The United Nation’s anti-Israel bias is undeniable — Let’s stop pretending otherwise

“Everyone,” the late New York senator and diplomat Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously said, “is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” However, some journalists seem too willing to conflate the two – and too willing to ignore reality when it’s staring them in the face. Media coverage of the United Nation’s anti-Israel … Continue reading “The United Nation’s anti-Israel bias is undeniable — Let’s stop pretending otherwise”

“Everyone,” the late New York senator and diplomat Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously said, “is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” However, some journalists seem too willing to conflate the two – and too willing to ignore reality when it’s staring them in the face. Media coverage of the United Nation’s anti-Israel animus proves this point.

On Dec. 6, 2018 the United Nations General Assembly failed to pass a resolution condemning Hamas, the U.S.-designated terrorist group that rules the Gaza Strip. Hamas’s charter approvingly cites Adolf Hitler and calls for Israel’s destruction and the genocide of Jews. After extensive pro-Hamas lobbying by the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) – itself a former U.S.-designated terror group with American and Israeli blood on its hands – the resolution condemning the Gazan terror group “for repeatedly firing rockets into Israel and for inciting violence, thereby putting civilians at risk,” failed.

The resolution, entitled “Activities of Hamas and Other Militant Groups in Gaza,” actually received a majority of the votes. But thanks to a preceding measure requiring a two-thirds majority, it fell short.

The U.N., of course, was founded due to a Nazi war of aggression that had the elimination of world Jewry as a chief objective. Yet, today’s U.N. attacks the Jewish state ad nauseam. And it’s not an opinion to say as much – it’s a fact. But some press outlets pretend otherwise.

For example, The Washington Post’s report on the General Assembly vote described the U.N’s “anti-Israel bias” as merely “perceived.” And The Post, among other newspapers, has often minimized the U.N.’s institutional mistreatment of Israel by presenting it as merely a claim by “Israel and its supporters.” But in this case perception is reality, and the numbers say as much.

In 2018, the U.N. General Assembly passed 21 resolutions condemning Israel, and a mere six for the rest of the world, according to U.N. Watch, a Geneva-based NGO that monitors the international body. Israel, a democracy, was condemned seven times more than the brutal North Korean dictatorship, which still runs gulags and was the subject of a mere 3 resolutions. Indeed, just on Nov. 15, 2018 the General Assembly adopted nine resolutions against Israel – all while ignoring human rights situations in China, Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, Cuba, Turkey and Pakistan, for example.

One of those resolutions even condemned Israel for “repressive measures” against the Syrian people, although the U.N. itself has largely failed to condemn or punish Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad for murdering his own people en masse.

As the author Eric Rozenman ably documents in his 2018 book “Jews Make the Best Demons” about modern antisemitism: “Turtle bay’s font of Israel-hatred and Jew-hatred – not to mention historical revisionism – overflows.”

Indeed, as the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America (CAMERA) documented in a Nov. 9, 2018 Jerusalem Post Op-Ed, the U.N. has created an “institutional infrastructure” for the sole purpose of attacking the Jewish state.

Most infamously, on Nov. 10, 1975 the U.N. General Assembly passed Resolution 3379, which equated Zionism – the belief in Jewish self-determination – with racism. Although the resolution was, with considerable U.S. effort, repealed in 1991, the international body had also voted to create the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (CEIRPP), which works feverishly to delegitimize Israel.

CEIRPP organizes conferences and disseminates information, spreading “one-sided propaganda consistent with the most extreme Palestinian positions,” according to Gil Kapen, a special adviser to the American Jewish International Relations Institute (AJIRI). It was at CEIRPP’s invite that then-CNN contributor Marc Lamont Hill called for Israel’s elimination in a prepared statement on Nov. 28, 2018.

The U.N. has even created two different agencies for dealing with refugees – one of which, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), is exclusively for Palestinians. All other refugee populations in the world fall under the jurisdiction of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), which, despite dealing with six times as many refugees as UNRWA, has only a quarter of the staff.

UNRWA not only has a separate definition of “refugee” just for Palestinians (which includes people who are generations removed from the conflict and people who are citizens of other nations) but the organization has, on several occasions, been caught employing Hamas operatives. A 2015 internal investigation found that UNRWA schools were used by Hamas to “hide weapons” and “launch attacks” during the 2014 Israel-Hamas War. Employees of the U.N. entity have also been caught praising Hitler and calling for Israel’s destruction.

