding for the injuries to others.

The “Unite the Right” rally was organized to protest plans to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Lucia I. Suarez Sang is a Reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

Border Patrol agent won’t be tried a third time in teen’s death

PHOENIX – Federal prosecutors on Thursday said they would not pursue another trial against a Border Patrol agent who fatally shot a Mexican teenager across a border fence but who was twice acquitted.

A filing in court shows prosecutors say they will no longer pursue the case against Lonnie Swartz, the agent who killed 16-year-old Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez in October 2012.

"Agent Swartz is relieved and looking forward to moving on with his life without the threat of criminal prosecution hanging over his head," his attorney, Sean Chapman, said in an email to The Associated Press.

In April, Swartz was acquitted of second-degree murder, but a jury deadlocked on manslaughter charges. Prosecutors re-tried Swartz on voluntary and involuntary manslaughter charges.

They said Swartz lost his cool when he became frustrated at rock-throwers from the Mexican side of the border while on the job.

The second trial, which began in October, ended with a not guilty verdict on the involuntary charge, but the jury again deadlocked on voluntary manslaughter.

Swartz was the rare agent who was prosecuted for use of force. The shooting, and his indictment three years later, came at a time when the Border Patrol was increasingly under scrutiny for its use of force, especially pertaining to rock-throwers, or people on the Mexican side of the border who throw rocks to distract agents.

Swartz's attorney said he was acting in self-defense and following Border Patrol policy when he fired at least 16 shots at Elena Rodriguez through the slats of a border fence dividing Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Sonora.

Prosecutors said Elena Rodriguez was throwing rocks at Swartz and other law enforcement officers who were on scene chasing a suspected drug smuggler in an effort to distract them.

The boy's family still denies that he was involved. They say his killing was not justified.

The announcement on Nov. 21 that the jury had found Swartz not guilty on involuntary manslaughter but had deadlocked on voluntary manslaughter was met with protests from activists who marched through downtown and shut down a busy intersection.

Jury to deliberate on murder charge in Charlottesville, Virginia, car ramming

A Virginia jury is poised to begin deliberations on Friday in the trial of an Ohio man accused of driving his car into a group of counterprotesters at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville in August 2017, killing one woman and injuring dozens.

The man, James Alex Fields Jr., is accused of first-degree murder and other felonies in connection with the crash, which came after police forced crowds at the rally to disband. That decision following clashes between white nationalists who came to the town to protest plans to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, and counterdemonstrators who showed up to oppose the white nationalists.

Prosecutor Nina-Alice Antony portrayed Fields to the jury as a hateful young man who idled in his car for more than a minute before backing up and then speeding into the crowd. She referenced a text message sent by Fields the day before the rally in response to his mother's plea for him to be careful. Fields wrote that 'we're not the one (sic) who need to be careful," accompanied by a picture of Adolf Hitler.

Antony also repeatedly reminded the jurors about a meme Fields posted on Instagram three months before the crash. The image shows bodies tossed into the air after a car plows into a crowd identified as "protesters."

Women sit by an impromptu memorial to victims of the Charlottesville car attack. (REUTERS)

"What we have is a man who had a decision, and he decides to turn his Instagram post into reality," she said.

Defense attorney Denise Lunsford said Fields drove into the crowd out of fear after finding himself alone and unprotected as he attempted to leave town. She said he saw a large crowd down the street surrounding two other cars and feared he would be attacked.

"Look at the circumstances as they appeared to him," Lunsford said. "He says he felt he was in danger, there were people coming at him."

Lunsford said Fields had urine thrown at him and had been yelled at by counterprotesters during a chaotic day that saw street fights break out between the two groups while authorities used tear gas in a bid to disperse them.

The crash killed 32-year-old Heather Heyer, a paralegal and activist. In addition to murder, Fields faces five counts of aggravated malicious wounding, three counts of malicious wounding and a count of leaving the scene of an accident.

Heather Heyer, who was killed when Fields drove his car into the crowd.

Lunsford urged the jury to find Fields guilty of "no more than" the lesser charges of manslaughter in Heyer's death and unlawful wounding for the injuries to others.

In testimony earlier Thursday, a man who was with Fields shortly before the crash said he appeared calm and "maybe a little bit scared."

Joshua Matthews said he met Fields in a Charlottesville park where white nationalists had gathered. After police declared an "unlawful assembly," Fields, Matthews and two other people decided to walk together "as it would probably be more safe," Matthews said.