Another agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), has sought to strip Jewish holy sites in Israel of their Jewish identity by declaring them “occupied” and denying their history.

On several occasions, the U.N. has commissioned several “reports” to blame Israel for the actions of terror groups, and unashamedly hired anti-Israel activists to author them.

The U.N. has abetted Israel’s enemies in other ways.

Hezbollah, the Iranian-backed, Lebanese-based terror group, was recently caught digging attack tunnels into Israel. The United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), which is tasked with preventing such occurrences, not only failed to detect the tunnels (which were years in the making); they have turned a “blind eye” and become an “accessory to Hezbollah’s ambitions,” according to a recent Op-Ed by retired Israel Defense Forces Brig. Gen. Assaf Orion.

Similarly, in 1967, Egypt’s then-ruler, Gamal Abdel Nassar, requested that the U.N. remove a peacekeeping force on the Israel-Egypt armistice line. Nasser was obviously planning to attack the Jewish state. Yet the U.N. complied, helping to precipitate the war that followed.

The U.N.’s anti-Israel history is both long and undeniable. And journalists shouldn’t pretend otherwise. As Winston Churchill – himself a former journalist – famously observed, “The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is.”

Sean Durns is a senior research analyst for the Washington D.C. office of CAMERA, the 65,000-member, Boston-based Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America.

Pompeo calls for international coalition against Iran, as Europe ramps up pressure

UNITED NATIONS — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Wednesday he wants to build a “coalition of responsible nations” to push back against malign Iranian actions — as European countries took to the U.N. Security Council to ramp up pressure on the regime.

“The United States will continue to unite sovereign nations in their responsibility to work for the peace and security of their own people and a stable international order,” he said at a meeting of the council on non-proliferation. “The United States will continue to be relentless in building a coalition of responsible nations who are serious about confronting the Iranian regime’s reckless ballistic missile activity.”

He warned nations of allowing the Islamic regime to flout the Iran nuclear deal, and called on the Security Council to “get serious” about pushing back on the regime.

“Iran has exploited the goodwill of nations and defied multiple Security Council Resolutions in its quest for a robust ballistic missile force,” he told the Council. “The United States will never stand for this.”

The meeting comes after Tehran tested a medium-range ballistic missile earlier this month — a move that Pompeo has said is in violation of Security Council Resolution 2231, the document that enshrined the 2015 Iran deal, called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA), negotiated under the Obama administration.

Pompeo has cited the activities of Iran as proof that the deal is not working.

EUROPEANS FUME OVER TEHRAN MISSILE TEST

“If you’re looking for a failed agreement, I’ve got a good one for you,” he told reporters outside the council chamber on Wednesday.

However the resolution only “calls upon” Iran to cease testing of ballistic missiles, which has led European diplomats to say that the move is “inconsistent” with the resolution, but not in violation — a crucial diplomatic distinction.

Consequently, the European line toed by many on the Council was that the JCPoA was working and needed to be upheld, and that they regretted the U.S. decision to pull out of the Obama-era accord in May and reimpose sanctions.

French Ambassador Francois Delattre said there was no “credible alternative” to the JCPoA and noted that the U.N.’s nuclear watchdog had repeatedly found Iran to be in compliance.

“Iran continues honoring its nuclear obligations, confirmed for 13th time in a row by the International Atomic Energy Agency,” he said.

Russian Ambassador Vasily Nebenzya, meanwhile, accused the U.S. of stoking anti-Iranian hysteria and called for the end to unilateral actions.

“The only way to preserve the agreement is diligent implementation by remaining members of commitments they voluntarily undertook,” he said.

But Pompeo dismissed the idea that the deal was bringing Iran into line and said the test was a sign that Iran is “defiant of the world’s insistence as ever.”

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“Iran’s pace of missile activity, including missile launches and tests, did not diminish since the JCPOA. In fact, Iran’s missile testing and missile proliferation is growing,” he said.

Pompeo’s criticism of Iran’s behavior did see some support from Council members, where there was criticism of Iran’s missile test and other “destabilizing activities” in the region, such as in Yemen, Iraq and Syria. U.K. Ambassador Karen Pierce defended the JCPoA, but then warned Iran that the accord is “not a license [for Iran] to engage in destabilizing behavior elsewhere — whether or not that has a nuclear link."

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She accused Iran of “ignoring the will of this Council” and said that while Iran has national security interests, “the way Iran goes about pursuing those interests is leading to increased destabilization and is simply not legitimate in the modern world."

Delattre also expressed concern about Iran’s actions and said it should “immediately cease all these destabilizing activities.”

“It is up to each one of us to convey this message and France will continue its demanding dialogue with Iran on this issue,” he said.

Pompeo’s case was hardened by a report by the secretary general, on which the council was briefed Wednesday, that found that anti-tank missile launchers found in Yemen were manufactured by Iran in 2016 and 2017. The E.U. group of eight members on the Council, in a statement ahead of the meeting, called the JCPoA “an example of effective multilateralism” but said it was “very concerned” about the Secretary-General’s findings.

After the meeting, in response to a question from Fox News, Pompeo said that the U.S. clearly has a different view from European countries on the Iran deal — “They view it as a linchpin, I view it as a disaster” — but said he wanted to “build out a coalition” to push back against Iranian activities.

“Make no mistake, American leadership is determined to work not only with Europeans — we think of Germany, France and Britain — but many other European countries who share our concerns as well. Countries throughout the Middle East, Asia, Africa all joining with the United States under our leadership to first acknowledge the risk that Iran presents and then set up a response that will ultimately deter them,” he said.

EUROPE OPEN DOORS TO SANCTIONS ON IRAN AFTER TERROR PLOTS IN DENMARK, PARIS

Europeans are facing increasing pressure to get tough on Iran — with a number of countries foiling terror attacks authorities say have been plotted from Tehran.

The Wall Street Journal reported in November that a call for sanctions by Danish diplomats won broad support at a meeting of E.U. ambassadors, after Denmark’s intelligence agency foiled an Iranian plot to kill an opposition activist and arrested a Norwegian of Iranian descent.

That alleged plot came after an Iranian diplomat based in Vienna was arrested in July for a plot to bomb an annual gathering of Iranian dissident groups in Paris, which Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani attended.

Fox News' Ben Evansky contributed to this report.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.

Nikki Haley defends President Trump’s rhetorical style in media interview

Nikki Haley, the departing U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, claims that President Trump's unpredictable rhetoric has often worked to the diplomatic advantage of the United States.

In an interview Wednesday with NBC's "Today" show, Haley explained her working dynamic with the president, referencing negotiations with other world ambassadors.

"We would partner in that. He would ratchet up the rhetoric, and I'd go back to the ambassadors and say, you know, he's pretty upset. I can't promise you what he's going to do or not, but I can tell you if we do these sanctions, it will keep him from going too far," she said.

Haley said she was "trying to get the job done."

"I got the job done by being truthful, but also by letting him be unpredictable and not showing our cards," she said.

Haley said working with the president involved being truthful to herself and to him, as well as being able to tell him when she thought matters were going in the right or wrong direction.

Haley also discussed the murder of activist Jamal Khashoggi, saying "I think we need to have a serious, hard talk with the Saudis to let them know we won't condone this, we won't give you a pass, and don't do this again."

"And then," Haley added, "I think that the administrations have to talk about where we go from here."

She also acknowledged how Saudi Arabia has helped the U.S.

"What I can tell you that is so important is that the Saudis have been our partner in defeating and dealing with Iran, and that has been hugely important," Haley said.

But she reinforced her tough response from earlier in the interview, saying "when these things (such as the murder of Khashoggi) happen, we have to step back and never back away from our principles."

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Haley will be leaving her post at year's end, but said she has not set plans for the next stage of her career — despite speculation that she may run for president at some point.

"I think a lot people have talked about what I may be doing in the future," she said. "But I can promise you, Michael (her husband Michael Haley, an officer in the South Carolina Army National Guard) and I have never talked about running for president, what that would look like, anything like that."

She said that's because their lives have been "such a fun surprise."

"The only decision I've made right now is that I'm looking forward to sleeping in," she said.

Amy Lieu is a news editor and reporter for Fox News.

Hamas hails UN failure to condemn rocket attacks as ‘slap in the face of America’

The Palestinian terror group Hamas has taunted the U.S. after the U.N. General Assembly failed this week to adopt a U.S. resolution condemning the militant group’s rocket attacks against Israel.

The U.S.-led resolution would have condemned Hamas for “repeatedly firing rockets into Israel and for inciting violence, thereby putting civilians at risk.” It would also have demanded that Hamas “and other militant actors, including Palestinian Islamic Jihad,” cease all provocative and violent actions; and condemn Hamas efforts to construct tunnels to infiltrate Israel and launch rockets into civilian areas.