He said while they were walking, a group of "antifas" — short for anti-fascists — yelled at them. He said Fields yelled something back, although he said he couldn't remember what Fields said.

The defense also called to the stand a left-wing defense group member who claimed in an earlier social media post that he had scared Fields away from a park where counterprotesters had gathered about an hour before the vehicle mayhem unfolded.

Dwayne Dixon testified that he saw a gray "muscle car" drive by several times. He said he yelled "Get the (expletive) out of here" at the car while wearing his gun slung over his shoulder. He testified that he could not see the driver because the car had tinted windows. Dixon has claimed previously that he used his gun to scare off a man he believes was Fields.

Dixon said he believes that was about 30 minutes to an hour before the car surged into the crowd..

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

California mom who drowned baby in tub found insane, spared prison

A California woman who was convicted twice of drowning her infant daughter in a bathtub was legally insane at the time of the murder, a jury said, sparing the mother prison time.

Lucero Carrera, 33, was determined to be not sane when she killed her 2-month-old daughter, Kimberly, in June 2012 while living with her mom and the child in Santa Ana, the OC Register reported. Carrera, who has a history of mental illness, will not spend time in prison for the murder.

Carrera drowned her daughter in a bathtub while her mother was out of the house. Prior to the killing, Carrera had stopped taking her medication because she was worried the drowsy side effect was preventing her from caring for her daughter, a courtroom testimony stated.

In 2015, a jury determined Carrera was sane at the time of the murder and found her guilty for the killing. She was sentenced to 25 years in prison, but was it was overturned on appeal.

Although a second jury found Carrera guilty of murder earlier this year, a judge declared a mistrial because jurors could not agree if the 33-year-old was sane when she killed her daughter.

A third jury was selected to only focus on the trial’s sanity phase.

Carrera is expected to appear back in court Dec. 19.

Katherine Lam is a breaking and trending news digital producer for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter at @bykatherinelam

Ex-deputy of El Chapo reveals how reputed drug kingpin repeatedly tried to have him killed

A top lieutenant in a powerful Mexican drug cartel during the 1990s claims he survived four attempts on his life ordered by his boss, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

Miguel Angel Martinez appeared in court for a second day on Wednesday as a prosecution witness in a drug conspiracy case against Guzman.

On the stand, Martinez said he never gave Guzman reason to want him dead. He described himself as loyal to the reputed drug lord, helping him arrange massive shipments of cocaine that earned his boss millions. Martinez said the two became so close, he was asked to be the godfather to Guzman’s son.

"I never failed him. I never stole from him. I watched over his family," he said. "And the only thing I ever received from him was four attacks against me."

Martinez said it was after his own arrest in the early 1990s when the attempts on his life began.

EL CHAPO’S LAVISH, JET-SETTING LIFESTYLE REVEALED IN COURT

When he was first arrested and sent to a jail in Mexico City, Martinez said, he was cornered in his own jail cell by other inmates and stabbed 15 times.

After returning from the hospital he was again sent back to the same cell with the same inmates, where he said a second stabbing attack took place.

At night, "I actually heard them polishing their knives, their blades," he said.

He survived three stabbing attacks before being transferred to another jail, where he said he learned that anyone who successfully killed him would receive money from the cartel.

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The final and most dramatic attempt on his life, he said, came one morning when a man armed with a pistol and a grenade tried to force himself into Martinez's cell. He struggled with a guard but managed to toss the grenade into the cell.

Martinez, who survived, was eventually extradited to the U.S., where he pleaded guilty to drug charges and began cooperating in other U.S. drug-smuggling cases to a degree that earned him a reduced sentence, cash payments and entry into a witness protection program, he said.

The testimony came in the third week of a trial at a New York City courthouse,where Guzman has pleaded not guilty to trafficking charges that could land him in a U.S. prison for life if he is convicted. His defense says he is being framed by Martinez and other cooperators.

Paulina Dedaj is a writer/ reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter @PaulinaDedaj.

El Chapo’s beauty queen wife caught with phone, had ‘impermissible contact’ with drug lord, prosecutors say

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman’s wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, was caught with a cellphone in court last week and had “unauthorized” and “impermissible contact” with the notorious drug lord, prosecutors said in a request for sanctions against the defense counsel.

In heavily redacted court papers released Tuesday, prosecutors said El Chapo’s beauty queen wife had a cellphone that’s banned from the courthouse. Surveillance video from Nov. 19 showed Coronel had a cellphone in court.