But after a procedural move by Kuwait and Bolivia, the body adopted a rule that meant the resolution needed a two-thirds majority to be adopted. The resolution ultimately picked up a plurality of 87 votes in support and 58 against — with 32 abstentions. But it was not enough to meet the two-thirds threshold needed for passage.

UN SCORCHED BY HALEY, ISRAEL AS MEMBER STATES SHIELD HAMAS FROM CONDEMNATION

According to The Jerusalem Post, Hamas said the U.S. defeat was a “slap in the face of America” and a “victory for the Palestinian resistance.”

Hamas’s senior official, Khalil al-Haya, said that the result was a "victory for the Palestinian resistance in spite of American bullying.” He also thanked countries that voted against the resolution for preventing “the U.S. administration and Israel from criminalizing Palestinian resistance.”

Islamic Jihad spokesman Daoud Shehab also gloated, saying that the failure of the U.S. resolution was a “severe blow” to the U.S. and Israel, The Post reported Saturday.

On Thursday, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley ripped into the General Assembly for its failure to adopt the resolution.

“We can’t talk about peace in the Middle East until we can agree on a basic condemnation of Hamas and its terrorism,” Haley said. “The U.N. had a chance to do that today, and it failed.”

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley blasted the U.N. General Assembly for failing to adopt a resolution condemning Hamas terror. (AP)

“You should be ashamed of yourselves, wait until you have to deal with terrorism in your own countries," Israeli Ambassador Danny Danon told the General Assembly after the vote. "Your silence in the face of evil reveals your true colors."

Ahead of the vote, Haley accused those pushing for that threshold of double standards and noted that the U.N. had never once condemned Hamas by name — despite passing 700 resolutions blasting Israel.

"That, more than anything else, is a condemnation of the United Nations itself," she said in the chamber.

Noting Hamas’ control of Gaza since 2007, she accused the militant group of turning the territory into a police state with arbitrary arrests and torture of political prisoners. In a particularly dramatic moment, she appealed to Arab states to back the resolution and move past their hatred of Israel.

"I want to take a personal moment, and ask my Arab brothers and sisters: Is the hatred that strong? Is the hatred toward Israel so strong that you'll defend a terrorist organization?" she asked. “One that directly causes harm to the Palestinian people? Isn’t it time to let that go?”

Fox News’ Ben Evansky contributed to this report.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.

UN scorched by Haley, Israel as member states shield Hamas from condemnation

UNITED NATIONS – U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley and her Israeli counterpart blasted the United Nations for its failure Thursday to condemn rocket attacks by Palestinian terror group Hamas.

“We can’t talk about peace in the Middle East until we can agree on a basic condemnation of Hamas and its terrorism,” Haley said late Thursday. “The U.N. had a chance to do that today, and it failed.”

“You should be ashamed of yourselves, wait until you have to deal with terrorism in your own countries," Israeli Ambassador Danny Danon told the chamber. "Your silence in the face of evil reveals your true colors."

The U.S.-led resolution would have condemned Hamas for “repeatedly firing rockets into Israel and for inciting violence, thereby putting civilians at risk.” It would also have demanded that Hamas “and other militant actors, including Palestinian Islamic Jihad,” cease all provocative and violent actions; and condemn Hamas efforts to construct tunnels to infiltrate Israel and launch rockets into civilian areas.

UN FAILS TO ADOPT US RESOLUTION CONDEMNIING HAMAS TERRORISM

But after a procedural move by Kuwait and Bolivia, the body adopted a rule that meant the resolution needed a two-thirds majority to be adopted. The resolution ultimately picked up a plurality of 87 votes in support and 57 against — with 33 abstentions. But it was not enough to meet the two-thirds threshold.

Ahead of the vote, Haley accused those pushing for that threshold of double standards and noted that the U.N. had never once condemned Hamas by name — despite passing 700 resolutions blasting Israel.

"That, more than anything else, is a condemnation of the United Nations itself," she said.

She also posed the question of the resolution in stark terms: “The question before us now is whether the U.N. thinks terrorism is acceptable if, and only if, it is directed against Israel.”

Noting Hamas’ control of Gaza since 2007, she said that Hamas had turned it into a police state with arbitrary arrests and torture of political prisoners. She used her time at the General Assembly podium to challenge the Arab states.

"I want to take a personal moment, and ask my Arab brothers and sisters: Is the hatred that strong? Is the hatred toward Israel so strong that you'll defend a terrorist organization?" she asked. “One that directly causes harm to the Palestinian people? Isn’t it time to let that go?”

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But the calls by Haley and Danon were not enough to get the resolution through, though Danon noted that getting 87 countries to condemn Hamas was a sign of an “unprecedented coalition” at the U.N. to end anti-Israel bias:

“The broad support from the world demonstrates the changes we have made in the UN. With the support of these countries, we will continue our work in the UN against Hamas terrorism. I thank Ambassador Haley for her close cooperation in fighting for the truth that led to the formation of an unprecedented coalition for Israel and against terrorism.”

Had it passed, the resolution would have marked a major achievement for Haley, who departs from her role as U.N. ambassador in January and has made calling out anti-Israel bias one of the central goals of her time at the U.N.

President Trump confirmed Friday he will nominate State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert to succeed Haley. Nauert is likely to continue the push to curb anti-Israel bias at the U.N. if confirmed.

Fox News' Ben Evansky contributed to this report.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.

UN fails to adopt US resolution condemning Hamas terrorism

UNITED NATIONS – The United Nations General Assembly failed on Thursday to adopt a U.S. resolution that condemned terrorist acts by Hamas and other Palestinian militant groups — a blow for the U.S. push to curb anti-Israel bias at the body.

The U.S. resolution would have condemned Hamas for “repeatedly firing rockets into Israel and for inciting violence, thereby putting civilians at risk.” It would also have demanded that Hamas “and other militant actors, including Palestinian Islamic Jihad,” cease all provocative and violent actions; and condemn Hamas efforts to construct tunnels to infiltrate Israel and launch rockets into civilian areas.

But after a procedural move by Kuwait and Bolivia, the body adopted a rule that meant the U.S. resolution needed a two-thirds majority to be adopted. The resolution picked up a plurality of 87 votes in support and 57 against — with 33 abstentions. But it was not enough to meet the two-thirds threshold.

Ahead of the vote, U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley accused those who pushed for the two-thirds threshold of "double standards" and of trying to torpedo the resolution. In a speech to the chamber, she noted that, despite the many resolutions condemning and criticizing Israel, the U.N. has never passed a resolution condemning Hamas.

"That, more than anything else, is a condemnation of the United Nations itself," she said.

"There is nothing more anti-Semitic than saying we cannot condemn terrorism against Israel, while we would not hesitate for a minute to condemn the same acts if they were taken against any other country," she went on to say, noting the thousands of rockets from Hamas fired at civilian areas in Israel.

After accusing Hamas of turning Gaza, which it has controlled since 2007, into a "police state" and using torture and arbitrary arrests against political opponents, she asked Arab countries about their support for the group.

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"I want to take a personal moment, and ask my Arab brothers and sisters: Is the hatred that strong? Is the hatred toward Israel that strong that you'll defend a terrorist organization?" she asked.

U.S. officials had been hopeful that the resolution would pass, but the adoption of the two-thirds threshold proved critical. In speeches, Iran said the resolution was based on "deception" and ignored the "illegal occupation" by Israel. The ambassador for Saudi Arabia was fierce in his criticism of Israel.

"Israel is in contravention of all Security Council and General Assembly resolutions," its representative said. "Israel has no respect for this organization of which it is a member."

The failure to adopt the resolution is likely only to fuel further concerns that the body is uniquely anti-Israel as it struggles to condemn a terrorist group by name, while regularly passing resolutions that criticize Israel. The U.S. has made the argument that the U.N. is biased against Israel for years, but has intensified that argument during the Trump administration.

Anne Bayefsky, director of the Touro Institute on Human Rights and the Holocaust and President of Human Rights Voices, told Fox News that the Trump administration had given the U.N. a "clear choice" as to whether to condemn Hamas.

"In failing to do so, the plain fact is that the UN General Assembly refused to condemn an organization committed to the genocidal elimination of the Jewish state and the Jewish people," she said. "The reality cannot be avoided any longer: the UN is the headquarters of modern antisemitism and the people of the United States should rescind their support accordingly."

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Israeli Ambassador Danny Danon put a positive note on the result, arguing that the resolution would have been adopted “had it not been hijacked by a political move of procedure.” He also blasted those who voted against the measure.

“You should be ashamed of yourselves, wait until you have to deal with terrorism in your own countries," he told the chamber. "Your silence in the face of evil reveals your true colors."

Had it passed, the resolution would have marked a major achievement for Haley, who departs from her role as U.N. ambassador in January and has made calling out anti-Israel bias one of the central goals of her time at the U.N. President Trump has yet to name a successor for Haley.