Prosecutors also claimed Coronel was spotted using a cellphone during two separate occasions that led to “impermissible contact” between she and Guzman.

HAS BIBLE-CARRYING EL CHAPO REALLY FOUND GOD? SKEPTICS AREN'T BUYING IT

“Based on the facts detailed herein [redacted], appear to have used cellular telephones in concert with an attorney visit to the defendant following two trial days last week to facilitate unauthorized and, under the SAMs, impermissible contact between the defendant and Ms. Coronel,” the court papers stated.

Visitors are banned from bringing cellphones, cameras or any recording devices into the courthouse due to strict security measures implemented during the high-profile trial.

Authorities escort Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, center, from a plane to a waiting caravan of SUVs at Long Island MacArthur Airport, in Ronkonkoma, N.Y. (AP)

Federal authorities have imposed tight security measures throughout Guzman's proceedings. Tuesday's court filings referred to a "determination by the Attorney General that communications and contacts between the defendant and other persons could result in death or serious bodily injury to others."

CHAPO'S BEAUTY QUEEN WIFE LIVING LAVISHLY – AWAY FROM THE COURTROOM

Guzman has been denied contact with his wife as a security measure since being brought to New York City to face drug conspiracy charges. A judge also ruled Guzman could not hug his wife before the trial due to security risks.

The trial, in its third week, resumed Tuesday with testimony from Guzman’s former aide Miguel Martinez, who said earlier the cartel leader orchestrated massive cocaine shipments that made him so rich he could pay multimillion-dollar bribes to a powerful police commander.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Katherine Lam is a breaking and trending news digital producer for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter at @bykatherinelam

El Chapo’s lavish, jet-setting lifestyle revealed in court

A private zoo with exotic animals, four private planes and trips to Switzerland for anti-aging treatments – all part of the lavish lifestyle of Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman during the early 1990’s “cocaine boom,” according to testimony from a onetime close friend and top assistant.

A top lieutenant of the Sinaloa cartel from 1986 to 1998, Miguel Angel Martinez testified in federal court on Tuesday against his former boss who was brought to New York City to face drug conspiracy charges.

Martinez called the business “the best thing in the world” in the early 1990s as the cartel was a vital part of the “cocaine boom” and as a result, they “made a lot of money.”

He recalled receiving payments of up to $10 million every month by means of private jets. He said they stashed the cash wherever they could find the space for it.

Martinez testified that El Chapo had acquired four jets, a $10 million beach house in Acapulco (among many others), “ranches in every state,” and traveled all over the world at the height of the drug-business boom.

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Guzman also allegedly had his own private zoo that held lions, panthers, tigers and deer — and included a small train on which visitors could travel across the grounds.

El Chapo was said to have his own yacht and even gifted his employees with cars.

Over time, the kingpin who grew up in poverty developed a taste for world travel, he said. His entourage visited Macau to gamble and Switzerland so he could get a "cellular youth treatment," he said.

The former lieutenant also recalled in court having to pay for El Chapo's multiple wives. Emma Coronel Aispuro, who married the drug kingpin in 2007, was said to be looking down during this portion of the testimony.

CHAPO'S BEAUTY QUEEN WIFE LIVING LAVISHLY – AWAY FROM THE COURTROOM

Martinez described how the Sinaloa cartel was smuggling tons of cocaine into the United States — through tunnels dug under the border, in tanker trucks with secret compartments, even in fake chili pepper cans. What came back in the other direction, he said, was tens of millions of dollars in cash.

Much of it ended up in Tijuana, where Guzman would send his three private jets each month to pick it up, Martinez said. On average, each plane would carry up to $10 million, he said.

CARAVAN MIGRANTS ACCUSE U.S. BORDER PATROL OF 'REPRESSION' BY USING TEAR GAS

Guzman was extradited to the U.S. last year from Mexico. He has pleaded not guilty to drug-trafficking charges, with his lawyers claiming he's being framed by shady cooperators.

In opening statements, a defense attorney suggested Martinez couldn't be trusted as a witness, saying he had such a severe cocaine habit while he was working for Guzman that it damaged his nose. He admitted Tuesday that "unfortunately" he was using up to 4 grams of coke each day at the time, but hadn't touched it for 20 years.

Fox News Tamara Gitt and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Paulina Dedaj is a writer/ reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter @PaulinaDedaj.