ISRAEL CALLS FOR INTERNATIONAL RESPONSE TO HEZBOLLAH TUNNELS

Haley was the central player in rallying support for the measure, with a U.S. official saying that the U.S. Mission had coordinated closely with the National Security Council, the White House and the State Department.

Haley wrote to ambassadors this week urging them to vote for the resolution, noting that every year the General Assembly adopts more than a dozen resolutions on the Israeli-Palestinian issue, but “not one of these resolutions ever mentions Hamas or other militant groups in Gaza.”

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In the letter, seen by Fox News, she warned of potential attempts to disrupt the resolution with amendments by other countries, and urges members to vote against any amendments “or other efforts to undermine adoption of the text.”

The U.S. has been aggressive in its push to change the status quo at the U.N. It has yanked its $360 million-a-year funding to the U.N. Palestinian refugee agency (UNRWA), has defended its decision to declare Jerusalem to be the capital of Israel and also has pulled out of the U.N. Human Rights Council – in part due to the anti-Israel bias the U.S. says is present at the body.

SENATE RESOLUTION: SAUDI CROWN PRINCE 'COMPLICIT' IN KHASHOGGI MURDER

In turn, pro-Palestinian countries have amped up their push to promote the Palestinian cause. The G77 — a bloc of 134 developing countries such as Saudi Arabia, Iran, Cuba, China and Venezuela — have elevated “Palestine” to its leadership, raising the possibility that Palestinians may soon push to be recognized as an independent member state, something that would almost certainly be vetoed by the U.S.

Last month, the General Assembly — as part of a raft of anti-Israel resolutions — condemned the alleged “occupation” of the Golan Heights. The U.S. voted against the move, a change from its decision to abstain in 2017.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.

Moscow receives notification U.S. is ditching key arms treaty

MOSCOW — The Russian Foreign Ministry says it has received official notification from the United States that it intends to walk out of a key Cold War-era treaty.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced at a NATO meeting Tuesday that Washington would suspend its obligations under the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) in 60 days due to Russia's alleged "cheating."

Russia has denied U.S. and NATO allegations that it is violating the landmark treaty that banned an entire class of weapons.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova told reporters on Wednesday that Moscow has been received an official notice from Washington that quotes unspecified evidence of Russian violations. Zakharova insisted that Russia has always respected the treaty and considers it "one of the key pillars of strategic stability and international security."

Cracks in Iran deal coalition? Europeans fume over Tehran missile test

UNITED NATIONS – Diplomats from European countries on Tuesday blasted a recent Iranian missile test as “inconsistent” with a key U.N. Security Council resolution, as they struggle to keep the Iran deal intact amid U.S. pressure to get tough on the Islamic regime.

Iran test-fired a medium-range ballistic missile on Saturday, which the U.S. said had the capability to strike parts of Europe and the Middle East.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the missile was capable of carrying multiple warheads and was in violation of Security Council Resolution 2231 — which calls on Iran to refrain from “any activity related to ballistic missiles designed to be capable of delivering nuclear weapons, including launches using such ballistic missile technology.”

POMPEO SAYS IRAN TESTED BALLISTIC MISSILE IN VIOLATION OF UN RESOLUTION

Resolution 2231 was the Security Council’s enshrinement of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) — which the Trump administration withdrew the U.S. from in May. The other signatories were Germany, U.K., France, China and Russia.

But the missile test has posed challenges to those countries trying to uphold their end of the deal despite the U.S. withdrawal — drawing condemnation from European countries that otherwise have been supportive of the Iran pact. Consequently, the U.K. and France called a closed-door meeting of the Security Council on Tuesday to discuss the issue, though diplomats declared the test “inconsistent” with rather than “in violation” of 2231.

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U.K. Ambassador Karen Pierce called the actions "part and parcel of Iran's destabilizing activities in the region." Her comments echo U.K. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, who said Saturday that he was “deeply concerned by Iran’s actions," even as he reiterated support for the nuclear deal.

“Provocative, threatening and inconsistent with UNSCR 2231. Our support for JCPoA in no way lessens our concern at Iran’s destabilising missile programme and determination that it should cease,” he tweeted.

The claim that the move was “inconsistent” with 2231 was echoed by other diplomats at Turtle Bay.

“This kind of ballistic missile activity is inconsistent with the JCPoA , especially Annex B which calls on Iran not to engage in these kinds of activities,” Dutch Ambassador Karel van Oosterom said.

French Ambassador François Delattre also said Iran's actions were "inconsistent" with the resolution and called on Iran to "immediately cease any activity related to ballistic missiles designed to be able to carry nuclear weapons, including launches using ballistic missile technology."

The resolution's text only “calls upon” Iran to refrain from ballistic activity, rather than demanding it. It was that weaker language that kept diplomats from outright declaring Iran in violation of the resolution.

Israeli Ambassador Danny Danon told reporters, separately, that Israel, which does not sit on the Council, believes the test to be a violation of the resolution and called on the Security Council to condemn Iran for its actions.

The test marks the latest blow in Europe’s efforts to keep the 2015 accord alive, particularly after the U.S. withdrawal from the pact in May. The U.S. has since re-imposed multiple rounds of sanctions on the regime, including on crude oil exports last month, and has urged European allies to join them.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said in a statement Tuesday that the Iranian test was "dangerous and concerning, but not surprising" and called on the Council to act.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley has called on the U.N. Security Council to condemn Iran’s latest missile test. (AP)

“The United States has repeatedly warned the world about Iran’s deliberate efforts to destabilize the Middle East and defy international norms. The international community cannot keep turning a blind eye every time Iran blatantly ignores Security Council resolutions," she said.

"If the Security Council is serious about holding Iran accountable and enforcing our resolutions, then at a minimum we should be able to deliver a unanimous condemnation of this provocative missile test."

However, diplomats emerging from the closed-door meeting said while there were expressions of concern about Iran's activity, there were no immediate plans for any action against Iran in response.

The Iranians, meanwhile, argued they were in line with 2231: "Portraying Iran’s ballistic missile program as inconsistent with resolution 2231 or as a regional threat is a deceptive and hostile policy of the U.S."

Even as it re-imposed sanctions, the U.S. has warned that it will continue to act unilaterally if necessary. President Trump, at a U.N. Security Council meeting in September, warned that the U.S. "will pursue additional sanctions, tougher than ever before, to counter the entire range of Iran's malign conduct."

On Tuesday, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, called for more U.S. action to combat Iranian aggression.

“The United States has only begun to reverse the damage done by Obama's Iran nuclear deal, which gave the Ayatollahs the resources and diplomatic breathing room to build more and better ballistic missiles,” Cruz said in a statement to Fox News. “The last round of sanctions, while important, clearly failed to deter Iran from advancing their missile program. It's time to totally cut off Iran from the global financial system and deny them the resources they're using to threaten us and our allies.”

Some European leaders have recently opened the door to sanctions on Iran after the emergence of terror plots on European soil, which leaders say originate from Tehran.

The Wall Street Journal reported last month that a call for sanctions by Danish diplomats won broad support at a meeting of E.U. ambassadors, after Denmark’s intelligence agency foiled an Iranian plot to kill an opposition activist and arrested a Norwegian of Iranian descent.

EUROPE OPENS DOOR TO SANCTIONS ON IRAN AFTER TERROR PLOTS IN DENMARK, PARIS

That alleged plot came after an Iranian diplomat based in Vienna was arrested in July for a plot to bomb an annual gathering of Iranian dissident groups in Paris, which Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani attended.

Fox News' Ben Evansky contributed to this report.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.

Cruz calls on Trump administration to defund UN agencies that allow Palestinian membership

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, has called on the Trump administration to act on two laws that demand automatic defunding of U.N.-affiliated agencies that have allowed the Palestinians to join as a state.

The two laws, passed by Congress in the early 1990s, were meant to deter the U.N. and specialized agencies from accepting the Palestinians as a full member and not to allow groups that aren’t recognized as a state to join.

In a statement to Fox News, Cruz said that “Congress has spoken clearly and repeatedly,” on the issue and that “the Palestinian campaign is a diplomatic offensive against Israel that undermines the prospect for peace, and there must be consequences for U.N. entities that enable and promote that behavior.”

Cruz pointed to the most recent example of a U.N. agency allowing them to join: “The law requires the Trump administration to restrict funding from agencies like the Universal Postal Union, and the administration should clearly convey to the Postal Union that it intends to enforce the law.”

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According to its website, the Universal Postal Union has been a specialized U.N. agency since 1948. A month before the Palestinians said they would be joining in November, the Trump administration signaled it would seek to leave the union over the unfair financial advantages it gives to China and other nations at the expense of the United States.

A recent report by the non-partisan Jerusalem-based Kohelet Policy Forum on the subject giving recognition to the Palestinians has led to the politicization of the agencies that it joined.

Report author Eugene Kontorovich – a law professor at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University in Virginia – said the statutes were passed by an overwhelming bipartisan majority of Congress, “to deter the Palestinians from joining such organizations and to send a clear message to these organizations not to admit them.” He also said it was to save U.S. taxpayer dollars that had funded the organizations “that decided to be political arms of the Palestinian campaign of the deligitimization of Israel.”

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The report estimated that U.S. taxpayers have shelled out close to $28 million to fund the four agencies it lists.

But while the Trump administration has reportedly threatened to defund the agencies, they have not yet done so.

“I think it's inexplicable in an administration which wants to critically evaluate the U.N., and is hostile to Palestinian unilateralism, is not implementing binding congressional statutes to defund these agencies,” Kontorovich said. 

According to his report the Palestinian Authority has joined four U.N.-affiliated organizations in the past two years with the aim of seeking “a complete end-run around peace negotiations.”

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The four include the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC.)

The report said the law has only been enforced one time and when the Palestinian’s joined UNESCO in 2011, “forcing a reluctant Obama administration to end U.S. funding, which constituted 22 percent of its budget.” The US quit the organization earlier this year. The report also criticized the Obama administration for not defunding the UNFCCC.

While a United States U.N. Mission spokesperson did not say why U.S. funding had not yet been halted to the agencies, they told Fox News: “The United States has long opposed enhancements of Palestinian status at the United Nations. We voted against Palestinian election as Chair of the G77. We opposed the General Assembly’s resolution designating the Palestinian delegation as a non-member Observer State.”

“We have consistently and formally objected to Palestinian accession to treaties to which we are a party," the spokesperson said. "That is because, as we have said repeatedly, the United States does not recognize that there is a Palestinian state.”

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U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley has said that the Palestinian Authority’s tactic hurts the prospects for peace between the sides while at the same time doing nothing to help the Palestinian people.

The Palestinian Authority is a non-member observer state of the United Nations. So far this year it has reportedly looked to join at least 11 international organizations and statutes.

 Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Ben Evansky reports for Fox News on the United Nations and international affairs.He can be followed @BenEvansky

Pompeo says Iran tested ballistic missile, in violation of UN resolution

The Trump administration on Saturday accused Iran of test-firing a medium-range ballistic missile, with the capability to strike parts of Europe and the Middle East — a move the U.S. says is in violation of a U.N. Security Council resolution.

Secretary Mike Pompeo said in a statement that Iran had fired the missile, capable of carrying multiple warheads, and it was in violation of U.N. Security Council resolution 2231 — which calls on Iran to refrain from  “any activity related to ballistic missiles designed to be capable of delivering nuclear weapons, including launches using such ballistic missile technology.”

Resolution 2231 was the Security Council’s endorsement of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, from which the Trump administration withdrew the U.S. from in May.

EUROPE OPENS DOOR TO SANCTIONS ON IRAN AFTER TERROR PLOTS IN DENMARK, PARIS

“As we have been warning for some time, Iran’s missile testing and missile proliferation is growing,” Pompeo said in a statement. “We are accumulating risk of escalation in the region if we fail to restore deterrence. We condemn these activities, and call upon Iran to cease immediately all activities related to ballistic missiles designed to be capable of delivering nuclear weapons.”

The Trump administration has been continually pointing to “malign activities” by the Iranian regime that they say violates the Iran deal — which Trump has repeatedly described as one of the worst deals “ever made” — and other international agreements.

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On Thursday, the administration accused Iran of violating a U.N. ban on arms exports by sending rockets and other weapons to rebels in Afghanistan and Yemen, and showed weapons and fragments seized that it said provided “irrefutable evidence” that Iran’s activity is getting worse in the region.

"It's important for all nations to understand that this is a global threat that requires a global response," Brian Hook, the U.S. special representative for Iran, told reporters. "it would be an act of negligence for us to be in possession of these arms and not to publicize it."

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The Trump administration has reimposed economic sanctions on the regime, with sanctions on crude oil exports re-imposed last month. President Trump, at a U.N. Security Council meeting in September, warned that the U.S. "will pursue additional sanctions, tougher than ever before, to counter the entire range of Iran's malign conduct."

Pompeo announced in October that the U.S. was terminating a 1955 treaty with Iran after the U.N.'s International Court of Justice used it to order to the U.S. to ease some of its economic sanctions on the regime."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.